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Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.33
torial paragraphs. Typographical errors are always annoying, and especially when they affect the sense of important historical statements. We believe our printers are generally very accurate, and even where mistakes sometimes creep in it may be the fault of the copy, or of our proof-reading, rather than of the printers. But in our January-February number were some mistakes, which (whether made by the copyist or the printers) ought to be corrected. In General Early's letter about Winchester, he is made to write (page 79) Burntown for Brucetown, and to say that he would have still won the day if our cavalry could have stopped the enemy's, but so overwhelming was the battle, and so demoralized was the larger part of ours, that no assistance was received from it. Battle should have been latter. General Early writes so carefully and accurately, that we are particularly annoyed when mistakes creep into his articles, even when (as in this case) the fault is in the copyist. Capta
Brucetown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.33
s annoying, and especially when they affect the sense of important historical statements. We believe our printers are generally very accurate, and even where mistakes sometimes creep in it may be the fault of the copy, or of our proof-reading, rather than of the printers. But in our January-February number were some mistakes, which (whether made by the copyist or the printers) ought to be corrected. In General Early's letter about Winchester, he is made to write (page 79) Burntown for Brucetown, and to say that he would have still won the day if our cavalry could have stopped the enemy's, but so overwhelming was the battle, and so demoralized was the larger part of ours, that no assistance was received from it. Battle should have been latter. General Early writes so carefully and accurately, that we are particularly annoyed when mistakes creep into his articles, even when (as in this case) the fault is in the copyist. Captain Polk writes us in reference to his article on Chick
ertain of his position, did not attack. Renewals are still in order, and we hope our friends will promptly forward the $3 due us — a small matter to them, but a very important one to us. Lectures for the benefit of the Society will be delivered the last of May or first of June in a number of Southern cities by our gallant and accomplished friend, General Fitz Lee, who has kindly consented to give this additional proof of his devotion to the Society and its interests. We shall be very much mistaken if the several cities to which he goes do not give General Fitz a hearty welcome and a cordial greeting. Contributions to the special fund we are raising have been made by several of our friends, whose names and subscriptions we will publish in due season. Meantime, others who have promised to help, would greatly oblige us by sending the money at their earliest convenience direct to this office; and yet others will be welcomed into this company of willing helpers.
reference to his article on Chickamauga, published in our January-February number: On page 5, in the paragraph relating to the operations of Generals Hill and Hindman against Generals Negley and Baird in McLemore's Cove (September 11th, 1863), I am made to say, By daylight of the 11th September Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond to Hindman's attack, but being uncertain of his position did not attack. * * * It should read, Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond, but Hindman, uncertain of his position, did not attack. Renewals are still in Hindman, uncertain of his position, did not attack. Renewals are still in order, and we hope our friends will promptly forward the $3 due us — a small matter to them, but a very important one to us. Lectures for the benefit of the Society will be delivered the last of May or first of June in a number of Southern cities by our gallant and accomplished friend, General Fitz Lee, who has kindly consen
our January-February number: On page 5, in the paragraph relating to the operations of Generals Hill and Hindman against Generals Negley and Baird in McLemore's Cove (September 11th, 1863), I am made to say, By daylight of the 11th September Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond to Hindman's attack, but being uncertain of his position did not attack. * * * It should read, Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's GapCleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond, but Hindman, uncertain of his position, did not attack. Renewals are still in order, and we hope our friends will promptly forward the $3 due us — a small matter to them, but a very important one to us. Lectures for the benefit of the Society will be delivered the last of May or first of June in a number of Southern cities by our gallant and accomplished friend, General Fitz Lee, who has kindly consented to give this additional proof of his devotion to th
zed was the larger part of ours, that no assistance was received from it. Battle should have been latter. General Early writes so carefully and accurately, that we are particularly annoyed when mistakes creep into his articles, even when (as in this case) the fault is in the copyist. Captain Polk writes us in reference to his article on Chickamauga, published in our January-February number: On page 5, in the paragraph relating to the operations of Generals Hill and Hindman against Generals Negley and Baird in McLemore's Cove (September 11th, 1863), I am made to say, By daylight of the 11th September Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond to Hindman's attack, but being uncertain of his position did not attack. * * * It should read, Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond, but Hindman, uncertain of his position, did not attack. Renewals are still in order, and we hope o
ger part of ours, that no assistance was received from it. Battle should have been latter. General Early writes so carefully and accurately, that we are particularly annoyed when mistakes creep into his articles, even when (as in this case) the fault is in the copyist. Captain Polk writes us in reference to his article on Chickamauga, published in our January-February number: On page 5, in the paragraph relating to the operations of Generals Hill and Hindman against Generals Negley and Baird in McLemore's Cove (September 11th, 1863), I am made to say, By daylight of the 11th September Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond to Hindman's attack, but being uncertain of his position did not attack. * * * It should read, Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond, but Hindman, uncertain of his position, did not attack. Renewals are still in order, and we hope our friends will
* * It should read, Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond, but Hindman, uncertain of his position, did not attack. Renewals are still in order, and we hope our friends will promptly forward the $3 due us — a small matter to them, but a very important one to us. Lectures for the benefit of the Society will be delivered the last of May or first of June in a number of Southern cities by our gallant and accomplished friend, General Fitz Lee, who has kindly consented to give this additional proof of his devotion to the Society and its interests. We shall be very much mistaken if the several cities to which he goes do not give General Fitz a hearty welcome and a cordial greeting. Contributions to the special fund we are raising have been made by several of our friends, whose names and subscriptions we will publish in due season. Meantime, others who have promised to help, would greatly oblige us by sending the mo
Jubal A. Early (search for this): chapter 3.33
sometimes creep in it may be the fault of the copy, or of our proof-reading, rather than of the printers. But in our January-February number were some mistakes, which (whether made by the copyist or the printers) ought to be corrected. In General Early's letter about Winchester, he is made to write (page 79) Burntown for Brucetown, and to say that he would have still won the day if our cavalry could have stopped the enemy's, but so overwhelming was the battle, and so demoralized was the larger part of ours, that no assistance was received from it. Battle should have been latter. General Early writes so carefully and accurately, that we are particularly annoyed when mistakes creep into his articles, even when (as in this case) the fault is in the copyist. Captain Polk writes us in reference to his article on Chickamauga, published in our January-February number: On page 5, in the paragraph relating to the operations of Generals Hill and Hindman against Generals Negley and Ba
ing was the battle, and so demoralized was the larger part of ours, that no assistance was received from it. Battle should have been latter. General Early writes so carefully and accurately, that we are particularly annoyed when mistakes creep into his articles, even when (as in this case) the fault is in the copyist. Captain Polk writes us in reference to his article on Chickamauga, published in our January-February number: On page 5, in the paragraph relating to the operations of Generals Hill and Hindman against Generals Negley and Baird in McLemore's Cove (September 11th, 1863), I am made to say, By daylight of the 11th September Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond to Hindman's attack, but being uncertain of his position did not attack. * * * It should read, Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond, but Hindman, uncertain of his position, did not attack. Renewal
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