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Mount Pleasant (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.110
us from yourself or the Commanding General. As he left he said: We will resume this conversation at the first convenient moment, but in less than three hours after that time this gallant soldier was a corpse upon the bloody field of Franklin. Yours very truly, John C. Brown, Major General. Extract from official report of Major-General William B. Bate, January 25, 1865. I left Florence, Alabama, on the 21st of November with my command, moving with its corps via Waynesboro and Mount Pleasant, near Columbia, Tennessee, and into bivouac on the 26th of November, on the Shelbyville turnpike. The succeeding day and night was followed with slight skirmishing on the line around Columbia. At daylight on the morning of the 29th I moved to Duck river, four miles above Columbia, and crossed on the pontoon bridge at 7:30 o'clock, which was assoon as I could do so, having to wait for General Cleburne's division, which had the advance. I moved that day in rear of that division to the n
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.110
oubly zealous in the service of his country. The following are the dispatches above referred to: Headquarters, six miles from Nashville, on Franklin pike, December 7, 1864. Hon. J. A. Seddon: I withdraw my recommendation in favor of the promotion of Major-General Cheatham, for reasons which I will write more fully. J. B. Hood, General. Headquarters, six miles from Nashville, on Franklin pike, December 8, 1864. Hon. James A. Seddon, Secretary of War; General G. T. Beauregard, Macon, Ga.: A good Lieutenant-General should be sent here at once to command the corps now commanded by Major-General Cheatham. I have no one to recommend for the position. J. B. Hood, General. Headquarters, six miles from Nashville, on Franklin pike, December 8, 1864. Hon. J. A. Seddon: Major-General Cheatham made a failure on the 30th of November which will be a lesson to him. I think it best he should remain in his position for the present. I withdraw my telegrams of yesterday and to-da
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.110
9, 1881. Governor J. D. Porter Dear Sir: Your letter of the 19th instant is received, and my excuse for not answering sooner is that I have been very busy in connection with our Cotton Exposition. I have read the memorandum note you inclosed, and, according to my recollection, it is strictly, entirely correct. Yours truly, J. F. Cummings. General Stewart's statements. Chancellor's Office, University of Mississippi, Oxford,. Miss., February 8, 1881. Captain W. O. Dodd, Louisville, Ky. My Dear Sir: My account of the Spring Hill affair is in possession of the War-records office, in charge of General General Marcus J. Wright, and will be published with the other papers collected by that office. I have not time now to write out an account of the matter. I will say, however, that on that occasion General Hood was at the front with Cheatham's and Forrest's troops, and should have compelled the execution of his orders. I was not allowed to cross Rutherford's creek unt
Bear Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.110
ont. General Lowry states that General Hood rode with him a large part of the day. During the march the Federal cavalry appeared on the hills to our left; not a moment, however, was lost on that account, as the army was marching by the right flank, and was prepared to face at any instant in their direction. No attention, therefore, was paid to the enemy, save to throw out a few sharpshooters in his front. --[Advance and Retreat, p. 284. General John C. Brown states that at or near Bear creek the Commanding General, apprehending an attack on our left flank, ordered your (Cheatham's) corps, in its march from that point, to move in two parallel columns, so that it could come instantly into action in two lines of battle. General Brown's division marched five or six miles through fields and woods and over rough ground some four hundred yards to the right of the road, necessarily causing more or less delay. General Brown further states that about the commencement of this movement,
Duck River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.110
ety on December 1st.] In pursuance of orders from Army Headquarters, my command crossed Duck river on the morning of the 29th of November, 1864, the division of Major-General Cleburne in advanc no movement of wagons and men in the vicinity of Spring Hill. Moreover, from the crossing at Duck river to the point referred to by General Hood the turnpike was never in view, nor could it be seen ted on the march about sunrise, and, after traversing cedar brakes and pathless woods, crossed Duck river by a pontoon previously laid, about four miles above Columbia, at or near what was known as Daternations in column, my division was on that march in the rear of your corps. After crossing Duck river, and, as I now recollect, at or near Bear creek, the Commanding General, apprehending an attacht skirmishing on the line around Columbia. At daylight on the morning of the 29th I moved to Duck river, four miles above Columbia, and crossed on the pontoon bridge at 7:30 o'clock, which was assoo
Headquarters (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.110
trieve his shortcoming, he would prove in the future doubly zealous in the service of his country. The following are the dispatches above referred to: Headquarters, six miles from Nashville, on Franklin pike, December 7, 1864. Hon. J. A. Seddon: I withdraw my recommendation in favor of the promotion of Major-General Cheatham, for reasons which I will write more fully. J. B. Hood, General. Headquarters, six miles from Nashville, on Franklin pike, December 8, 1864. Hon. James A. Seddon, Secretary of War; General G. T. Beauregard, Macon, Ga.: A good Lieutenant-General should be sent here at once to command the corps now commanded by Major-General Cheatham. I have no one to recommend for the position. J. B. Hood, General. Headquarters, six miles from Nashville, on Franklin pike, December 8, 1864. Hon. J. A. Seddon: Major-General Cheatham made a failure on the 30th of November which will be a lesson to him. I think it best he should remain in his position for th
Fort Caswell (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.110
ed forward in the direction of the enemy, who held the turnpike. It was now getting dark, and I had moved more than a mile in line of battle. Cleburne had been engaged, with what success I did not know. Procuring a guide, learning the exact locality of the enemy, and the general direction of the turnpike, I changed direction to the right again, and was moving so as to strike the turnpike to the right of Major Nat. Cheair's residence, which I believed would bring me near Cleburne's left. Caswell's battalion of sharpshooters, deployed as skirmishers, was in a hundred yards of and commanded the turnpike, checking the enemy's movement along it in my front; and my lines were being adjusted for a further forward movement, when I received an order, through Lieutenant Schell, from General Cheatham to halt and join my right to General Cleburne's left. My main line was in two hundred yards of the turnpike, when Major Caswell's battalion fired into the enemy on the pike. He (the enemy) vee
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.110
atched them. I did not see the enemy's wagons during the day. Rather, I should say, I do not remember it if I did. I lost my papers, and do not remember exactly my loss. But all that were lost in the engagement were my men, except, I believe, five or six wounded in Govan's brigade — probably one or two killed. I think I had 1,400 to 1,600 men in line that day, but can not state definitely. Yours truly, M. P. Lowry. To General B. F. Cheatham. General Brown's statement. St. Louis, Mo., October 24, 1881. General B. F. Cheatham, Nashville, Tenn. Dear General: Complying with your request to state my recollection of the operations of your corps in the Hood campaign from Columbia to Franklin, and especially the part taken in that movement by my division of your corps, I must premise the statement with an expression of regret that the full and comprehensive report made by me soon after the close of that campaign, with list of casualties and just mention of meritorious co
Sumner (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.110
just left and informed me that he holds the turnpike with a portion of his forces north of Spring Hill, and will stop the enemy if he tries to pass toward Franklin, and so in the morning we will have a surrender without a fight. He further said, in a congratulatory manner: We can sleep quiet to night. I said to the General I was glad to hear what he told me, and immediately left. The staff officer with me, if I remember correctly, was Lieutenant Charles B. Rogan, who now lives in Sumner county, Tennessee, either heard the conversation or I immediately informed him of it, for it was discussed as we returned to our lines, and on our arrival at our bivouac made it known to Captain H. J. Cheeny, my A. A. G. (now a citizen of this county), and also to other staff officers, nearly all of whom are yet living. You can imagine my surprise next morning when I learned the enemy had come from our front. The foregoing is in substance what was said on the occasion referred to as I recollect
Davis Ford (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.110
ft my bivouac on the Mooresville turnpike in front of Columbia, Tenn., numbered not exceeding 2,750 effective men. Gist's brigade was the largest, and Strahl's was next in numerical strength; those of Gordon and Carter being about equal in the number of effective men. We started on the march about sunrise, and, after traversing cedar brakes and pathless woods, crossed Duck river by a pontoon previously laid, about four miles above Columbia, at or near what was known as Davis' Ferry, or Davis' Ford. Conforming to the daily alternations in column, my division was on that march in the rear of your corps. After crossing Duck river, and, as I now recollect, at or near Bear creek, the Commanding General, apprehending an attack on our left flank, ordered your corps, in its march from that point, to move in two parallel columns, so that it could come instantly into action in two lines of battle, if attacked on the flank. Accordingly my division was ordered to form the supporting column,
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