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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Fort Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.111
a belt around his person, but after some argument on my part he allowed me to put it in his saddle-bags. The party then were already on horse, and Good-bye was said. The President's party was captured a few days afterward, and upon their release from prison several of the party told me that every one was robbed of all they had, except Colonel F. R. Lubbock, who, after stout resistance and great risk, retained his money, upon which the party subsisted during their long imprisonment at Fort Delaware. No gold was found on President Davis when captured, for he had none.--He could only have received it through me, and I paid him none. Mr. Trenholm was left sick in South Carolina. Attorney-General Davis was left at Charlotte, N. C. Mr. Benjamin left us before reaching Washington, Ga., and Mr. Mallory at Washington. I paid the members of the Cabinet nothing, except to General Breckinridge, and his receipt quoted shows the character of that payment. The only money Judge Reagan receive
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.111
er-moving train, which would be compelled mainly to keep the roads in case of danger — that they would need money for their supplies en route, and to buy boats in Florida, etc., and that I wished to pay over to them funds to be used for those purposes, and they consenting I paid, with the concurrence of Hon. John H. Reagan, the acties; escaped men from both, having evaded surrender; men who had been exchanged and had started to join their commands — and north of Abbeville and all the way to Florida, I met men who, being still free to fight, were wending their way to the Mississippi river. I met them on my return from Florida in June, plodding their weary waFlorida in June, plodding their weary way back to their homes. These belong to the Atlantic States. I traveled with some all the way to Virginia; those belonging to the States west of Georgia were already home again. These men and officers were some of the pick and flower of the Confederate States armies; men who, in the four years desperate struggle, having to fight
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 11.111
s as follows, viz: Washington, Ga., May 4, 1865. M. H. Clark, Esq., is hereby appointed Acting Treasurer of the Confederate States, and is authorized to act as such during the absence of the Treasurer. Jefferson Davis. [This was the last ofdisbursed by myself, and covered it into the Treasury accounts by the paper, of which below is a copy: Confederate States of America, Washington, Ga., May 4, 1865.--Hon. J. C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War: There is required for payment oeceived of M. H. Clark, Acting Treasurer, C. S., fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) in gold coin, the property of the Confederate States, for transmission abroad, of the safe arrival of which due notice to be given the Secretary of the Treasury. I the States west of Georgia were already home again. These men and officers were some of the pick and flower of the Confederate States armies; men who, in the four years desperate struggle, having to fight every nationality under the sun, except the
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.111
government officials, being at the time the chief and confidential clerk of the Executive office. The party reached Danville, Va., next day (General Breckinridge arriving a few days afterwards) where the government officers were partially reorganit had opened its depositories and had been selling silver coin, the rate being fixed at $60 for $1 in coin. While at Danville, Va., the Treasury Department resumed these sales, the rate there being $70 for $1. About $40,000 in silver, generally to $288,022.90. Adding the $39,000 left at Greensboro, N. C., the Treasury contained in coin and bullion when it left Danville, Va., $327,022.90. If the Treasury at Richmond had contained $2,500,000 in coin certainly the brave men of our armies wy. I also paid to each $10 in silver for small uses, from a little executive office fund, which I had obtained in Danville, Va., by converting my paper when the Treasurer was selling silver there. For this I took no receipt, charging it in my o
Clarksville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.111
se of the war, which shall forever set at rest the miserable slanders against President Davis, which have been so often refuted only to be revived by the malignity of his enemies. And we ask everyone, who has any facts bearing on the question, to send them to us at once. But, in the meantime, we publish the following clear and conclusive statement by the last Acting Treasurer of the Confederacy, Captain M. H. Clark, only omitting the opening paragraphs, which are not essential:] Clarksville, Tenn., January 10th, 1882. To the Editor of the Courier-Journal: * * * * * * * * * * * * * I will state briefly as possible my connection with the Confederate Treasury, and run hastily over the route from Richmond, Va., to Washington, Ga. I left Richmond, Va., the night of the evacuation with all the papers of the Executive office, on the special train containing the President, his staff, his Cabinet (excepting the Secretary of War, General John C. Breckinridge,) and many other govern
Savannah River (United States) (search for this): chapter 11.111
ere raiding on a parallel line with our route, between us and the mountains. Mr. J. A. Trenholm, the Secretary of the Treasury, having been left quite ill near the Catawba river, the President appointed the Postmaster-General, Hon. John H. Reagan, acting Secretary of the Treasury, who took charge of that department, and placed the train under charge of the cavalry to convoy it to Washington, Ga. The party, except General John C. Breckinridge, left for Washington that night, crossing the Savannah river on a pontoon bridge, stopping for breakfast and to feed horses a few miles from Washington. Colonel Burton N. Harrison had previously left the party to join Mrs. Davis and her family. At our breakfast halt, when the road was taken, Mr. Benjamin came to me and said good-by, as he did not intend to go farther with the party, and turned off south from that point. I never saw him again, though traveling on his track over 400 miles. Mr. Mallory left the party at Washington, Ga., going to a
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 11.111
er, and it was left free to the soldiers to decide their own action — the move was to be a voluntary one. The soldiers before this had intuitively grasped the situation. The roads were full of men — paroled soldiers from Lee's and Johnston's armies; escaped men from both, having evaded surrender; men who had been exchanged and had started to join their commands — and north of Abbeville and all the way to Florida, I met men who, being still free to fight, were wending their way to the Mississippi river. I met them on my return from Florida in June, plodding their weary way back to their homes. These belong to the Atlantic States. I traveled with some all the way to Virginia; those belonging to the States west of Georgia were already home again. These men and officers were some of the pick and flower of the Confederate States armies; men who, in the four years desperate struggle, having to fight every nationality under the sun, except the heathen Chinee, were still volunteers. Wh<
Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.111
partially reorganized and opened, remaining there until the 10th of April, when the news of General R. E. Lee's surrender was received. The next move was to Greensboro, N. C., the headquarters of General G. T. Beauregard's little army. A stay of some days was made there, during which General J. E. Johnston reported for a conferenartment resumed these sales, the rate there being $70 for $1. About $40,000 in silver, generally reported (and no doubt correctly) at $39,000, was left at Greensboro, N. C., as a military chest for the forces there, under charge of the Treasurer, Mr. John C. Hendren; all of the balance was turned into my hands, which amounted, in gold and silver coin, gold and silver bullion, to $288,022.90. Adding the $39,000 left at Greensboro, N. C., the Treasury contained in coin and bullion when it left Danville, Va., $327,022.90. If the Treasury at Richmond had contained $2,500,000 in coin certainly the brave men of our armies would never have suffered so severel
Abbeville, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.111
of President Lincoln), the route was taken to Abbeville, S. C. At Charlotte a large accession was made to theGeneral John C. Breckinridge. We arrived at Abbeville, S. C., the morning of the 2nd of May. Mr. Haldeman watriotic family, the Monroes, of Kentucky. At Abbeville, S. C., the Treasury officers reported the train at tThat during the night of the 3d, en route from Abbeville, S. C., to Washington, Ga., he found the cavalry and in requisition. J. M. Foster, Major, C. S. Abbeville, S. C., May 3, 1865. Assistant Paymaster J. F. Whelese employed in guarding the specie from Richmond to Abbeville, as shown by the accompanying petitions and list oPresident Davis's party. They found it at Abbeville, South Carolina, rode away and left it there, and rode awat meeting, which could be called such, was held at Abbeville on the 2d of May, at which it seems to have been d had started to join their commands — and north of Abbeville and all the way to Florida, I met men who, being s
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.111
nt's party was captured a few days afterward, and upon their release from prison several of the party told me that every one was robbed of all they had, except Colonel F. R. Lubbock, who, after stout resistance and great risk, retained his money, upon which the party subsisted during their long imprisonment at Fort Delaware. No gold was found on President Davis when captured, for he had none.--He could only have received it through me, and I paid him none. Mr. Trenholm was left sick in South Carolina. Attorney-General Davis was left at Charlotte, N. C. Mr. Benjamin left us before reaching Washington, Ga., and Mr. Mallory at Washington. I paid the members of the Cabinet nothing, except to General Breckinridge, and his receipt quoted shows the character of that payment. The only money Judge Reagan received was the money mentioned above, near Sandersville — which was a deposit, not a payment. The Treasury train was never with President Davis's party. They found it at Abbeville, Sout
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