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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Tunnel Hill (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.10
Report of General M. P. Lowry of battle of Taylor's Ridge. Headquarters Lowry's brigade, Tunnel Hill, December 3, 1863. Captain I. A. Buck, A. A. General: Sir,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade, on Taylor's Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the morning Major-General Cleburne called on me for my smallest regiment, to be placed on the mountain to the left of the gap, through which the railroad and wagon road passed, leading out from Ringgold in the direction of Tunnel Hill. I sent the Sixteenth Alabama regiment and Captain Palmer, A. A. General, to place them in position. My other three regiments were then placed in the gap. After the skirmishing had commenced between Smith's brigade and the enemy, Major-General Cleburne informed me that the enemy was moving in force to his right and he wished me to go on the ridge to the right and protect his right flank. I moved my brigade at once by the right flan
Taylor's Ridge (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.10
Report of General M. P. Lowry of battle of Taylor's Ridge. Headquarters Lowry's brigade, Tunnel Hill, December 3, 1863. Captain I. A. Buck, A. A. General: Sir,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade, on Taylor's Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the morning Major-General Cleburne called on me for my smallest regiment, to be placed on the mountain to the left of the gap, through which the railroad and wagon road passedTaylor's Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the morning Major-General Cleburne called on me for my smallest regiment, to be placed on the mountain to the left of the gap, through which the railroad and wagon road passed, leading out from Ringgold in the direction of Tunnel Hill. I sent the Sixteenth Alabama regiment and Captain Palmer, A. A. General, to place them in position. My other three regiments were then placed in the gap. After the skirmishing had commenced between Smith's brigade and the enemy, Major-General Cleburne informed me that the enemy was moving in force to his right and he wished me to go on the ridge to the right and protect his right flank. I moved my brigade at once by the right flank,
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.10
P. Lowry of battle of Taylor's Ridge. Headquarters Lowry's brigade, Tunnel Hill, December 3, 1863. Captain I. A. Buck, A. A. General: Sir,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade, on Taylor's Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the morning Major-General Cleburne called on me for my smallest regiment, to be placed on the mountain to the left of the gap, through which the railroad and wagon road passed, leading out from Ringgold in the direction of Tunnel Hill. I sent the Sixteenth Alabama regiment and Captain Palmer, A. A. General, to place them in position. My other three regiments were then placed in the gap. After the skirmishing had commenced between Smith's brigade and the enemy, Major-General Cleburne informed me that the enemy was moving in force to his right and he wished me to go on the ridge to the right and protect his right flank. I moved my brigade at once by the right flank, and after ascending th
P. R. Cleburne (search for this): chapter 2.10
nnel Hill, December 3, 1863. Captain I. A. Buck, A. A. General: Sir,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade, on Taylor's Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the morning Major-General Cleburne called on me for my smallest regiment, to be placed on the mountain to the left of the gap, through which the railroad and wagon road passed, leading out from Ringgold in the direction of Tunnel Hill. I sent the Sixteenth Alabama regiment and Captain Palmer, A. A. General, to place them in position. My other three regiments were then placed in the gap. After the skirmishing had commenced between Smith's brigade and the enemy, Major-General Cleburne informed me that the enemy was moving in force to his right and he wished me to go on the ridge to the right and protect his right flank. I moved my brigade at once by the right flank, and after ascending the hill I heard firing several hundred yards to the right, and, leaving a st
Irving A. Buck (search for this): chapter 2.10
Report of General M. P. Lowry of battle of Taylor's Ridge. Headquarters Lowry's brigade, Tunnel Hill, December 3, 1863. Captain I. A. Buck, A. A. General: Sir,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade, on Taylor's Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the morning Major-General Cleburne called on me for my smallest regiment, to be placed on the mountain to the left of the gap, through which the railroad and wagon road passed, leading out from Ringgold in the direction of Tunnel Hill. I sent the Sixteenth Alabama regiment and Captain Palmer, A. A. General, to place them in position. My other three regiments were then placed in the gap. After the skirmishing had commenced between Smith's brigade and the enemy, Major-General Cleburne informed me that the enemy was moving in force to his right and he wished me to go on the ridge to the right and protect his right flank. I moved my brigade at once by the right flank,
M. P. Lowry (search for this): chapter 2.10
Report of General M. P. Lowry of battle of Taylor's Ridge. Headquarters Lowry's brigade, Tunnel Hill, December 3, 1863. Captain I. A. Buck, A. A. General: Sir,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade, on Taylor's Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the mornLowry's brigade, Tunnel Hill, December 3, 1863. Captain I. A. Buck, A. A. General: Sir,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade, on Taylor's Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the morning Major-General Cleburne called on me for my smallest regiment, to be placed on the mountain to the left of the gap, through which the railroad and wagon road passed, leading out from Ringgold in the direction of Tunnel Hill. I sent the Sixteenth Alabama regiment and Captain Palmer, A. A. General, to place them in position. My , by their promptness and great gallantry. I was deprived of the valuable services of Captain O. S. Palmer, until near the close of the engagement, he being with the Sixteenth Alabama regiment. For the performance of this regiment please see report of Major Ashford. Respectfully submitted, M. P. Lowry, Brigadier General.
hat support was at hand, and directing them to hold their position, I hastened to the head of my brigade, which was coming up the ridge at a double quick, with the right flank to the enemy, and the bullets from the enemy's guns already flying down the line. I knew that nothing but the most prompt and rapid movement could save the position, and that I could not take time to put the whole brigade in position before moving upon the enemy. Hence in reaching the head of the column, composed of Hawkins's Sharp-Shooters, and the Thirty-second and Forty-fifth regiment, I commanded--By company into line, and deployed the column on the Tenth company, continuing the movement to the front with all possible rapidity. At the same time I sent Lieutenant Hall, my aid-de-camp, to bring up the next regiment in the same manner, and I went with the first to their important work, and nobly did they perform it. Our spirited fire, the sight of reinforcements, and a terrific Rebel yell, combined to strike
kins's Sharp-Shooters, and the Thirty-second and Forty-fifth regiment, I commanded--By company into line, and deployed the column on the Tenth company, continuing the movement to the front with all possible rapidity. At the same time I sent Lieutenant Hall, my aid-de-camp, to bring up the next regiment in the same manner, and I went with the first to their important work, and nobly did they perform it. Our spirited fire, the sight of reinforcements, and a terrific Rebel yell, combined to strik which was done in good order. The whole command behaved with great gallantry, and inflicted a heavy loss upon the enemy. My loss was slight, but four killed and thirty-five wounded. My staff officers present, Captain J. P. Walker and Lieutenant A. P. Hall, rendered me great assistance in this expeditious movement, by their promptness and great gallantry. I was deprived of the valuable services of Captain O. S. Palmer, until near the close of the engagement, he being with the Sixteenth Ala
J. P. Walker (search for this): chapter 2.10
re just in time to save the position. When my ammunition was nearly exhausted, and I had sent for more, my men and officers gave me assurance, with great enthusiasm, that they would hold the position at the point of the bayonet and with clubbed muskets if the enemy dared charge them. The position was held until I was ordered to retire from it, which was done in good order. The whole command behaved with great gallantry, and inflicted a heavy loss upon the enemy. My loss was slight, but four killed and thirty-five wounded. My staff officers present, Captain J. P. Walker and Lieutenant A. P. Hall, rendered me great assistance in this expeditious movement, by their promptness and great gallantry. I was deprived of the valuable services of Captain O. S. Palmer, until near the close of the engagement, he being with the Sixteenth Alabama regiment. For the performance of this regiment please see report of Major Ashford. Respectfully submitted, M. P. Lowry, Brigadier General.
Henry Smith (search for this): chapter 2.10
Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the morning Major-General Cleburne called on me for my smallest regiment, to be placed on the mountain to the left of the gap, through which the railroad and wagon road passed, leading out from Ringgold in the direction of Tunnel Hill. I sent the Sixteenth Alabama regiment and Captain Palmer, A. A. General, to place them in position. My other three regiments were then placed in the gap. After the skirmishing had commenced between Smith's brigade and the enemy, Major-General Cleburne informed me that the enemy was moving in force to his right and he wished me to go on the ridge to the right and protect his right flank. I moved my brigade at once by the right flank, and after ascending the hill I heard firing several hundred yards to the right, and, leaving a staff officer to bring up the command, I went in haste to see what it meant. I found the First Arkansas regiment engaging the enemy's skirmishers, who had already gai
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