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cavalry, crossed the Shenandoah the evening of the 20th. The division recrossed the river accompanied by Capt. Fraser's battery on the 21st. Subsequently the rest of the battalion moved across the Shenandoah and took position at Ashby's Gap, where we again camped. On the 22d we again crossed the Shenandoah, and resuming our march on the 24th, on the 26th crossed the Potomac. We camped a mile beyond Chambersburg on the 28th. On July 1st we camped a few miles from Gettysburg, and on the 2d of July moved up with the division. When we commenced to ascend the road leading to the crest of the hill, where the battle was subsequently fought, my battalion moved to the head of the column. Near the crest of the hill I turned to the right and placed the battalion in position on the edge of the wood, the right resting near the road leading from Gettysburg to Emmettsburg. One horse was wounded while crossing the field, although this movement was made beyond the view of the enemy. On our rig
ntion to an act of coolness by Private H. E. Thair, by which many lives were probably saved. Thair was acting No 6 at one of the guns, and while adjusting a fuze-igniter it accidentally exploded and ignited the fuze already in the shell, he seized the shell and ran with it several yard from the limber, at the same time drawing the burning fuze from the shell with his fingers. Captain McCarthy pays the following high but no less deserved tribute to Corporal Allan Morton, who fell on the 3d of July: In Corporal Allan Morton, the battery lost its best and bravest soldier, one who had endeared himself to all by his unflinching bravery, his strict attention to all duties, and his cheerful obedience to all orders. Lieutenant Furlong says that he was much indebted to Corporals Campbell and Kernan for the manner in which they managed their respective pieces. The battalion sustained the following casualties: In Manly's battery, 3 killed, 4 wounded, and four (4) missing; 13 horses kill
August 2nd, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 3.25
The Artillery on the Gettysburg campaign. Report of Lieutenant Colonel J. J. Garnett. Headquarters Garnett's battalion light Artillery, Camp near Gordonsville, Va., Aug. 2, 1863. Colonel,--In obedience to your circular dated July 29th, 1863, directing me to make and forward to these (your) headquarters, as soon as possible, an official report of the operations of your (my) battalion of artillery from the time it left Fredericksburg to the present time, I have the honor to report as follows: On the morning of the 15th of June, in obedience to your orders, I withdrew my command from the position it had occupied on Lee's Hill since the 6th inst., to the rear, immediately on the Telegraph road, and reported to Major-General Heth for duty with his division. At 2 o'clock P. M. I moved with Heth's division from Fredericksburg and accompanied this command on its daily marches through the Maryland and Pennsylvania campaign, until the morning of the 1st of July, when I was reli
of Colonel H. C. Cabell. camp Cabell's battalion, near Culpeper C. H., August 7th, 1863. Colonel J. B. Walton, Chief of Artillery first Corps, A. N. V.: Colonel,--In compliance with your order at the earliest period to make a report of the operations of my battalion from the time it left the Rappahannock for Maryland and Pennsylvania to its return, I have the honor to submit the following report: The battalion left Stanard's farm, about ten miles in the rear of Fredericksburg, on June 3d. Camped near Culpeper Courthouse June 7th. Remained near Culpeper Courthouse till the 16th. Were ordered to accompany the division to meet the enemy, who were pressing Stuart's cavalry at Brandy Station. The enemy did not advance, being driven off as it seemed by the appearance of our forces. On the 16th resumed the march. We arrived at Ashby's Gap on the 19th, and camped on the mountain. There being some fighting between the cavalry, crossed the Shenandoah the evening of the 20th.
ville, Va., Aug. 2, 1863. Colonel,--In obedience to your circular dated July 29th, 1863, directing me to make and forward to these (your) headquarters, as soon as possible, an official report of the operations of your (my) battalion of artillery from the time it left Fredericksburg to the present time, I have the honor to report as follows: On the morning of the 15th of June, in obedience to your orders, I withdrew my command from the position it had occupied on Lee's Hill since the 6th inst., to the rear, immediately on the Telegraph road, and reported to Major-General Heth for duty with his division. At 2 o'clock P. M. I moved with Heth's division from Fredericksburg and accompanied this command on its daily marches through the Maryland and Pennsylvania campaign, until the morning of the 1st of July, when I was relieved and became directly subject to your orders. The commencement of the battles around Gettysburg found my battalion at Cashtown, Pa., where it had arrived th
ing morning. At 3 o'clock P. M., when the engagement became general, these pieces opened fire upon the enemy's batteries opposite, which they kept up, without cessation, until about thirty minutes before sunset. Just as the sun had disappeared behind the horizon the enemy's guns were observed to be turned upon a portion of General Ewell's forces, which had attacked them in the rear, when Major Richardson, by opening upon them with his nine rifles, succeeded in diverting their fire. On the third day Major Richardson was ordered to the position held by Major-General Anderson's division, and to the right of Major Pegram's battalion. Towards the close of the day, in obedience to orders from General Longstreet, he placed his guns in position under fire at this point, but did not fire a single shot, having received orders to that effect. The remaining six guns (four Napoleons and two howitzers) bore no part in these actions, although they were upon the field in readiness whenever they
ingle shot, having received orders to that effect. The remaining six guns (four Napoleons and two howitzers) bore no part in these actions, although they were upon the field in readiness whenever they should be called upon. On the morning of the 4th, however, I placed them in the position occupied by the rifle pieces on the second day, where they remained until night, when they were recalled to take their position in the line of march for Hagerstown. On the 4th inst., Major Richardson was 4th inst., Major Richardson was ordered to report to General Imboden, in charge of the wagon train, with the three rifle-pieces of Company B, and the two rifles of Company D, which were thus temporarily detached from the battalion. Major Richardson being absent at Culpeper C. H., under orders, I am unable to make at present an official report of the operations of that portion of the battalion under his command, but will forward it as soon as I can communicate with him. It may not be improper here to state that three of these
August 7th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 3.25
es in detail I have already sent you. The casualties in my command are as follows: Severely wounded, two enlisted men; slightly wounded, three enlisted men; missing, supposed to be in the hands of the enemy, fourteen enlisted men. Respectfully submitted, John J. Garnett, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding Battalion Artillery. Colonel R. L. Walker, Chief Artillery Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Report of Colonel H. C. Cabell. camp Cabell's battalion, near Culpeper C. H., August 7th, 1863. Colonel J. B. Walton, Chief of Artillery first Corps, A. N. V.: Colonel,--In compliance with your order at the earliest period to make a report of the operations of my battalion from the time it left the Rappahannock for Maryland and Pennsylvania to its return, I have the honor to submit the following report: The battalion left Stanard's farm, about ten miles in the rear of Fredericksburg, on June 3d. Camped near Culpeper Courthouse June 7th. Remained near Culpeper Courthouse t
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