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hite Oak Swamp caused a delay of many hours in the march of Huger's division. Longstreet with his own and D. H. Hill's division was sent out to attack Keyes in front at Seven Pines. Huger was to strike Keyes's left flank, and Johnston himself was to direct G. W. Smith's division against his right flank and prevent a retreat towards the Chickahominy. Hours were wasted in waiting for Huger to get into position. Finally, about midday, Longstreet ordered the attack to be made by D. H. Hill. Casey's Federal division was quickly routed and the whole of Keyes's Corps and Kearney's division of Heintzelman's was during the afternoon, defeated and driven from their works and camps to a third line of works a mile or two in the rear. Unfortunately Johnston did not order Smith forward promptly. Longstreet had been two or three hours engaged before General Johnston knew it, and when in the middle of the afternoon Smith was hurried forward to give the coup de grace to Heintzelman, he was just
Robert Edward Lee (search for this): chapter 4.35
t of a battle was seen next day. No concerted, definite plan of operations guided the Confederates on June 1st. Severe but desultory fighting took place between Longstreet's lines and the fresh troops of Hooker's and Richardson's divisions without any decided result, while Smith, now in chief command of the Confederates remained quiet in front of Sumner, though Magruder's large division, which had been unengaged, was at hand. By midday all fighting had ceased. Early in the afternoon General R. E. Lee, was placed in command by President Davis, and during the evening and night he ordered the Confederate army back to its late positions in front of Richmond. The battle of Seven Pines, though costing each army about 6,000 men, resulted in little. The plan of the Confederate leader was admirable, but the execution of it was defective. Too much time was wasted in waiting for Huger; but a more serious fault was the delay in sending forward Smith's division on Longstreet's left. Next
J. B. Magruder (search for this): chapter 4.35
m the Rappahannock to Yorktown. Meantime, to Magruder with 11,000 men was assigned the task of holdore skilful or successful than those by which Magruder accomplished his task. Magruder's line stretMagruder's line stretched across the Peninsula from Yorktown to Mulberry Point on the James. With 6,000 of his men he ga checked, and so vigorously and skilfully did Magruder manage his forces that the Federal army forboeat skill in retiring from Yorktown as he and Magruder had shown in defending it. At the last momentechanicsville bridge as soon as it was open. Magruder and Huger were left to hold the lines in fronng twenty-two guns. While this was going on, Magruder made such a display of force in front of Richhe Chickahominy, which kept him back all day. Magruder finding that the enemy had abandoned the lined the rear, under Sumner, at Savage Station. Magruder's attack was partial, he only using about hal the assaults, especially on the right, where Magruder commanded, were partial and disjointed, and t[7 more...]
Frank Huger (search for this): chapter 4.35
hose to do it. A small Confederate force under Huger still held Norfolk and the Navy Yard, where thades from Gordonsville and Fredericksburg, and Huger's three brigades from Petersburg. General Webhickahominy. Hours were wasted in waiting for Huger to get into position. Finally, about midday, tive. Too much time was wasted in waiting for Huger; but a more serious fault was the delay in sene bridge as soon as it was open. Magruder and Huger were left to hold the lines in front of Richmoth side of the river, in front of Magruder and Huger. Lee had left on the south side some 25,000 tMagruder was directed to make a circuit around Huger and follow Longstreet. Jackson soon reachedsisted by Franklin until night-fall. Meantime Huger was impeded by some felled timber in his way, y big with fate to McClellan. Had Jackson and Huger co-operated with Longstreet in his assault, th the Federal army must have been overwhelmed. Huger, though nearest Longstreet, did nothing, and s[5 more...]
e an advance by way of Fredericksburg as well as be within reach should McClellan choose a more southerly line of approach. Johnston continued to maintain a bold front at Manassas, and by various ruses imposed greatly exaggerated notions of his strength upon McClellan to the last moment. To the latter's great surprise he quietly evacuated Manassas on March 9th. This movement of the Confederate army somewhat deranged McClellan's plans. After long discussion, the latter had induced President Lincoln to agree to his plan of transporting the mass of his army to Urbana, on the lower Rappahannock, for an advance thence by way of West Point on Richmond. A main inducement to this plan was that the Federal army might by a rapid movement interpose itself between Richmond and General Johnston. With the Confederates behind the Rappahannock this last could no longer be hoped for, and General McClellan now had recourse to the alternative plan which he had kept in reserve (General Webb calls
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 4.35
nd D. H. Hill were halted for this purpose. Longstreet accomplished the end in view handsomely by snston did not order Smith forward promptly. Longstreet had been two or three hours engaged before G contest until night, prevented his going to Longstreet's assistance. General Johnston fell severelre but desultory fighting took place between Longstreet's lines and the fresh troops of Hooker's anddelay in sending forward Smith's division on Longstreet's left. Next morning the battle might have to cross there, and he was to be followed by Longstreet and D. H. Hill by way of the Mechanicsville nd issued orders accordingly. On the 29th Longstreet and A. P. Hill were sent to the south side oected to press along the Charles City road. Longstreet, with his own and A. P. Hill's divisions, wa Holmes was quickly and completely checked. Longstreet and A. P. Hill, however, attacked vigorouslylan. Had Jackson and Huger co-operated with Longstreet in his assault, the result can hardly be dou[8 more...]
to press along the Charles City road. Longstreet, with his own and A. P. Hill's divisions, was to attack its flank along the Long-Bridge road. Nearer the James, Holmes was advancing along the River road. Magruder was directed to make a circuit around Huger and follow Longstreet. Jackson soon reached White Oak Swamp and found passage for his infantry were successfully resisted by Franklin until night-fall. Meantime Huger was impeded by some felled timber in his way, and did nothing. Holmes, on the extreme Confederate right, ran against Porter and some Federal artillery that had taken position at Malvern under the fire of the gunboats in James river, and Holmes was quickly and completely checked. Longstreet and A. P. Hill, however, attacked vigorously at Frazier's farm, and defeated and put to flight the greater part of McCall's division, capturing its commander and inflicting severe losses on the troops brought up in support. At night-fall the Confederates had pressed near
Heintzelman (search for this): chapter 4.35
n brigades, and prepared to throw them, on the morrow, against the Federal corps of Keyes and Heintzelman, which were on the south side. A terrific rain storm occurred on the night of the 30th, wh Federal division was quickly routed and the whole of Keyes's Corps and Kearney's division of Heintzelman's was during the afternoon, defeated and driven from their works and camps to a third line ofnd when in the middle of the afternoon Smith was hurried forward to give the coup de grace to Heintzelman, he was just in time to run against the head of Sumner's corps at Fair Oaks. The latter sentte force at hand with good promise of success. As it was, the Confederates had hit Keyes and Heintzelman damaging blows, but it had been done at heavy cost, and the only result of value to them was half his force, and though there was much demoralization in the Federal army as indicated by Heintzelman's precipitate retreat and the destruction of stores, Sumner was able to hold his ground and k
J. E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 4.35
y, and then move an army twice as numerous as Johnston's to the Rappahannock or the lower Chesapeakeossessed many advantages over all the others, Johnston expected his adversary to move by it, and thean choose a more southerly line of approach. Johnston continued to maintain a bold front at Manassask of holding the Federal army in check until Johnston's forces could arrive. We believe that histones were held for one month — long enough for Johnston and the bulk of his army to reach Yorktown — s about ready to open his powerful batteries, Johnston quietly retreated towards Richmond, and so suthe fear of McDowell's forces from the North, Johnston, who had determined to attack McClellan beforre and more from their supports. On May 30th Johnston concentrated twenty-three of his twenty-sevenrks a mile or two in the rear. Unfortunately Johnston did not order Smith forward promptly. Longsted his going to Longstreet's assistance. General Johnston fell severely wounded at night-fall and t[14 more...]<
as to McClellan's designs on the 28th, and such movements as he made that day were made with the notion that McClellan would recross the Chickahominy at Battner's bridge or at some of the crossings below. It was night before the Confederate commander divined McClellan's plans, and issued orders accordingly. On the 29th Longstreet and A. P. Hill were sent to the south side of the Chickahominy. They were, by a circuit, to strike the Long-Bridge road and the flank of the retreating army. McGruder and Huger were to press the rear of the Federals by the Williamsburg and Charles City roads, Jackson to cross the Chickahominy and join in the pursuit. Longstreet was busy all day marching towards his destination. Jackson was compelled to repair the bridge over the Chickahominy, which kept him back all day. Magruder finding that the enemy had abandoned the lines in his front and had left or destroyed great quantities of stores, pressed after him and attacked the rear, under Sumner, at Sav
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