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Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.55
erryville to Winchester. Crossing the Potomac and march to Carlisle. I sent notice to General Rodes of Milroy's escape, but he was not in a position to intercept him, Jenkins's cavalry being already (10 A. M., 15th June) on the Potomac near Williamsport. General Rodes crossed at Williamsport with three brigades, sending Jenkins forward to Chambersburg, and on the 19th his division moved by my orders to Hagerstown, where he encamped on the road to Boonsboroa, while Johnson crossed to Sharpsburg, and Early moved to Shepherdstown to threaten Harper's Ferry. In these positions we waited for the other two corps to close up until the 21st of June, on the afternoon of which day I received orders from the General commanding to take Harrisburg, and next morning Rodes and Johnson moved towards Greencastle, Pa.; Jenkins reoccupied Chambersburg, from which he had fallen back some days before, and Early marched by Boonsboroa to Cavetown, where the Seventeenth Virginia cavalry (Colonel Fre
Jordan's Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.55
ered General Johnson with the Stonewall, Nicholls', and three regiments of Steuart's brigade and Dement's battery, with sections of Rains's and Carpenter's (the whole under Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews) to proceed to a point on the Martinsburg road, about two and one-half miles east of Winchester, so as to intercept any attempt to escape, or to be ready to attack at daylight if the enemy held their ground. Finding the road to this point very rough, General Johnson concluded to march via Jordan's Springs to Stephenson's Depot, where the nature of the ground would give him a strong position. Just as the head of his column reached the railroad, two hundred yards from the Martinsburg pike, the enemy was heard retreating down the pike towards Martinsburg. Forming line parallel with the pike, behind a stone wall, Steuart on the right and the Louisiana brigade on the left, twelve hundred men in all, and posting the artillery favorably, he was immediately attacked by Milroy with all his forc
Shippensburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.55
the 27th, halting one day at Chambersburg to secure supplies. The marching was as rapid as the weather and the detours made by Major-General Early and Brigadier-General George H. Steuart would admit. Early, having marched parallel with us as far as Greenwood, there turned off towards Gettysburg and York. At Carlisle General George H. Steuart, who had been detached to McConnellsburg from Greencastle, rejoined the corps, bringing some cattle and horses. At Carlisle, Chambersburg, and Shippensburg requisitions were made for supplies and the shops were searched, many valuable stores being secured. At Chambersburg a train was loaded with ordnance and medical stores and sent back. Near 3,000 head of cattle were collected and sent back by my corps; and my chief commissary, Major Hawks, notified Colonel Cole of the location of 5,000 barrels of flour along the route travelled by my command. From Carlisle I sent forward my engineer, Captain Richardson, with General Jenkins's cavalry
William Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.55
nge of the enemy on the 15th June, and maintained its position till thirteen of the sixteen men in the two detachments were killed or wounded, when Lieutenant John A. Morgan, of the First North Carolina regiment, and Lieutenant R. H. McKim, A. D. C. to Brigadier-General George H. Steuart, volunteered and helped to work the guns till the surrender of the enemy. The following are the names of the gallant men belonging to the section: Lieutenant C. S. Contee, A. J. Albert, Jr., John Kester, William Hill, B. W. Owens, John Glascock, John Harris, William Wooden, C. C. Pease, Frederick Frayer,----Duvall, William Compton, John Yates, William Brown, Wm. H. Gorman, Thomas Moor, Robert B. Chew. Colonel Brown, Chief of Artillery, recommends Lieutenant Contee for promotion to the captaincy of the Chesapeake artillery, vice Captain W. D. Brown, a most gallant and valuable officer, killed at Gettysburg. At Gettysburg. Captain D. P. Halsey, A. A. G. of Iverson's brigade, displayed conspicuous
York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.55
manding to join the main army at Cashtown, near Gettysburg. Agreeably to the views of the General commanding, I did not burn Carlisle barracks. Expedition to York and Wrightsville. Colonel E. V. White's cavalry battalion reported to me at Chambersburg, and was sent to General Early, then at Greenwood. Arriving at Cashtowiment Pennsylvania militia, of whom 175 were taken and paroled. From Gettysburg, Gordon, with Tanner's battery and White's cavalry, was sent on the direct road to York. General Gordon met the Mayor and a deputation of citizens, who made a formal surrender of the place. Pushing on by order of General Early to Wrightsville on theeded in extinguishing the flames. Yet he is accused by the Federal press of having set fire to the town. General Early levied a contribution on the citizens of York, obtaining among other things $28,600 in United States currency (the greater part of which was turned over to Colonel Corley, Chief Q. M. Army of Northern Virginia
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.55
d secure in that respect, trusting to his experience, judgment and coolness. Captain H. D. Richardson, Chief Engineer, was severely wounded at Gettysburg, and left, I regret to say, in the enemy's hands — a loss I have very severely felt ever since that engagement. The efficiency and value of Major Allan and Captain Wilbourn in their respective departments are well known. The reports of the division commanders accompany this report; also those of the brigade commanders and the chief of artillery. To these I beg leave to refer for greater detail in their respective operations than is practicable in the report of the corps commander. I have the pleasure to send you the accompanying maps of the campaign by Captain Jed. Hotchkiss, Topographical Engineer, being the map of routes to and from Gettysburg, map of the battlefield of Winchester, and map of the battlefield of Gettysburg. Respectfully, &c., (Signed) R. S. Ewell, Lieu't-Gen'l C. S. A. Comd'g Second Corps A. V. Va.
Greencastle (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.55
rry. In these positions we waited for the other two corps to close up until the 21st of June, on the afternoon of which day I received orders from the General commanding to take Harrisburg, and next morning Rodes and Johnson moved towards Greencastle, Pa.; Jenkins reoccupied Chambersburg, from which he had fallen back some days before, and Early marched by Boonsboroa to Cavetown, where the Seventeenth Virginia cavalry (Colonel French) reported to him and remained with him till the battle of Gnd Brigadier-General George H. Steuart would admit. Early, having marched parallel with us as far as Greenwood, there turned off towards Gettysburg and York. At Carlisle General George H. Steuart, who had been detached to McConnellsburg from Greencastle, rejoined the corps, bringing some cattle and horses. At Carlisle, Chambersburg, and Shippensburg requisitions were made for supplies and the shops were searched, many valuable stores being secured. At Chambersburg a train was loaded with or
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.55
tillery in position, drove off the opposing battery, which retreated towards Williamsport, so closely pursued by Jenkins's dismounted cavalry and two squadrons mountem, Jenkins's cavalry being already (10 A. M., 15th June) on the Potomac near Williamsport. General Rodes crossed at Williamsport with three brigades, sending JenkinsWilliamsport with three brigades, sending Jenkins forward to Chambersburg, and on the 19th his division moved by my orders to Hagerstown, where he encamped on the road to Boonsboroa, while Johnson crossed to Sharpsbe 7th of July. On the 11th we were moved into line between Hagerstown and Williamsport, our right joining the left of the Third Corps, and began fortifying; and inhe night of the 14th I was ordered with my infantry and artillery to ford at Williamsport, the ammunition chests going in the ferry-boat. I could find no ferry-boat to aid General Imboden in repelling the enemy's attack on the wagon-train at Williamsport. Iverson's brigade, sent back to guard my wagon-train from Fairfield, had
McConnellsburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.55
reported to him and remained with him till the battle of Gettysburg. Continuing our march, we reached Carlisle on the 27th, halting one day at Chambersburg to secure supplies. The marching was as rapid as the weather and the detours made by Major-General Early and Brigadier-General George H. Steuart would admit. Early, having marched parallel with us as far as Greenwood, there turned off towards Gettysburg and York. At Carlisle General George H. Steuart, who had been detached to McConnellsburg from Greencastle, rejoined the corps, bringing some cattle and horses. At Carlisle, Chambersburg, and Shippensburg requisitions were made for supplies and the shops were searched, many valuable stores being secured. At Chambersburg a train was loaded with ordnance and medical stores and sent back. Near 3,000 head of cattle were collected and sent back by my corps; and my chief commissary, Major Hawks, notified Colonel Cole of the location of 5,000 barrels of flour along the route trav
Bower's Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.55
oming within reach of the enemy's fortifications, halted for the night. Before morning the enemy withdrew all their artillery into their fortifications from Bower's Hill and the south and east sides of the town. On examining the enemy's fortifications from General Johnston's position, I found they had put up works on the hills I had intended gaining possession of, and were busy strengthening them. Having reconnoitered with General Early from Bower's Hill, I coincided with his views as to the best point of attack, and directed him to move his main force to the left and carry by assault a small open work on a commanding hill near the Pughtown road, whally engross their attention. General Gordon's brigade and Lieutenant-Colonel Herbet's Maryland battalion, with two batteries, were left by General Early at Bower's Hill, and pushed their skirmishers into Winchester — who were recalled for fear of drawing the enemy's fire on the town. By 4 P. M. General Early had attained, u
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