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West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
think you orter blame me cause my horse kin beat yours a runnina. A roar of laughter greeted this sally, for it was perfectly evident that each man had done his level best in getting away from the whizzing of dem ar things. Meantime the battle raged furiously. Hastening towards the front, I saw the bleeding, mangled form of the gallant Winder, who was mortally wounded just as he was putting in his division and skillfully directing the fire of Poague's and Carpenter's batteries. A West Point officer of rare merit, General C. S. Winder had succeeded General Garnett in the command of the Stonewall brigade, was now in command of the old Stonewall division, and had already won a reputation which opened before him a most brilliant career. Jackson said of him in his official report: It is difficult within the proper reserve of an official report to do justice to the merits of this accomplished officer. Urged by the Medical Director to take no part in the movements of the day,
Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
ucted by the Federal cavalry, who kept up a constant skirmish with our advance guard. Ewell's division led the advance, and as Early's brigade was in front, and my own regiment (the Thirteenth Virginia Infantry) in advance of the brigade, I had a fine opportunity of witnessing the manoeuvering for position and the skirmishing. A little after 12 o'clock our brigade was halted at a school-house on the road, eight miles from Culpeper Courthouse, near Slaughter's Mountain, and not far from Cedar Run. Some time was spent in reconnoitering the position of the enemy, and bringing our own troops into position. There was some sharp controversy at the time between General Pope and General Banks as to who was responsible for bringing on that battle; but if those gentlemen have not yet settled it satisfactorily, I would advise them to call General Early to the stand, and he would testify that neither Pope nor Banks was the responsible party, bat that Early himself brought on the fight by
Harrison's Landing (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
ason of rest, which was greatly enjoyed after the marches, hardships and dangers which we had encountered. But soon the Foot cavalry began to loathe the swamps of the Chickahominy, and sigh for the green fields, fresh breezes, clear streams, buttermilk, and apple-butter of the mountains. They were soon to be gratified. The situation was one of difficulty, and would have greatly perplexed a less sagacious and determined leader than General Lee. McClellan was strongly intrenched at Harrison's Landing, and it was uncertain whether he would advance against Richmond by the north side — cross the river and move on Petersburg — or join the forces which General Pope was collecting in Culpeper. The arrival of this latter General from the West and his assuming command of the Army of Virginia was heralded in all of the Northern papers. He came up to his headquarters on a special train decked with flags, streamers and flowers. He had issued his famous order, which afterwards proved so pro
Slaughter Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
ginia, By J. William Jones. Paper no. 9. Cedar Run (Slaughter's Mountain.) After the seven dSlaughter's Mountain.) After the seven days battles around Richmond we had a brief season of rest, which was greatly enjoyed after the marchqualities as a man. Just before the march to Cedar Run I was called to his Headquarters to give himht miles from Culpeper Courthouse, near Slaughter's Mountain, and not far from Cedar Run. Some timepporting batteries splendidly posted on Slaughter's Mountain; Winder, commanding Jackson's old diviss with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpeper Courthouse. s that Old jack gained a splendid victory at Cedar Run (Slaughter's Mountain), and learning that thSlaughter's Mountain), and learning that the enemy had received large reinforcements he waited two days for an attack, and then marched leisure of the fight this gentleman rode up on Slaughter's Mountain, where he was spied by rough old Ewell,we got on the different battles, ending with Cedar Run. A Colonel with whom I was talking finally
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
in Culpeper. The arrival of this latter General from the West and his assuming command of the Army of Virginia was heralded in all of the Northern papers. He came up to his headquarters on a special train decked with flags, streamers and flowers. He had issued his famous order, which afterwards proved so prophetic that I quote it in full, as follows: Washington, July 14, 1862. To the officers and soldiers of the Army of Virginia: By special assignment of the President of the United States, I have assumed command of this army. I have spent two weeks in learning your whereabouts, your condition and your wants, in preparing you for active operations, and in placing you in position from which you can act promptly and to the purpose. I have come from the West, where we have always seen the backs of our enemies, from an army whose business it has been to seek the adversary and to beat him when found, whose policy has been attack and not defense. In but one instance has the en
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
ly, 1862, we broke camp near Richmond and the head of our column moved toward the mountains, the Foot cavalry started off with their old swing and cheers rang along our lines. General Lee had sent Jackson with his own and Ewell's divisions to Gordonsville for the purpose of watching and checking the movements of Pope until McClellan should develop his purpose. We reached Gordonsville on the evening of the 19th July, and found in the vicinage abundant pasturage for our jaded animals, beautiful Gordonsville on the evening of the 19th July, and found in the vicinage abundant pasturage for our jaded animals, beautiful camps for the troops, and the warmest hospitality on the part of the people. I had opportunity at this time of seeing a good deal of General Jackson--sometimes at his headquarters, sometimes in the hospitable homes of the people, and frequently at preaching — and was more than ever impressed with his genius as a soldier and his high qualities as a man. Just before the march to Cedar Run I was called to his Headquarters to give him information concerning the roads between the Rapidan and Louis
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
le force. Accordingly, we broke camp on the afternoon of August 7th, it being Jackson's purpose to reach Culpeper Courthouse very early on the morning of the 9th. ed to be near General Early when Captain A. S. Pendleton, a gallant officer of Jackson's staff, rode up, gave the military salute, and said: General Jackson sends hiorting batteries splendidly posted on Slaughter's Mountain; Winder, commanding Jackson's old division, was moving in column along the main road to support Early, and about seventeen thousand men, with large reinforcements rapidly approaching. Jackson's entire force numbered 18,623 men, but they were veterans, flushed with victomething else save the backs of the enemy. As soon as General Early received Jackson's order, he called for eight picked men of the Thirteenth Virginia, whom he seour side and Lee and Jackson on the other. On the 14th of August we had, by Jackson's orders, deeply interesting thanksgiving services in the army. The battle
ur dead, and collecting arms, ammunition, &c., from the battle-field. Old Stonewall announced his victory by the following characteristic dispatch: August 11th--6 1/2 A. M. On the evening of the 9th instant God blessed our arms with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpeper Courthouse. The enemy, according to statements of prisoners, consisted of Banks's, McDowell's and Siegel's commands. We have over four hundred prisoners, including Brigadier-General Prince. While our list of killed is less than that of the enemy, we have to mourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. * * * We have collected about one thousand five hundred small arms and other ordnance stores. On the morning of the 11th General Banks asked for a truce to enable him to bury his dead. The request was granted, and as Early's brigade on our side had charge of it, I had full opportunity of witnessing the scene, which was indeed a novel one. That night we d
W. D. Pender (search for this): chapter 1.9
olinians, the enemy was repulsed, and the disaster turned into victory. Just at this point in the battle I witnessed the charge of a magnificent column of Federal cavalry, who came forward in a style which excited our highest admiration, and deserved a better fate, for Branch's men repulsed them in front, while Walker threw the Thirteenth Virginia behind a fence and delivered, as they galloped back, a withering fire at very short range, which emptied many a saddle. Jackson now hurried up Pender's and Archer's brigades of A. P. Hill's division, advanced Ewell from the mountain, threw forward his whole line, and, when night put an end to the contest, had driven the enemy two miles, holding the whole battle-field, the enemy's dead and many of his wounded falling into our hands. Jackson had no idea of stopping short of Culpeper Courthouse, and I know personally the fact that guides were detailed from the Culpeper minute men of my regiment to conduct his columns on the proposed night m
E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1.9
le-field, the enemy's dead and many of his wounded falling into our hands. Jackson had no idea of stopping short of Culpeper Courthouse, and I know personally the fact that guides were detailed from the Culpeper minute men of my regiment to conduct his columns on the proposed night march. But the night proved very dark, the cavalry brought information that Banks was receiving heavy reinforcements, and Jackson very reluctantly decided to wait for the morning. The next morning General J. E. B. Stuart reached the army on a tour of inspection (it is shrewdly suspected that Jeb had snuffed the battle from afar, and had come to claim the privilege of going in), and at the request of Jackson made a reconnoissance which fully developed the fact that Pope had already received large reinforcements, and that others were rapidly coming forward. Jackson determined therefore, to await the attack from the enemy; and we spent the 10th in looking after our wounded, burying our dead, and collecting
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