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Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.25
, as soon as possible, an official report of the operations of your (my) battalion of artillery from the time it left Fredericksburg to the present time, I have the honor to report as follows: On the morning of the 15th of June, in obedience to y and reported to Major-General Heth for duty with his division. At 2 o'clock P. M. I moved with Heth's division from Fredericksburg and accompanied this command on its daily marches through the Maryland and Pennsylvania campaign, until the morning ort respite I will soon be able to report them as serviceable. I would respectfully state that at the time of leaving Fredericksburg their condition was generally bad, in consequence of the hardships they had encountered during the past winter, togetI have the honor to submit the following report: The battalion left Stanard's farm, about ten miles in the rear of Fredericksburg, on June 3d. Camped near Culpeper Courthouse June 7th. Remained near Culpeper Courthouse till the 16th. Were order
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.25
The Artillery on the Gettysburg campaign. Report of Lieutenant Colonel J. J. Garnett. Headquarters Garnett's battalion light Artillery, Camp near Gordonsville, Va., Aug. 2, 1863. Colonel,--In obedience to your circular dated July 29th, 1863, directing me to make and forward to these (your) headquarters, as soon as possible, an official report of the operations of your (my) battalion of artillery from the time it left Fredericksburg to the present time, I have the honor to report as follows: On the morning of the 15th of June, in obedience to your orders, I withdrew my command from the position it had occupied on Lee's Hill since the 6th inst., to the rear, immediately on the Telegraph road, and reported to Major-General Heth for duty with his division. At 2 o'clock P. M. I moved with Heth's division from Fredericksburg and accompanied this command on its daily marches through the Maryland and Pennsylvania campaign, until the morning of the 1st of July, when I was rel
Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.25
rders to bring up my command within supporting distance on the Gettysburg pike, which I reached after the battle had been in progress for several hours. On reaching the scene of action, as directed, I halted my battalion in column on the side of the road and awaited further orders. After a delay of about an hour, I received a message from Major Pegram, requesting that I relieve one of his batteries whose ammunition had become exhausted. I accordingly sent him Captain V. Maurin, of the Donaldsonville battery, with six of my rifle pieces, which almost immediately opened upon the enemy with apparent effect. These pieces kept up a slow and steady fire for about an hour, when, the enemy having been forced back out of range to the position held by them on the second and third days, together with the other pieces of the command they were advanced to the front in the rear of the line of battle, nearly opposite Cemetery Hill, where they remained in park until the following morning, protecte
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.25
alion was placed in position on this line, on both sides of the road, with orders to fortify it, which was done during the night and the following day. During the evening of the 13th I was ordered to send my caissons across the Potomac and to withdraw my pieces at dark. The order was promptly obeyed, and we recrossed the river without loss on the morning of the 14th. We arrived at Culpeper C. H. on the 25th, having camped successively, near Bunker's Hill, on a farm about ten miles from Winchester, near Millwood, on the left bank of the Shenandoah, at Gaines's Cross-Roads, and on the right bank of Hazel river. During this march, although threatened by the enemy, there was no engagement, and we suffered no loss of any kind. I was much indebted to Major S. R. Hamilton for assistance rendered me on every occasion. I desire to return my thanks to my Ordnance officer, Lieutenant H. L. Powell, and Ordnance-Sergeant O. M. Price, for their efficiency. Lieutenant Powell, though wounded,
Telegraph (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.25
bedience to your circular dated July 29th, 1863, directing me to make and forward to these (your) headquarters, as soon as possible, an official report of the operations of your (my) battalion of artillery from the time it left Fredericksburg to the present time, I have the honor to report as follows: On the morning of the 15th of June, in obedience to your orders, I withdrew my command from the position it had occupied on Lee's Hill since the 6th inst., to the rear, immediately on the Telegraph road, and reported to Major-General Heth for duty with his division. At 2 o'clock P. M. I moved with Heth's division from Fredericksburg and accompanied this command on its daily marches through the Maryland and Pennsylvania campaign, until the morning of the 1st of July, when I was relieved and became directly subject to your orders. The commencement of the battles around Gettysburg found my battalion at Cashtown, Pa., where it had arrived the previous evening from near Fayetteville,
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.25
present an official report of the operations of that portion of the battalion under his command, but will forward it as soon as I can communicate with him. It may not be improper here to state that three of these pieces, the two others having been turned over to Captain Hart on the march in consequence of the horses becoming too weak to pull them, formed a part of the escort of the wagon train under the command of General Imboden, and that they performed good service in the engagement at Williamsport. On reaching Hagerstown the battalion was reunited under Major Richardson, who continued in command until the morning of the day on which the enemy fell back across the Potomac, when I resumed the command. I regret to state that owing to the jaded condition of the horses, which had been but scantily supplied with forage since the 1st of July, during all of which time they had not received a single feed of corn, I was forced to abandon two rifle-pieces belonging to Captain Lewis's ba
Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.25
on the second and third days, together with the other pieces of the command they were advanced to the front in the rear of the line of battle, nearly opposite Cemetery Hill, where they remained in park until the following morning, protected from the enemy's fire by a high hill. On the morning of the second day, having received an order to send all of my rifles to the position immediately opposite Cemetery Hill, and to the right of the Fairfield turnpike, I accordingly dispatched Major Richardson with the nine rifle-pieces of the battalion to the hill indicated, where they remained in position until the following morning. At 3 o'clock P. M., when the engagon occupied the day before, and engaged the mountain batteries particularly with effect. After Pickett's division was ordered back from their assault on the Cemetery Hill, Captain McCarthy and Lieutenant Motes were ordered to move forward, and came in position immediately on the road above mentioned, occupying the left flank of
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.25
ted, John J. Garnett, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding Battalion Artillery. Colonel R. L. Walker, Chief Artillery Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Report of Colonel H. C. Cabell. camp Cabell's battalion, near Culpeper C. H., August 7th, 1863. Colonel J. B. Walton, Chief of Artillery first Corps, A. N. V.: Colonel,--In compliance with your order at the earliest period to make a report of the operations of my battalion from the time it left the Rappahannock for Maryland and Pennsylvania to its return, I have the honor to submit the following report: The battalion left Stanard's farm, about ten miles in the rear of Fredericksburg, on June 3d. Camped near Culpeper Courthouse June 7th. Remained near Culpeper Courthouse till the 16th. Were ordered to accompany the division to meet the enemy, who were pressing Stuart's cavalry at Brandy Station. The enemy did not advance, being driven off as it seemed by the appearance of our forces. On the 16th resumed the march. We
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.25
d been but scantily supplied with forage since the 1st of July, during all of which time they had not received a single feed of corn, I was forced to abandon two rifle-pieces belonging to Captain Lewis's battery, on the night of the retreat from Maryland. Every effort was made to bring them off, but being the rear of the artillery, and before my arrangements could be completed, which were made with all possible dispatch, the enemy's cavalry charged and took them, together with six men and spareH., August 7th, 1863. Colonel J. B. Walton, Chief of Artillery first Corps, A. N. V.: Colonel,--In compliance with your order at the earliest period to make a report of the operations of my battalion from the time it left the Rappahannock for Maryland and Pennsylvania to its return, I have the honor to submit the following report: The battalion left Stanard's farm, about ten miles in the rear of Fredericksburg, on June 3d. Camped near Culpeper Courthouse June 7th. Remained near Culpeper
Fayetteville, Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.25
Telegraph road, and reported to Major-General Heth for duty with his division. At 2 o'clock P. M. I moved with Heth's division from Fredericksburg and accompanied this command on its daily marches through the Maryland and Pennsylvania campaign, until the morning of the 1st of July, when I was relieved and became directly subject to your orders. The commencement of the battles around Gettysburg found my battalion at Cashtown, Pa., where it had arrived the previous evening from near Fayetteville, Pa. About 11 o'clock A. M. on the morning of the 1st of July, I received orders to bring up my command within supporting distance on the Gettysburg pike, which I reached after the battle had been in progress for several hours. On reaching the scene of action, as directed, I halted my battalion in column on the side of the road and awaited further orders. After a delay of about an hour, I received a message from Major Pegram, requesting that I relieve one of his batteries whose ammunition
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