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Kelly's Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.99
for some time, and Stoneman was allowed to waste two weeks in looking at it, when a day's march would have placed him high enough up the stream to have crossed without difficulty, where only scouts and pickets could have opposed him. At length, on April 27th, Hooker (after having for some days made demonstrations down the Rappahannock, opposite Lee's right, in order to deceive his enemy,) began his movements in earnest. Three corps--Eleventh, Twelfth and Fifth--were moved up the river to Kelly's Ford. Here they crossed on the 29th, and proceeded towards Germanna and Ely's fords, on the Rapidan. Stoneman, with the mass of his cavalry, set out on the same day from Kelly's, on his way to the Confederate rear. By 2 P. M., on Thursday, April 30th, the three infantry corps had reached Chancellorsville, where they were joined the same evening by two-thirds of the Second corps, which had crossed at United States ford. The Third corps was next ordered up from Fredericksburg, and reached Ch
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.99
self present. Sickles's movements were feeble in the extreme, for Jackson's rear, composed of a few batteries and two small brigades (subseqe Federal right, under Howard, with his usual impetuosity. Though Jackson's movement had, for ten hours, been known to the Federal commander battle. Sickles is quickly recalled from his fancied attack on Jackson's rear, to protect his own, and Pleasanton makes a brilliant dash arkness. At dawn the battle is renewed. Stuart, now commanding Jackson's corps, leads it with reckless valor against the Federal lines, wion invited another bold attack. Lee decided to leave Stuart with Jackson's corps, now reduced to twenty thousand men, to watch and hold in is the only man I would follow blindfold. Said Lee, on hearing of Jackson's wound, He has lost his left arm, but I have lost my right. Thesess of purpose, true courage, rare ability, suffice to account for Jackson's military success. But those alone who have served under his eye
Jackson County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.99
The campaign of Chancellorsville — by Theodore A. Dodge, United States army. A Review by Colonel William Allan, Late of Jackson's Staff. Colonel Dodge has given us a most excellent book. Amidst the mass of rubbish yearly printed about the war, it is refreshing to find an author more anxious to get at the truth than to glorify comrades, or vilify his foes; an author with the honesty, intelligence and patience to pick out the facts from the confused and often conflicting testimony, and the ability to state them clearly and fairly. Colonel Dodge is entitled to the thanks of all fair-minded men belonging to both sides in the late war, for an intelligent and comprehensive discussion of the Chancellorsville campaign, in which the merits and failures of the respective combatants are stated with impartiality, the plans of the opposing leaders criticized in a fair spirit, and the skill and gallantry of Confederate and Federal alike recognized. This book is a valuable contribution to hi
Devonshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11.99
d the general direction of his march; though Hooker had warned Howard early in the day to be on his guard from a possible flank attack; though pickets and scouts had informed Howard in the middle of the afternoon that the Confederates were in force on the Orange Plank-road, entirely on his flank, yet, at 6 P. M., in broad daylight, Howard is completely surprised, his lines taken in flank and rear, while his men are for the most part at supper, with arms stacked. The first division met with (Devon's) is quickly routed. Colonel Dodge says he lost 1,600 out of 4,000 men, and nearly all his superior officers, in a brief ten minutes. Schutz's division is next overwhelmed, and adds to the fearful panic. Bushbeck's brigade, of Steinwher's division, attempts to stay the rout, but is soon carried away. In an hour Howard's 10,000 men have been scattered in disgraceful flight, and without the semblance of organization, are carrying dismay in every direction through the Federal army. Colone
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 11.99
earnest. Three corps--Eleventh, Twelfth and Fifth--were moved up the river to Kelly's Ford. Here they crossed on the 29th, and proceeded towards Germanna and Ely's fords, on the Rapidan. Stoneman, with the mass of his cavalry, set out on the same day from Kelly's, on his way to the Confederate rear. By 2 P. M., on Thursday, April 30th, the three infantry corps had reached Chancellorsville, where they were joined the same evening by two-thirds of the Second corps, which had crossed at United States ford. The Third corps was next ordered up from Fredericksburg, and reached Chancellorsville before midday on Friday, May 1st. Thus Hooker was rapidly concentrating over seventy thousand men at Chancellorsville, on Lee's flank. Meantime, the First and Sixth corps, and Gibbons's division of the Second, had been left at Fredericksburg under Sedgwick, to make demonstrations and distract the enemy. Pontoons had been laid down at Burnside's old crossing places, and troops thrown over the r
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.99
wers of organization. He was strict in discipline, and a careful organizer. His judgment of men was often bad, but no one, we believe, ever held subordinates to a stricter accountability, and no one ever obtained more and better work from those under him. To his mind, nothing ever fully excused failure, and it was but rarely that he gave an officer the opportunity of failing twice. Jackson used to say, The service cannot afford to keep in position a man who does not succeed. Nor was he ever restrained from change by the fear of making matters worse. His motto was: Get rid of the inefficient man at once, and trust Providence for finding a better. Colonel Dodge well says: Honesty, singleness of purpose, true courage, rare ability, suffice to account for Jackson's military success. But those alone who have served under his eye know to what depths that rarer, stranger power of his has sounded them. They only can testify to the full measure of the strength of Stonewall Jackson.
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.99
e north side of the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg, within a dozen miles by railroad of the P The Third corps was next ordered up from Fredericksburg, and reached Chancellorsville before middas division of the Second, had been left at Fredericksburg under Sedgwick, to make demonstrations and under Early to hold the lines in front of Fredericksburg, and keep Sedgwick in check, he decided to on Thursday. He did not move out towards Fredericksburg until 11 A. M., Friday, thus wasting nearl the First corps, had been brought up from Fredericksburg on Saturday, thus making over 90,000 troopas depending upon Sedgwick to advance from Fredericksburg and strike the Confederate rear. Sedgwickbefore Sedgwick was ready to move out from Fredericksburg. It was 11 A. M. before Sedgwick was ablesville. At Salem Church, half way between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Wilcox held him in cmen, which had broken through his lines at Fredericksburg, and advanced within a few miles of Hooker
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.99
The campaign of Chancellorsville — by Theodore A. Dodge, United States army. A Review by Colonel Wtion of the Army of Northern Virginia, on Chancellorsville); his only avenue of supply the Richmond dered up from Fredericksburg, and reached Chancellorsville before midday on Friday, May 1st. Thus Hes. Berry's division is fortunately near Chancellorsville, and is rapidly sent forward to check, ifuch that the battle was already raging at Chancellorsville before Sedgwick was ready to move out frovery cautiously up the plank road towards Chancellorsville. At Salem Church, half way between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Wilcox held him in check until McLaws arrived with four brigades, abning. Hooker remained in his trenches at Chancellorsville all day, held inactive by Stuart's twenty ordered a concentration of his troops at Chancellorsville, with the intention of throwing his wholeighting since Friday morning, returned to Chancellorsville. Before they reached it a violent rain-s[6 more...]
Zachary Taylor (search for this): chapter 11.99
defeat. General Hooker's outlook, at the beginning of the Chancellorsville campaign, was highly favorable. He had over 130,000 well-drilled and well-equipped soldiers, the mass of them trained to war in the great struggle of 1862. He lay on the north side of the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg, within a dozen miles by railroad of the Potomac and his depots of supply. In his front, on the south side of the river, was General Lee, with less than 55,000 men (see official reports in Taylor's Four years with General Lee, and General Fitzhugh Lee's address before the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, on Chancellorsville); his only avenue of supply the Richmond and Fredericksburg railroad, sixty miles in length, already in so worn-out a condition that it was impossible to accumulate more than a few days' supplies ahead. Limited means of transportation from the South, and the exhaustion of supplies near at hand had reduced his army to short rations, and the want of fo
Robert H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 11.99
o hold the lines in front of Fredericksburg, and keep Sedgwick in check, he decided to move out at once with the remainder of his army and give Hooker battle. Anderson's division was already on Hooker's front. McLaws was ordered to move to Anderson's support, followed by Jackson. The troops were moving during the night of ThuAnderson's support, followed by Jackson. The troops were moving during the night of Thursday, and by 8 A. M. Friday Jackson had reached the Confederate front near Chancellors-ville, and assumed command until General Lee, at a later hour, reached the field. As soon as the Confederates met the advancing Federals they were formed in line and ordered forward. The Federal skirmishers were driven in, and the heads of thhe Federal army, and attack its right flank and rear. Jackson began this manoeuvre in the early morning, taking some 26,000 infantry, while General Lee retained Anderson's and McLaw's divisions, amounting to 16,000 or 17,000 men, opposite Hooker's center and left wing. All day was consumed by Jackson in moving around the front o
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