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iked and another had a shell lodged in its bore from one of our guns, which broke a trunion plate, partially dismounting her. There were fifteen of her crew killed and wounded, the Captain among the killed. The Venus was intact as to machinery and hull, although, out of a detachment of infantry she had on board, ten had been killed and wounded and ten were made prisoners. The barges were emptied of their stores and destroyed. General Forrest arriving upon the ground on the morning of the 31st, energetically pushed the preparations for the contemplated attack on the depot at Johnsonville. General Forrest, sending for me, ordered that I should have the gunboat overhauled, armament repaired, and take charge of the fleet. I readily assented to putting the armament in condition, but begged to be excused from commanding the fleet. I told the General that I could trust to the handling of my guns on land, but was not familiar with naval affairs. After some consultation, remembering ha
f the Paris Landing battery, while repairing damages in the hull and machinery, which could be distinctly heard by Bell's sharp-shooters. It was subsequently ascertained that the white flag was raised by the wife of the Captain of the gunboat, who had been killed, and was snatched down by the second officer in command. The men at Zarring's guns, having a commanding position, fought continuously for over an hour, and advanced their pieces by hand for nearly a mile; although on a chilly October day, with the sun obscured by hanging clouds, the men becoming exhausted from hard physical effort, would for a moment drop from their posts and crawl to the river's edge to bathe their burning brows and quench their thirst with the muddy water of the turbid stream. This was certainly a remarkable contest, when we consider the consternation and panic usually produced amongst troops upon the appearance of Federal gunboats, and especially to those unaccustomed to gunboat warfare. Lieutenant
Raid of Forrest's cavalry on the Tennessee river in 1864. By Captain John W. Morton, Chief of Artillery in Forrest's Cavalry Corps [Read before the Louisville Branch of the Southern Historical Society.] Two batteries of the battalion of artillery, Forrest's Cavalry Corps, which I had the honor to command, namely, Walton's and Morton's, the former composed of two ten-pounder and two twenty-pounder Parrott guns which had been captured from the enemy by Forrest's cavalry, and the latter composed of four three-inch steel-rifled Rodman guns, which had also been captured by our command, reached the the mouth of the Sandy on the evening of October 28, 1864, accompanied by Buford's division of cavalry. This raid was evidently intended to delay the concentration of troops and stores by the Federals at Nashville, and to assist General Hood in his advance into Middle Tennessee. After a careful reconnoissance by General Buford of the river front for several miles above and also below t
October 28th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 5.47
sville Branch of the Southern Historical Society.] Two batteries of the battalion of artillery, Forrest's Cavalry Corps, which I had the honor to command, namely, Walton's and Morton's, the former composed of two ten-pounder and two twenty-pounder Parrott guns which had been captured from the enemy by Forrest's cavalry, and the latter composed of four three-inch steel-rifled Rodman guns, which had also been captured by our command, reached the the mouth of the Sandy on the evening of October 28, 1864, accompanied by Buford's division of cavalry. This raid was evidently intended to delay the concentration of troops and stores by the Federals at Nashville, and to assist General Hood in his advance into Middle Tennessee. After a careful reconnoissance by General Buford of the river front for several miles above and also below the mouth of Sandy, we selected the old Confederate Fort Heiman and Paris Landing and the mouth of Sandy, the former place some five miles distant by river fr
Tyree H. Bell (search for this): chapter 5.47
rozier commanding, was ordered into position about 1,000 yards above Paris Landing, near the mouth of Sandy. The guns at these positions were supported by General Tyree H. Bell's brigade of cavalry, dismounted and deployed as skirmishers. The entire command received strict orders not to disturb any transport, gunboat, or passine hands of a lady was seen waving through a port-hole. Our firing ceased for an instant, when the flag was snatched down. The firing was immediately resumed, and Bell's sharp-shooters, at once brought into requisition, fired incessantly, with vigorous effect. The Confederates proving too formidable, the Undine dropped down behi from which position she began a noisy shelling of the Paris Landing battery, while repairing damages in the hull and machinery, which could be distinctly heard by Bell's sharp-shooters. It was subsequently ascertained that the white flag was raised by the wife of the Captain of the gunboat, who had been killed, and was snatche
e glided smoothly into port amid the cheers and rejoicings of the Ragged Rebs, who had an eye more to the shoes, blankets, clothing, hard-tack, and other good things with which she was heavily freighted, than to the glory of the capture. Approaching the landing, an amusing incident occurred, illustrative of the former characteristics of the gallant General (we believe he has since become a consistent member of the Christian church). Having discovered a two-gallon jug of choice old Kentucky Bourbon, he claimed this as his treasure trove, and was striding the deck, holding the jug to his mouth with a devotion peculiar to his impulsive nature, when some of the men cried out: Hold on, General, save some of the whiskey for us. He replied with a full ore rotundo: Plenty of shoes and blankets for the boys, but just whiskey enough for the General. The greater part of the stores were safely discharged upon the bank by 5 P. M. About this time three Federal gunboats approached from below, a
W. H. Briggs (search for this): chapter 5.47
almers arriving about this time, with Rucker's brigade and a section of Rice's battery, Lieutenant W. H. Briggs commanding, the General took charge of the Chessman, and in company with him and staff C. Kelley's and Colonel T. H. Logwood's Tennessee cavalry regiments, and make a speedy attack. Briggs's section of James's Rifles (which had been captured at Eastport from the enemy by Colonel D. C. gunboat, coming down stream at the sound of the conflict, cast anchor one mile and a half above Briggs's section and opened a brisk shelling. Briggs's pieces being too far from the gunboat for execuBriggs's pieces being too far from the gunboat for execution were moved, by order of General Chalmers, to shorter range, supported by Chalmers's escort and a company of Alabama cadets as sharp-shooters. Selecting a suitable position, Briggs and the supporBriggs and the supports, after a spirited engagement, forced the gunboat to weigh anchor and withdraw up the river. The Undine, one of the largest of its class of gunboats, was a good deal shattered, a shot having pass
J. W. Brown (search for this): chapter 5.47
Sale's section (Sale had been left sick in Mississippi)--Morton's battery — in charge of Lieutenant J. W. Brown, was placed on the river bank some 800 yards below Hunter's position, both sections beinppa, with a barge in tow, both heavily laden, unaware of the lurking danger, was allowed to pass Brown's three-inch Rodmans, and when well above us I ordered Brown to run his guns from under cover upBrown to run his guns from under cover up close to the water's edge and open upon her. This was promptly followed by Walton's heavy Parrotts, and with such effect that her machinery was speedily disabled, and she drifted helplessly to the obatteries and fall into the snare. As she approached Fort Heiman a few well-directed shots from Brown's Rodmans and from Walton's 6-inch Parrotts caused her to raise the white flag. General Buford,as he approached the bank, cried out, I will round to at the lower landing. This was just under Brown's section. General Buford and myself repaired to that landing. When approaching she hugged the
he evening of October 28, 1864, accompanied by Buford's division of cavalry. This raid was evidentlssee. After a careful reconnoissance by General Buford of the river front for several miles aboveosite bank, and was deserted by her crew. General Buford's trouble and anxiety to secure this valuaady to draw the steamer across the river. General Buford, myself, and several others, taking possesthe flag-staff, and under command of Commodore Buford, who strode the upper deck with the pride and visions with such vigor and precision that General Buford deemed it expedient to at once remove the , requiring the entire transportation force of Buford's division, added to that of all the wagons throtts caused her to raise the white flag. General Buford, anxious to capture her uninjured if possing. This was just under Brown's section. General Buford and myself repaired to that landing. Whenle. Meanwhile, I received an order from General Buford to move one section of artillery from Pari
antly in motion and the guns changing position at every discharge, hardly a shot failed to strike its mark. She was irreparably injured and drifted ashore. General Chalmers arriving about this time, with Rucker's brigade and a section of Rice's battery, Lieutenant W. H. Briggs commanding, the General took charge of the Chessman,one mile and a half above Briggs's section and opened a brisk shelling. Briggs's pieces being too far from the gunboat for execution were moved, by order of General Chalmers, to shorter range, supported by Chalmers's escort and a company of Alabama cadets as sharp-shooters. Selecting a suitable position, Briggs and the supports,Chalmers's escort and a company of Alabama cadets as sharp-shooters. Selecting a suitable position, Briggs and the supports, after a spirited engagement, forced the gunboat to weigh anchor and withdraw up the river. The Undine, one of the largest of its class of gunboats, was a good deal shattered, a shot having passed through from stem to stern, but was not seriously injured in hull, machinery or armament. One gun had been spiked and another had a
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