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William H. Payne (search for this): chapter 3.25
tain, as soon as the infantry had charged. The next day, finding that Captain Fraser's command was so much crippled by the loss of men, I placed two of his guns (3-inch rifles) in charge of Captain Manly. These two guns, under command of Lieutenant Payne of Manly's battery, two 3-inch rifles of Captain McCarthy's battery, under command of Lieutenant R. M. Anderson, and two Parrott guns of Captain Fraser's battery, under command of Lieutenant Furlong, were ordered to take position on the new nd Lieutenant Motes were ordered to move forward, and came in position immediately on the road above mentioned, occupying the left flank of the line extended, upon which were placed the sections commanded respectively by Lieutenant Anderson, Lieutenant Payne, and Lieutenant Furlong. One of Lieutenant Furlong's guns being entirely out of ammunition, was ordered to the rear, and the other piece was placed about 300 yards on the left of his previous position. The enemy's sharpshooters were continu
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 3.25
eded in diverting their fire. On the third day Major Richardson was ordered to the position held by Major-General Anderson's division, and to the right of Major Pegram's battalion. Towards the close of the day, in obedience to orders from General Longstreet, he placed his guns in position under fire at this point, but did not fire a single shot, having received orders to that effect. The remaining six guns (four Napoleons and two howitzers) bore no part in these actions, although they were uped the enemy at about 6 A. M., near the suburbs of Frankstown, and fought him from that position until late in the afternoon, compelling his artillery to change positions twice during the engagement. Captain Manly was then ordered by Lieutenant-General Longstreet to report with four guns to Major-General Pickett. He rejoined the battalion after we recrossed the Potomac. Lieutenant Dunn, of this battery, with one gun, remained with the battalion. On the 7th of July First Lieutenant R. M. A
W. V. Pendleton (search for this): chapter 3.25
n reaching the Virginia shore I was ordered to place six of my pieces (two Napoleons and four rifles) in position on the hills to the left of the turnpike and commanding the pontoon bridge, which I accordingly did, and very soon thereafter, General Pendleton being present, they opened upon the enemy's skirmishers and checked their advance upon the bridge. These pieces kept up an irregular fire until evening, when I ordered them to cease firing, the enemy evincing no intention of attempting to exposed to rain nearly every day, they bore the difficulties of the march without a murmur of dissatisfaction. All seemed engaged in a cause which made privation, endurance and any sacrifice a labor of love. Very respectfully, H. C. Cabell, Colonel Commanding. General W. V. Pendleton, Chief of Artillery, A. N. V.: General,--This report not having been finished before Colonel Walton left Virginia, is respectfully forwarded to you. Very respectfully, H. C. Cabell, Colonel Commanding.
ted the road leading from Gettysburg to Emmettsburg. The line of artillery extended up the road for some distance. Captain Carlton's battery and a section of Captain McCarthy's battery (two Napoleons) were ordered to the left of the line, in fronty. During this cannonading, Lieutenant Jennings, a brave and gallant officer, fell wounded, and later in the day, Captain Carlton, who has in action so gallantly commanded his battery, fell also wounded. The command of the battery fell upon, andh him until about 9 A. M. the following day, when, by order, he reported to the battalion. Lieutenant Motes, commanding Carlton's battery, reported to Brigadier-General Wofford on the morning of the 10th, and was placed in position on the left of tg; 13 horses killed and 7 disabled. In McCarthy's battery, 2 killed and 8 wounded; 23 horses killed and 2 disabled. In Carlton's battery, 1 killed, 2 officers and 3 enlisted men wounded; 13 horses killed and 4 wounded (disabled, but for a short ti
Carlton McCarthy (search for this): chapter 3.25
d of Lieutenant Payne of Manly's battery, two 3-inch rifles of Captain McCarthy's battery, under command of Lieutenant R. M. Anderson, and twofor some distance. Captain Carlton's battery and a section of Captain McCarthy's battery (two Napoleons) were ordered to the left of the linethe interval being occupied by batteries of other battalions. Captain McCarthy had, early in the morning, been placed three or four hundred ysion was ordered back from their assault on the Cemetery Hill, Captain McCarthy and Lieutenant Motes were ordered to move forward, and came inttalion. On the 7th of July First Lieutenant R. M. Anderson, of McCarthy's battery, was ordered to take command of Captain Fraser's batterye drawing the burning fuze from the shell with his fingers. Captain McCarthy pays the following high but no less deserved tribute to Corporounded, and four (4) missing; 13 horses killed and 7 disabled. In McCarthy's battery, 2 killed and 8 wounded; 23 horses killed and 2 disabled
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 3.25
t Stanard's farm, about ten miles in the rear of Fredericksburg, on June 3d. Camped near Culpeper Courthouse June 7th. Remained near Culpeper Courthouse till the 16th. Were ordered to accompany the division to meet the enemy, who were pressing Stuart's cavalry at Brandy Station. The enemy did not advance, being driven off as it seemed by the appearance of our forces. On the 16th resumed the march. We arrived at Ashby's Gap on the 19th, and camped on the mountain. There being some fightingvening, and camped about one mile from the town. On the 8th of July Captain Manly's battery was ordered to picket near Frankstown, Md., on the Antietam. On Friday, July 10th, this battery crossed the Antietam and went to the assistance of General Stuart's cavalry. They engaged the enemy at about 6 A. M., near the suburbs of Frankstown, and fought him from that position until late in the afternoon, compelling his artillery to change positions twice during the engagement. Captain Manly was t
at the same time drawing the burning fuze from the shell with his fingers. Captain McCarthy pays the following high but no less deserved tribute to Corporal Allan Morton, who fell on the 3d of July: In Corporal Allan Morton, the battery lost its best and bravest soldier, one who had endeared himself to all by his unflinching bravery, his strict attention to all duties, and his cheerful obedience to all orders. Lieutenant Furlong says that he was much indebted to Corporals Campbell and Kernan for the manner in which they managed their respective pieces. The battalion sustained the following casualties: In Manly's battery, 3 killed, 4 wounded, and four (4) missing; 13 horses killed and 7 disabled. In McCarthy's battery, 2 killed and 8 wounded; 23 horses killed and 2 disabled. In Carlton's battery, 1 killed, 2 officers and 3 enlisted men wounded; 13 horses killed and 4 wounded (disabled, but for a short time, one.) In Fraser's battery, 6 killed, 2 officers and 11 enlisted men
ery, under command of Lieutenant R. M. Anderson, and two Parrott guns of Captain Fraser's battery, under command of Lieutenant Furlong, were ordered to take position on the new and advanced line of battle. These guns were placed several hundred ya extended, upon which were placed the sections commanded respectively by Lieutenant Anderson, Lieutenant Payne, and Lieutenant Furlong. One of Lieutenant Furlong's guns being entirely out of ammunition, was ordered to the rear, and the other piece waLieutenant Furlong's guns being entirely out of ammunition, was ordered to the rear, and the other piece was placed about 300 yards on the left of his previous position. The enemy's sharpshooters were continually firing and annoying us. Only a few of our pickets were in front of us. No infantry in sight in our rear, but Anderson's division was in the wooto all by his unflinching bravery, his strict attention to all duties, and his cheerful obedience to all orders. Lieutenant Furlong says that he was much indebted to Corporals Campbell and Kernan for the manner in which they managed their respecti
port as follows: On the morning of the 15th of June, in obedience to your orders, I withdrew my command from the position it had occupied on Lee's Hill since the 6th inst., to the rear, immediately on the Telegraph road, and reported to Major-General Heth for duty with his division. At 2 o'clock P. M. I moved with Heth's division from Fredericksburg and accompanied this command on its daily marches through the Maryland and Pennsylvania campaign, until the morning of the 1st of July, when I Heth's division from Fredericksburg and accompanied this command on its daily marches through the Maryland and Pennsylvania campaign, until the morning of the 1st of July, when I was relieved and became directly subject to your orders. The commencement of the battles around Gettysburg found my battalion at Cashtown, Pa., where it had arrived the previous evening from near Fayetteville, Pa. About 11 o'clock A. M. on the morning of the 1st of July, I received orders to bring up my command within supporting distance on the Gettysburg pike, which I reached after the battle had been in progress for several hours. On reaching the scene of action, as directed, I halted my b
ng of the 20th. The division recrossed the river accompanied by Capt. Fraser's battery on the 21st. Subsequently the rest of the battalion mhe loss of my battalion was very heavy during the cannonading. Captain Fraser, who had always in previous engagements as in this, set an examsoon as the infantry had charged. The next day, finding that Captain Fraser's command was so much crippled by the loss of men, I placed twor command of Lieutenant R. M. Anderson, and two Parrott guns of Captain Fraser's battery, under command of Lieutenant Furlong, were ordered toAnderson, of McCarthy's battery, was ordered to take command of Captain Fraser's battery; owing to the wounds received by Captain Fraser and LCaptain Fraser and Lieutenant Cooper, this battery had been left with only one officer. On the morning of the 10th the battery was ordered to report to Brigadierrses killed and 4 wounded (disabled, but for a short time, one.) In Fraser's battery, 6 killed, 2 officers and 11 enlisted men wounded; 18 hor
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