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uch a movement in view, as may be seen from General Lee's letter to him of May 16.) The victories ob thinks it worthy of only a passing allusion. Lee now ordered Jackson to join the main army, usin the approach of his swift-footed assailant. Lee was now ready to deliver battle. His strength,421, and of Colonel Taylor, Four Years with General Lee, the latter of which General Webb adopts, p be achieved it must be done in spite of it. To Lee's mind a simply defensive policy, resulting ults. The information brought by Stuart confirmed Lee in his plan, and Jackson was then ordered to coforce from that side to reinforce Porter. Thus Lee managed to hold two-thirds of McClellan's army versary and gained him a day's breathing time. Lee was uncertain as to McClellan's designs on the of his forces and his immense artillery. Here Lee again attacked, but after a sanguinary contest,l of the enemy to the front of Washington. General Lee was new to his plan and new to the army he [6 more...]
check the advance of the Federals, which was pressing their rear. Longstreet and D. H. Hill were halted for this purpose. Longstreet accomplished the end in view handsomely by severely defeating Hooker's division, and inflicting some damage on Kearney's. D. H. Hill, on the Confederate left, did not manage so well, and in consequence Hancock was able there to inflict a severe repulse on Early's brigade. But, on the whole, General Johnston, with a loss of over 1,500, inflicted a loss of over 2wards the Chickahominy. Hours were wasted in waiting for Huger to get into position. Finally, about midday, Longstreet ordered the attack to be made by D. H. Hill. Casey's Federal division was quickly routed and the whole of Keyes's Corps and Kearney's division of Heintzelman's was during the afternoon, defeated and driven from their works and camps to a third line of works a mile or two in the rear. Unfortunately Johnston did not order Smith forward promptly. Longstreet had been two or th
H. B. Richardson (search for this): chapter 4.35
stening forward arrived soon enough to stop Smith, and by engaging him in a stubborn and bloody contest until night, prevented his going to Longstreet's assistance. General Johnston fell severely wounded at night-fall and the usual result of a change of commanders in the midst of a battle was seen next day. No concerted, definite plan of operations guided the Confederates on June 1st. Severe but desultory fighting took place between Longstreet's lines and the fresh troops of Hooker's and Richardson's divisions without any decided result, while Smith, now in chief command of the Confederates remained quiet in front of Sumner, though Magruder's large division, which had been unengaged, was at hand. By midday all fighting had ceased. Early in the afternoon General R. E. Lee, was placed in command by President Davis, and during the evening and night he ordered the Confederate army back to its late positions in front of Richmond. The battle of Seven Pines, though costing each army ab
lest further delay might imperil the whole movement by revealing it to the enemy, he carried the bridge before him, and, moving down towards Mechanicsville, drove the small Federal force there to the lines at Beaver Dam creek, which were held by McCall's division. Jackson was expected to turn this line, but being yet behind, A. P. Hill engaged the Federal forces and made attempts on each flank, which were, however, repulsed. Longstreet and D. H. Hill joined A. P. Hill near nightfall, and the taken position at Malvern under the fire of the gunboats in James river, and Holmes was quickly and completely checked. Longstreet and A. P. Hill, however, attacked vigorously at Frazier's farm, and defeated and put to flight the greater part of McCall's division, capturing its commander and inflicting severe losses on the troops brought up in support. At night-fall the Confederates had pressed nearly to the Quaker road, on which the Federals were retreating, and had taken many prisoners and t
t exceed 3,000, and Taylor's Four Years with General Lee, page 50, where Anderson's strength is given at from 2,000 to 2,300 in the seven days battles.) Huger's brigades may have numbered 6,000 at this time. Thus the Confederates were able to concentrate about 65,000 men to oppose the 150,000 which were about to unite against them. It would be hard to find a finer illustration of the adage, that fortune favors the brave than occurred at this juncture. Stonewall Jackson, after defeating Fremont's advance in the mountains of West Virginia, and while he was supposed to be one hundred and fifty miles away, suddenly surprised Banks at Front Royal and Winchester, and driving him in confusion and route across the Potomac, advanced to Harper's Ferry. Jackson and his 16,000 men created a marvelous panic at Washington and throughout the North, the accounts of which at this day read like the pages of a romance. The Federal Capitol was believed to be in danger, 300,000 men were called for
Wingfield S. Hancock (search for this): chapter 4.35
nd disconcerted McClellan, that it was half a day before he could begin the pursuit. (Page 69.) At Williamsburg (May 5) the Confederates found it necessary to check the advance of the Federals, which was pressing their rear. Longstreet and D. H. Hill were halted for this purpose. Longstreet accomplished the end in view handsomely by severely defeating Hooker's division, and inflicting some damage on Kearney's. D. H. Hill, on the Confederate left, did not manage so well, and in consequence Hancock was able there to inflict a severe repulse on Early's brigade. But, on the whole, General Johnston, with a loss of over 1,500, inflicted a loss of over 2,200, and effectually checked the pursuit. McClellan sent a large force, headed by Franklin's division by water to the head of the York opposite West Point, with the purpose of there landing and seizing the Confederate line of retreat; but Johnston attacked the first troops that landed vigorously, drove them back to the cover of their gun
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 4.35
art of McDowell's army was ordered back after Jackson, and the remainder was held for the time at Fred from the South were ordered to Richmond. Jackson was directed to be prepared to move to the sat to Jackson himself, as he does on page 122. Jackson had been constantly instructed to keep such aome down on McClellan's right and rear. When Jackson was at hand A. P. Hill was to send a brigade ahominy above the Federal right to unite with Jackson, and when the Confederate forces had moved docreek, which were held by McCall's division. Jackson was expected to turn this line, but being yet. P. Hill near nightfall, and the approach of Jackson on their flank caused the Federals to retreats by the Williamsburg and Charles City roads, Jackson to cross the Chickahominy and join in the purircuit around Huger and follow Longstreet. Jackson soon reached White Oak Swamp and found the paeatest blunders of the Confederate campaign. Jackson was held back by a very serious obstacle, bac[15 more...]
J. R. Anderson (search for this): chapter 4.35
enduring monument of his military audacity and skill. One of the best chapters in General Webb's book is the last. It is clear, temperate and judicious. One of the worst is that on Malvern Hill, which is disjointed and confused. There are numerous smaller oversights, some of which show haste in preparation or careless proof-reading. Thus Whiting is several times called Whitney (pages 82-134), Mechum's River is called Mechanic's Run (page 122), R. H. Anderson is erroneously put for J. R. Anderson (page 96), Ellison's Mill is called Ellicott's Mill. (Page 126.) Confederate brigades are frequently spoken of as divisions--as Gregg's brigade (page 132), Armistead's brigade. (Page 156.) A. P. Hill's report is misquoted, to make the same mistake on page 150, where Field's and Pender's brigades are turned into divisions. I have noted no mistakes of the opposite kind. On page 187, the Confederates attacking Porter are spoken of as 70,000 in number (?), though here General Webb may be
W. D. Pender (search for this): chapter 4.35
skill. One of the best chapters in General Webb's book is the last. It is clear, temperate and judicious. One of the worst is that on Malvern Hill, which is disjointed and confused. There are numerous smaller oversights, some of which show haste in preparation or careless proof-reading. Thus Whiting is several times called Whitney (pages 82-134), Mechum's River is called Mechanic's Run (page 122), R. H. Anderson is erroneously put for J. R. Anderson (page 96), Ellison's Mill is called Ellicott's Mill. (Page 126.) Confederate brigades are frequently spoken of as divisions--as Gregg's brigade (page 132), Armistead's brigade. (Page 156.) A. P. Hill's report is misquoted, to make the same mistake on page 150, where Field's and Pender's brigades are turned into divisions. I have noted no mistakes of the opposite kind. On page 187, the Confederates attacking Porter are spoken of as 70,000 in number (?), though here General Webb may be giving McClellan's estimate and not his own.
Ambrose P. Hill (search for this): chapter 4.35
ellan's right and rear. When Jackson was at hand A. P. Hill was to send a brigade across the Chickahominy aboide and uncovered Meadow bridge, the remainder of A. P. Hill's division was to cross there, and he was to be f was behind time on the morning of June 26th, and A. P. Hill waited from early in the morning until the middleexpected to turn this line, but being yet behind, A. P. Hill engaged the Federal forces and made attempts on eever, repulsed. Longstreet and D. H. Hill joined A. P. Hill near nightfall, and the approach of Jackson on thorders accordingly. On the 29th Longstreet and A. P. Hill were sent to the south side of the Chickahominy. Charles City road. Longstreet, with his own and A. P. Hill's divisions, was to attack its flank along the Los quickly and completely checked. Longstreet and A. P. Hill, however, attacked vigorously at Frazier's farm, gade (page 132), Armistead's brigade. (Page 156.) A. P. Hill's report is misquoted, to make the same mistake o
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