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r his death Beverly W. Robertson was appointed Brigadier-General and assigned to the command. He arrived just as we left the valley. I forgot to mention that Captain Hammond's Company of the Cavalry had been acting as couriers for General Ewell till just before we left the Rappahannock; but Captain Elijah V. White's (Loudoun Rangers) was then substituted and has been acting ever since, besides doing a great deal of scouting duty. At the battle of Gaines's Mill or Cold Harbor, on Friday, June 27th, Colonel Isaac G. Seymour Sixth Louisiana (then in command of the brigade, General Taylor having been sick since Port Republic) was killed, so was Major C. R. Wheat First Special (Tiger) battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel D. B. Penn, Seventh Louisiana slightly wounded. General Elzey was at first thought to be mortally wounded; but is recovering. Major Hooper, Twenty-first Georgia, was severely wounded. Major Nelson was here slightly wounded. The day before the fight at Malvern Hill Gen
Notes on Ewell's division in the campaign of 1862. By Col. Campbell Brown, of Ewell's Staff. [Written at the time.] Memorandum.September 8TH, 1862. While on the Rappahannock, in March and April, 1862, our division consisted of Taylor's (eighth brigade), Trimble's (seventh brigade), Elzey's (fourth brigade). These officers ranked — Elzey, Trimble, Taylor. The numbers of the brigades were those they had in the army of the Potomac while at Centreville. Our division was there known as tto Captain for conduct here), wounded. Just after Fredericksburg General J. B. Gordon was promoted to command of Lawton's brigade, and Early made Major-General. Note, May 4th, 1874.--This is a copy of a memorandum made by me during the fall of 1862 and spring of 1863. The date shows when it was begun — the mention of Fredericksburg that it was finished some time afterwards. I don't know whether these notes are fit to publish, and only contribute it as a small addition to the history of Ewe
February, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 5.46
own, of Ewell's Staff. [Written at the time.] Memorandum.September 8TH, 1862. While on the Rappahannock, in March and April, 1862, our division consisted of Taylor's (eighth brigade), Trimble's (seventh brigade), Elzey's (fourth brigade). These officers ranked — Elzey, Trimble, Taylor. The numbers of the brigades were those they had in the army of the Potomac while at Centreville. Our division was there known as the Third, or Reserve division, and commanded until the middle of February, 1862, by Kirby Smith. The brigades were composed as follows: Fourth Brigade.--Tenth Virginia regiment, Colonel Gibbons; Thirteenth Virginia regiment, Colonel James A. Walker; First Maryland regiment, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson. Seventh Brigade.--Fifteenth Alabama regiment, Colonel Jas. Cantey; Sixteenth Mississippi regiment, Colonel Carnot Posey; Twenty-first Georgia regiment, Colonel J. F. Mercer; Twenty-first North Carolina regiment, Colonel W. W. Kirkland. Eighth Brigade.--Sixth Loui
March, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 5.46
Notes on Ewell's division in the campaign of 1862. By Col. Campbell Brown, of Ewell's Staff. [Written at the time.] Memorandum.September 8TH, 1862. While on the Rappahannock, in March and April, 1862, our division consisted of Taylor's (eighth brigade), Trimble's (seventh brigade), Elzey's (fourth brigade). These officers ranked — Elzey, Trimble, Taylor. The numbers of the brigades were those they had in the army of the Potomac while at Centreville. Our division was there known as the Third, or Reserve division, and commanded until the middle of February, 1862, by Kirby Smith. The brigades were composed as follows: Fourth Brigade.--Tenth Virginia regiment, Colonel Gibbons; Thirteenth Virginia regiment, Colonel James A. Walker; First Maryland regiment, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson. Seventh Brigade.--Fifteenth Alabama regiment, Colonel Jas. Cantey; Sixteenth Mississippi regiment, Colonel Carnot Posey; Twenty-first Georgia regiment, Colonel J. F. Mercer; Twenty-first Nort
April, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 5.46
Notes on Ewell's division in the campaign of 1862. By Col. Campbell Brown, of Ewell's Staff. [Written at the time.] Memorandum.September 8TH, 1862. While on the Rappahannock, in March and April, 1862, our division consisted of Taylor's (eighth brigade), Trimble's (seventh brigade), Elzey's (fourth brigade). These officers ranked — Elzey, Trimble, Taylor. The numbers of the brigades were those they had in the army of the Potomac while at Centreville. Our division was there known as the Third, or Reserve division, and commanded until the middle of February, 1862, by Kirby Smith. The brigades were composed as follows: Fourth Brigade.--Tenth Virginia regiment, Colonel Gibbons; Thirteenth Virginia regiment, Colonel James A. Walker; First Maryland regiment, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson. Seventh Brigade.--Fifteenth Alabama regiment, Colonel Jas. Cantey; Sixteenth Mississippi regiment, Colonel Carnot Posey; Twenty-first Georgia regiment, Colonel J. F. Mercer; Twenty-first Nort
June 8th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 5.46
and came to their help. The fight lasted only half an hour. Our loss was seventy-five, that of the enemy nearer one hundred and fifty. Ashby was killed ten steps in front of the line of the Fifty-eighth Virginia trying to induce them to charge. His horse was killed under him, and he had scarcely disengaged himself and started forward when he, too, was killed, shot directly through the body — some insisted from behind, but I think not, from what I could learn. At Cross Keys, on Sunday, June 8th, 1862, only Elzey's, Trimble's, and Stuart's brigades were engaged. General Jackson, before leaving for Port Republic in the morning, had ordered General Ewell to send his best brigade to report at the bridge there to him. The Louisiana brigade was the largest, and accordingly it was the one sent. It was sent back by General Jackson after reaching the bridge and got upon the field in time to be under an artillery fire, but not to aid in the result of the day. Here General Elzey and Gener
September 8th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 5.46
Notes on Ewell's division in the campaign of 1862. By Col. Campbell Brown, of Ewell's Staff. [Written at the time.] Memorandum.September 8TH, 1862. While on the Rappahannock, in March and April, 1862, our division consisted of Taylor's (eighth brigade), Trimble's (seventh brigade), Elzey's (fourth brigade). These officers ranked — Elzey, Trimble, Taylor. The numbers of the brigades were those they had in the army of the Potomac while at Centreville. Our division was there known as the Third, or Reserve division, and commanded until the middle of February, 1862, by Kirby Smith. The brigades were composed as follows: Fourth Brigade.--Tenth Virginia regiment, Colonel Gibbons; Thirteenth Virginia regiment, Colonel James A. Walker; First Maryland regiment, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson. Seventh Brigade.--Fifteenth Alabama regiment, Colonel Jas. Cantey; Sixteenth Mississippi regiment, Colonel Carnot Posey; Twenty-first Georgia regiment, Colonel J. F. Mercer; Twenty-first Nort
ed by the Secretary of War to be disbanded, the men being drafted into the other regiments of the brigade. This was done while on the Rapidan, near Raccoon Ford, after the battle of Cedar Run, but before those of Manassas. At Sharpsburg Colonel Strong, Sixth Louisiana, was killed; General Lawton was wounded. Other officers I don't recollect, except Lieutenant H. B. Richardson, Engineer of General Ewell's staff (promoted to Captain for conduct here), wounded. Just after Fredericksburg General J. B. Gordon was promoted to command of Lawton's brigade, and Early made Major-General. Note, May 4th, 1874.--This is a copy of a memorandum made by me during the fall of 1862 and spring of 1863. The date shows when it was begun — the mention of Fredericksburg that it was finished some time afterwards. I don't know whether these notes are fit to publish, and only contribute it as a small addition to the history of Ewell's division, to be used as the discretion of the Society may dictate.
May 4th, 1874 AD (search for this): chapter 5.46
d by the Secretary of War to be disbanded, the men being drafted into the other regiments of the brigade. This was done while on the Rapidan, near Raccoon Ford, after the battle of Cedar Run, but before those of Manassas. At Sharpsburg Colonel Strong, Sixth Louisiana, was killed; General Lawton was wounded. Other officers I don't recollect, except Lieutenant H. B. Richardson, Engineer of General Ewell's staff (promoted to Captain for conduct here), wounded. Just after Fredericksburg General J. B. Gordon was promoted to command of Lawton's brigade, and Early made Major-General. Note, May 4th, 1874.--This is a copy of a memorandum made by me during the fall of 1862 and spring of 1863. The date shows when it was begun — the mention of Fredericksburg that it was finished some time afterwards. I don't know whether these notes are fit to publish, and only contribute it as a small addition to the history of Ewell's division, to be used as the discretion of the Society may dictate.
undred men) got engaged with the Pennsylvania Buck-Tail Rifles, and had their hands full till the First Maryland came to their help. The fight lasted only half an hour. Our loss was seventy-five, that of the enemy nearer one hundred and fifty. Ashby was killed ten steps in front of the line of the Fifty-eighth Virginia trying to induce them to charge. His horse was killed under him, and he had scarcely disengaged himself and started forward when he, too, was killed, shot directly through thnd Captain Brown's (formerly Captain Gaither's Company, and in the First Virginia Cavalry) Company of Maryland Cavalry was left under command of Colonel Bradley T. Johnson. While in the valley all the cavalry had been placed under command of General Ashby--after his death Beverly W. Robertson was appointed Brigadier-General and assigned to the command. He arrived just as we left the valley. I forgot to mention that Captain Hammond's Company of the Cavalry had been acting as couriers for Ge
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