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soldier consequently felt that should extraordinary circumstances call for his presence at home, there was always a chance of obtaining furlough, and this very consciousness relieved his anxiety and made his long absences much more cheerful. Nothing worthy of narration broke the monotony of winter-quarters, except changes of commanders in the brigades. General Cocke, a high-minded and gallant soldier, a devoted patriot, and a gentleman of cultivation and refinement, committed suicide in January at his home while on sick leave. He and his brigade had performed excellent service at the battle of Bull Run, but his health had failed on the approach of winter, and his mind had become affected, though so slightly, that no apprehensions were entertained of such result. He was a graduate of West Point, of the class of 1832, and served for two years afterward in the Second United States Artillery. After his death his brigade was commanded by Colonel R. E. Withers, the Senior Colonel pre
s a graduate of West Point, of the class of 1832, and served for two years afterward in the Second United States Artillery. After his death his brigade was commanded by Colonel R. E. Withers, the Senior Colonel present, until the latter part of February, when General George E. Pickett As a Captain in the Ninth United States Infantry, General Pickett bore a prominent part in the San Juan difficulty with England in 1859. He graduated at West Point in 1846, and served in the Eighth United States Infantry in Mexico, receiving two brevets for gallantry. of Virginia was assigned to it. Hunton's regiment did not rejoin the brigade from Leesburg until March. Early in February General D. R. Jones was assigned to the command of a Georgia brigade, in General G. W. Smith's division, and General R. H. Anderson, of South Carolina, General R. H. Anderson graduated at West Point, in 1838, and served in the First United States Dragoons until the secession of South Carolina. He was brevetted f
tly until after the promulgationof the law aforesaid. Applications based upon the most urgent grounds, such as the death of parents, wives, or of partners in business, or summons before courts in cases where large amounts of property were involved, were even returned unread, further than to see that they were applications for leaves of absence. Even after the promulgation of the law its operation was delayed until the wintry weather had rendered the roads impassable. At length, on the 3d of February, an order was issued allowing furloughs to twenty per cent. of the number present for duty in each regiment, and the system thus introduced was adhered to until the close of the war. One or two per cent. of the force present for duty were allowed to be absent on furlough even during the most active campaigns, and in winter-quarters the percentage was very much increased. The soldier consequently felt that should extraordinary circumstances call for his presence at home, there was always
February 28th (search for this): chapter 11.108
ted idea of the Confederate force, which he estimated at 115,500, its true strength being only 50,000. He accordingly left for the defence of Washington 77,456 men and 109 guns, McClellan's Report, page 65. while 120,500 met. were transferred to Fortress Monroe, where General Wool was to add 10,000 to this number. The rapid transfer of this army, with its immense material is one of the most remarkable events of the war, and illustrates the enormous resources of the enemy. On the 28th of February orders were first issued to prepare transportation for the movement. Within seventeen days the transportation was ready, comprising 113 steamers, 188 schooners, and 88 barges, the hire of all of which cost $29,160 per day. The distance to be traversed was about two hundred miles, and within twenty days thereafter the whole transfer was complete, comprising besides the troops 260 guns, 14,592 animals, 1,150 wagons, 74 ambulances, and an enormous quantity of equipage, including ammunitio
England in 1859. He graduated at West Point in 1846, and served in the Eighth United States Infantry in Mexico, receiving two brevets for gallantry. of Virginia was assigned to it. Hunton's regiment did not rejoin the brigade from Leesburg until March. Early in February General D. R. Jones was assigned to the command of a Georgia brigade, in General G. W. Smith's division, and General R. H. Anderson, of South Carolina, General R. H. Anderson graduated at West Point, in 1838, and served in served, to command the South Carolina brigade. General Ewell had been assigned to command General Longstreet's old brigade in December, but being shortly afterward made Major-General; the command reverted to Col. Kemper, who retained it until March, when General A. P. Hill was assigned to it. On the 9th of March, 1862, General Johnston ordered the evacuation of the lines of Centreville and Manassas, and put his army in motion for the line of the Rapidan. General Longstreet's division, w
of the best families of New Orleans. Its numbers were general small, as it refused to receive recruits promiscuously, and the four batteries usually averaged but three guns each. of New Orleans was assigned to Longstreet's division when this movement commenced, and continued to serve with the division and corps until the latter came to Georgia in September, 1863. After crossing the Rappahannock, a halt of a few days was made, after which the arty retired behind the Rapidan, about the 23d of March. The enemy having occupied Manassas, pushed out a reconnoissance under General Howard, which, about the 26th, had a small skirmish with Stuart holding the Rappahannock as a picket line, and then withdrew. Meanwhile, after considerable opposition from the President, who favored a direct advance upon Manassas, General McClellan had sucseeded in instituting his desired campaign, an advance upon Richmond by way of the Peninsula, although under certain restrictions by Mr. Lincoln, which al
ia Battery.--General D. R. Jones's brigade was composed of the Fourth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel J. B Sloan; Fifth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel M. Jenkins; Sixth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel C. S. Winder; Ninth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel Blanding; Stribling's Virginia Battery. The Eighth Virginia, Colonel Hunton, was at this time on detached service at Leesburg with General Evans's brigade, where it bore a conspicuous part in the the affair at Ball's Bluff, on the 21st of October. The remaining brigades of the army were about the same time thrown into three other divisions of three brigades each and commanded by Major-Generals G. W. Smith, E. Kirby Smith, and Earl Van Doon. Thus constituted, and with a small cavalry force under General Stuart holding the outposts beyond Halifax C. H. and a General Reserve Artillery of ten batteries under Colonel W. N. Pendleton, the army went into quarters. As the great majority of the army were volunteers enlisted for on
Sketch of Longstreet's division. By General E. P. Alexander. Winter of 1861-62. Until late in the fall of 1861, no Major-Generals had been appointed in the Confederate service; the only general officers being Brigadier-Generals and Generalsand consequently no divisions could be organized of the brigades which composed the army, although the necessity for them had been grievously felt, expecially in the battle of Bull Run. About the 1st of November, the rank having been created by Congress, a number of appointments were made, of which General Longstreet was the fifth in rank, the first four being Polk, Bragg, G. W. Smith and Huger. On receipt of his promotion, General Longstreet was relieved of command of the Advanced forces by General J. E. B. Stuart, and was assigned a division composed of his own old brigade, now commanded by the senior Colonel, J. L. Kemper; the Virginia brigade commanded by General P. St. George Cocke, and the South Carolina brigade of General D. R. J
de, in General G. W. Smith's division, and General R. H. Anderson, of South Carolina, General R. H. Anderson graduated at West Point, in 1838, and served in the First United States Dragoons until the secession of South Carolina. He was brevetted for gallantry in Mexico, and was a Captain when he resigned. was transferred from Pensacola, where he had previously served, to command the South Carolina brigade. General Ewell had been assigned to command General Longstreet's old brigade in December, but being shortly afterward made Major-General; the command reverted to Col. Kemper, who retained it until March, when General A. P. Hill was assigned to it. On the 9th of March, 1862, General Johnston ordered the evacuation of the lines of Centreville and Manassas, and put his army in motion for the line of the Rapidan. General Longstreet's division, with Stuart's cavalry covered the movement, which, however, was unmolested, the enemy only discovering it after it was under way. Genera
commanders in the brigades. General Cocke, a high-minded and gallant soldier, a devoted patriot, and a gentleman of cultivation and refinement, committed suicide in January at his home while on sick leave. He and his brigade had performed excellent service at the battle of Bull Run, but his health had failed on the approach of winter, and his mind had become affected, though so slightly, that no apprehensions were entertained of such result. He was a graduate of West Point, of the class of 1832, and served for two years afterward in the Second United States Artillery. After his death his brigade was commanded by Colonel R. E. Withers, the Senior Colonel present, until the latter part of February, when General George E. Pickett As a Captain in the Ninth United States Infantry, General Pickett bore a prominent part in the San Juan difficulty with England in 1859. He graduated at West Point in 1846, and served in the Eighth United States Infantry in Mexico, receiving two brevets f
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