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Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.35
, after a month's arduous effort, was about ready to open his powerful batteries, Johnston quietly retreated towards Richmond, and so surprised and disconcerted McClellan, that it was half a day before he could begin the pursuit. (Page 69.) At Williamsburg (May 5) the Confederates found it necessary to check the advance of the Federals, which was pressing their rear. Longstreet and D. H. Hill were halted for this purpose. Longstreet accomplished the end in view handsomely by severely defeatingal Webb greatly exaggerates the Confederate force. (P. 96--see Branch's order above referred to.) At the last of May Johnston thought the time to strike had come. Two of McClellan's corps lay on the south side of the Chickahominy along the Williamsburg road, their advance having been pushed as far as Seven Pines. The remainder of the Federal army was on the north side of that river. The communication between the wings was as yet imperfect, for but few of the numerous bridges McClellan was
Long Bridge (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.35
s below. It was night before the Confederate commander divined McClellan's plans, and issued orders accordingly. On the 29th Longstreet and A. P. Hill were sent to the south side of the Chickahominy. They were, by a circuit, to strike the Long-Bridge road and the flank of the retreating army. McGruder and Huger were to press the rear of the Federals by the Williamsburg and Charles City roads, Jackson to cross the Chickahominy and join in the pursuit. Longstreet was busy all day marching ckson having crossed the Chickahominy, was ordered to follow in its wake towards White Oak Swamp. Huger was directed to press along the Charles City road. Longstreet, with his own and A. P. Hill's divisions, was to attack its flank along the Long-Bridge road. Nearer the James, Holmes was advancing along the River road. Magruder was directed to make a circuit around Huger and follow Longstreet. Jackson soon reached White Oak Swamp and found the passage of this difficult stream strongly de
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.35
s.) Huger's brigades may have numbered 6,000 at this time. Thus the Confederates were able to concentrate about 65,000 men to oppose the 150,000 which were about to unite against them. It would be hard to find a finer illustration of the adage, that fortune favors the brave than occurred at this juncture. Stonewall Jackson, after defeating Fremont's advance in the mountains of West Virginia, and while he was supposed to be one hundred and fifty miles away, suddenly surprised Banks at Front Royal and Winchester, and driving him in confusion and route across the Potomac, advanced to Harper's Ferry. Jackson and his 16,000 men created a marvelous panic at Washington and throughout the North, the accounts of which at this day read like the pages of a romance. The Federal Capitol was believed to be in danger, 300,000 men were called for by the President, the militia of whole States were ordered out, and the proclamations of Governors as far away as Ohio and Massachusetts would not ha
White Oak Swamp (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.35
e whole country was covered with water, and some of the swollen sources of White Oak Swamp caused a delay of many hours in the march of Huger's division. Longstreetat once the movement of the immense trains and material of his army across White Oak Swamp, in the direction of Turkey Bend. The highest commendation that can be ginight-fall, when the Federals made good their retreat to the south side of White Oak Swamp. Next day, June 30th, was the day of greatest peril to the Federal armyhaving crossed the Chickahominy, was ordered to follow in its wake towards White Oak Swamp. Huger was directed to press along the Charles City road. Longstreet, wimake a circuit around Huger and follow Longstreet. Jackson soon reached White Oak Swamp and found the passage of this difficult stream strongly defended by Frankland audacity that characterized his Valley campaign, he would have crossed White Oak Swamp in spite of Franklin. Next day, July 1st, the Confederates, once more r
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 4.35
in confusion and route across the Potomac, advanced to Harper's Ferry. Jackson and his 16,000 men created a marvelous panic at Washington and throughout the North, the accounts of which at this day read like the pages of a romance. The Federal Capitol was believed to be in danger, 300,000 men were called for by the President, the militia of whole States were ordered out, and the proclamations of Governors as far away as Ohio and Massachusetts would not have seemed tame to the Romans after Cannae. The most important result of Jackson's dash was the stoppage of McDowell, who had already begun the movement that in three days would have united him with McClellan. A large part of McDowell's army was ordered back after Jackson, and the remainder was held for the time at Fredericksburg. Relieved by Jackson's success of the fear of McDowell's forces from the North, Johnston, who had determined to attack McClellan before the junction, if possible, postponed his attack until the advance
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.35
James and York, and by means of his works at Yorktown and Gloucester Point, closed the latter riverer, and thus the bay and the York river up to Yorktown were open to the unmolested use of the Federar of Johnston's army from the Rappahannock to Yorktown. Meantime, to Magruder with 11,000 men was aer's line stretched across the Peninsula from Yorktown to Mulberry Point on the James. With 6,000 oorce the handful of Confederates out of their Yorktown lines by regular approaches and siege guns. or Johnston and the bulk of his army to reach Yorktown — long enough for the Confederate Government and of McClellan in reference to the siege of Yorktown. That the administration treated McClellan bhnston showed as great skill in retiring from Yorktown as he and Magruder had shown in defending it.wly and with great caution. The retreat from Yorktown involved the evacuation of Norfolk by the Con. 181) gives McClellan's numbers when he left Yorktown, as 109,335 present for duty. There is no fa
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.35
Peninsula. The brilliant naval victory of the Virginia (March 8) in Hampton Roads closed the James for the time, but the Federal fleet in the lower Chesapeake was able to confine the formidable iron-clad to that river, and thus the bay and the York river up to Yorktown were open to the unmolested use of the Federal commander. By the first of April a large part of McClellan's army was at Fort Monroe and ready to go forward. The closing weeks of March and the early ones of April were anxious se by which Magruder accomplished his task. Magruder's line stretched across the Peninsula from Yorktown to Mulberry Point on the James. With 6,000 of his men he garrisoned the extremities of his line, holding Gloucester Point and closing the York river by his batteries. The other 5,000 held the line of the Warwick creek, which he had converted into a formidable line of defense by the use of all the resources that nature and engineering skill had placed within his reach. On April 2 McClellan
Urbana (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.35
cClellan choose a more southerly line of approach. Johnston continued to maintain a bold front at Manassas, and by various ruses imposed greatly exaggerated notions of his strength upon McClellan to the last moment. To the latter's great surprise he quietly evacuated Manassas on March 9th. This movement of the Confederate army somewhat deranged McClellan's plans. After long discussion, the latter had induced President Lincoln to agree to his plan of transporting the mass of his army to Urbana, on the lower Rappahannock, for an advance thence by way of West Point on Richmond. A main inducement to this plan was that the Federal army might by a rapid movement interpose itself between Richmond and General Johnston. With the Confederates behind the Rappahannock this last could no longer be hoped for, and General McClellan now had recourse to the alternative plan which he had kept in reserve (General Webb calls it a dernier ressort, p. 30) of making his base at Fortress Monroe and ad
Mechums River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.35
the great, the almost incomparable one of 1864; but, nevertheless, it will remain an ever-enduring monument of his military audacity and skill. One of the best chapters in General Webb's book is the last. It is clear, temperate and judicious. One of the worst is that on Malvern Hill, which is disjointed and confused. There are numerous smaller oversights, some of which show haste in preparation or careless proof-reading. Thus Whiting is several times called Whitney (pages 82-134), Mechum's River is called Mechanic's Run (page 122), R. H. Anderson is erroneously put for J. R. Anderson (page 96), Ellison's Mill is called Ellicott's Mill. (Page 126.) Confederate brigades are frequently spoken of as divisions--as Gregg's brigade (page 132), Armistead's brigade. (Page 156.) A. P. Hill's report is misquoted, to make the same mistake on page 150, where Field's and Pender's brigades are turned into divisions. I have noted no mistakes of the opposite kind. On page 187, the Confederate
Seven Pines (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.35
orps lay on the south side of the Chickahominy along the Williamsburg road, their advance having been pushed as far as Seven Pines. The remainder of the Federal army was on the north side of that river. The communication between the wings was as ymarch of Huger's division. Longstreet with his own and D. H. Hill's division was sent out to attack Keyes in front at Seven Pines. Huger was to strike Keyes's left flank, and Johnston himself was to direct G. W. Smith's division against his right he evening and night he ordered the Confederate army back to its late positions in front of Richmond. The battle of Seven Pines, though costing each army about 6,000 men, resulted in little. The plan of the Confederate leader was admirable, but at the end of it. He believed he could best thwart his adversary by attacking him. McClellan had, after the battle of Seven Pines, transferred the bulk of his army to the south side of the Chickahominy, where he reoccupied the ground from which Key
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