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Shellmound (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.77
fteenth Alabama regiment. One of the wounded was left in the hands of the enemy, too severely injured to be removed. At five o'clock, in the afternoon of the 27th, I learned from my scouts that a considerable force of the enemy was moving from Shellmound in the direction of Chattanooga, and that this force was then in eight or ten miles of my position on Lookout creek. I ascertained further, that a force of cavalry was advancing from Kelley's ferry, where a bridge had been thrown across the ri bridge above Brown's ferry to Chattanooga. This has since been done. About noon on the 28th, I was notified by cavalry scouts and the signal post on Lookout that a heavy column of the enemy was approaching my position from the direction of Shellmound. Soon afterwards his skirmishers appeared in front. They were checked for a time by skirmishers, posted so as to command the intersection of the railroad with the wagon road leading from Chattanooga towards Bridgeport. My riflemen were soon
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.77
f keeping a force in that locality, as I understood it, was to blockade the road leading from Chattanooga to Bridgeport, which passed near the point of Raccoon mountain, and on the opposite (or west) scouts that a considerable force of the enemy was moving from Shellmound in the direction of Chattanooga, and that this force was then in eight or ten miles of my position on Lookout creek. I ascern supplies by running wagon trains from the junction across the bridge above Brown's ferry to Chattanooga. This has since been done. About noon on the 28th, I was notified by cavalry scouts and trs, posted so as to command the intersection of the railroad with the wagon road leading from Chattanooga towards Bridgeport. My riflemen were soon forced, however, to abandon this position and takeanded the Brown's ferry road at its junction with the road leading across the lower bridge to Chattanooga, to blockade that road and capture any trains that might attempt to pass. This junction I sh
Lookout Valley (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.77
Lookout Valley, October 28, 1863. Report of General E. M. Law. headquarters Law's brigade, November 3rd, 1863. Captain,--I have the honor to report that my brigade was detached about the 8th October for duty beyond Lookout mountain. The object of keeping a force in that locality, as I understood it, was to blockade mand of the division, I came to this side of the mountain, leaving Captain L. R. Terrell, A. A. General, as my representative to superintend the operations in Lookout Valley. On the morning of the 27th, just before daylight, the enemy taking advantage of the fog, which was very dense, commenced the passage of the river at Brownookout mountain at present, but to take possession of the railroad as far as the Trenton junction, two miles from the foot of Lookout mountain; and by holding Lookout valley, to obtain supplies by running wagon trains from the junction across the bridge above Brown's ferry to Chattanooga. This has since been done. About noon o
Bridgeport, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.77
Captain,--I have the honor to report that my brigade was detached about the 8th October for duty beyond Lookout mountain. The object of keeping a force in that locality, as I understood it, was to blockade the road leading from Chattanooga to Bridgeport, which passed near the point of Raccoon mountain, and on the opposite (or west) side of the Tennessee. This object was accomplished by placing riflemen along this bank of the river (which, at this point, is about three hundred yards wide,) to on from the direction of Shellmound. Soon afterwards his skirmishers appeared in front. They were checked for a time by skirmishers, posted so as to command the intersection of the railroad with the wagon road leading from Chattanooga towards Bridgeport. My riflemen were soon forced, however, to abandon this position and take up the line of Lookout creek. The enemy on crossing the railroad took the road leading to Brown's ferry; fired upon as he passed by my section of howitzers and the batt
Raccoon Mountains (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.77
eneral Robertson to place the First Texas regiment, together with part of the Fifth Texas, already there, on an open hill between the bridge and the point from which the enemy was moving, on our right. The movement was executed in a quiet and leisurely manner, the enemy in front making no effort to follow. During the engagement of Colonel Bratton with the enemy no troops passed from the right along the road or in sight of it. It was possible, however, for them to pass near the foot of Raccoon mountain while the attack on my position was progressing. When the order for my command to retire was given I had already received information that Colonel Bratton had been withdrawn, that he was actually at the bridge, and the firing on the left had ceased for nearly, if not quite, half an hour. Believing that the object for which my position was occupied had been accomplished, I withdrew. The movement of the enemy on my right would in a few minutes more have necessitated a change of positio
Trenton, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.77
object in obtaining the ridge was, I suppose, to command the road leading down the valley from Trenton and Kelly's Ferry to Brown's Ferry, on the Tennessee river. It was very soon ascertained that w until relieved by General Benning, swept down the railroad between the hills mentioned to the Trenton road, capturing a few pickets or stragglers. I then changed direction to the left, and advanced down the Trenton road with four regiments: the Palmetto Sharpshooters, Colonel Walker; Second rifles, Colonel Thompson; First South Carolina volunteers, Colonel Kilpatrick; and Fifth regiment, Colonel A. Coward. The Sixth, Major White, was ordered to advance to the Trenton road and throw its pickets out to watch the Selly's farm road as well as the Brown's Ferry road. The Legion was by this without opposition until near a branch about a half mile from the point at which we entered the Trenton road, then, after some little picket firing, our skirmishers crossed the branch and came in sig
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 8.77
corps. After moving up the road a short distance I was ordered to file my regiment to the right in an open field, at the base of a ridge in my front, and form line of battle in one rank. I then sent pickets in front, under Captain Eubanks, who soon reported no enemy on the ridge. I then advanced rapidly, taking possession of the ridge. The object in obtaining the ridge was, I suppose, to command the road leading down the valley from Trenton and Kelly's Ferry to Brown's Ferry, on the Tennessee river. It was very soon ascertained that there was another and higher ridge in our front, beyond which the road ran. The General commanding (Law) informed me of these facts and ordered me to advance and obtain possession of the ridge in front at all hazards. I had sent Captain Eubanks forward with five men, who soon sent one of the men back, reported no enemy on the ridge, but a large encampment of Federal troops about half mile from the point of the ridge where my left was to rest. He (Ca
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.77
my brigade was detached about the 8th October for duty beyond Lookout mountain. The object of keeping a force in that locality, as I underst picket the river from that point to the bend near the foot of Lookout mountain, a distance of five miles. This would either prevent the enemycting their pickets with the artillery, retired slowly towards Lookout mountain (I met them with the remainder of the brigade at Lookout creek that it was probably not the intention of the enemy to attack Lookout mountain at present, but to take possession of the railroad as far as the Trenton junction, two miles from the foot of Lookout mountain; and by holding Lookout valley, to obtain supplies by running wagon trains frbout a mile, leaving the river as it bends towards the foot of Lookout Mountain and projecting into the valley beyond. The range, at the poinsed from our regular position on the line to the other side of Lookout mountain, in accordance with orders crossed Lookout creek near the rail
ced down the Trenton road with four regiments: the Palmetto Sharpshooters, Colonel Walker; Second rifles, Colonel Thompson; First South Carolina volunteers, Colonel Kilpatrick; and Fifth regiment, Colonel A. Coward. The Sixth, Major White, was ordered to advance to the Trenton road and throw its pickets out to watch the Selly's fd be seen by the light of their camp fires, which they were then extinguishing. I immediately threw three regiments, Second rifles, Colonel Thomson; First, Colonel Kilpatrick, and Fifth, Colonel Coward, upon them, with orders not to fire until they passed our skirmishers. The Palmetto Sharpshooters, Colonel Walker, were ordered eek. I was ordered back to camp, which I reached a little after sunrise on the morning of the 29th October. Our loss, I regret to say, is most serious. Colonel Kilpatrick of the First South Carolina volunteers, distinguished not only for gallantry, but for efficiency, was shot through the heart early in the engagement. His b
ved us from any of the horrible accidents that can so easily attend night attacks. To say that I am proud of their conduct would but feebly express my feelings. I refer you to accompanying reports of commanders of regiments for particulars as to the parts taken by them. I have to regret the loss of the services of Captain J. L. Coker, Sixth regiment South Carolina volunteers, acting assistant adjutant-general on my staff. He was seriously wounded while nobly performing his duty. My courier and a guide from General Law's brigade, whose name I did not learn, are entitled to my thanks for their conduct on the occasion. I cannot close without making special mention of Courier George Peitz, whose enthusiastic gallantry and intelligent conveyance of orders after the fall of my acting assistant adjutant-general contributed greatly to the good order and success of the withdrawal. Respectfully submitted, J. Bratton, Colonel Commanding. Captain R. M. Sims, Assistant Adjutant-General.
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