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John Forsyth (search for this): chapter 3.35
in, added fresh material; and hatred and hostility toward our new Government were manifested in almost every conceivable manner. Another of the commissioners (Forsyth) having arrived in Washington on March 12—eight days after the inauguration of Lincoln—the two commissioners then present, Forsyth and Crawford, addressed to SewaForsyth and Crawford, addressed to Seward, Secretary of State, a note informing him of their presence, stating the friendly and peaceful purposes of their mission, and requesting the appointment of a day, as early as possible, for the presentation to the President of the United States of their credentials and the objects which they had in view. This letter will be founy declares the main object of the expedition to be the relief of Sumter, and that a force will be landed which will overcome all opposition. Roman, Crawford, and Forsyth. The annexed extracts from my message to the Confederate Congress at the opening of its special session on April 29, will serve as a recapitulation of the eve
Robert Anderson (search for this): chapter 3.35
Charleston and Pensacola. Fort Sumter was still occupied by the garrison under command of Major Anderson, with no material change in the circumstances since the failure of the attempt made in Janua forces at Charleston, inquiring whether the fort had been evacuated, or any action taken by Major Anderson indicating the probability of an evacuation. Answer was made to this dispatch that the fort had not been evacuated, that there were no indications of such a purpose, but that Major Anderson was still working on its defenses. This dispatch was taken to Seward by Judge Campbell. Two interviend reenforcements to the garrison. He did not, he says, communicate his plan or purposes to Major Anderson, the commanding officer of the garrison, having discernment enough, perhaps, to divine that d that no war-vessel could be allowed to enter the harbor on any terms. He said he believed Major Anderson preferred an ordinary steamer, and I agreed that the garrison might thus be removed. He sai
W. A. Harris (search for this): chapter 3.35
fore Mr. Seward's assurance of faith fully kept. I am directed by the President of the United States to notify you to expect an attempt will be made to supply Fort Sumter with provisions only; and that, if such an attempt be not resisted, no effort to throw in men, arms, or ammunition, will be made, without further notice, or in case of an attack upon the fort. For this and other documents quoted relative to the transactions of the period, see The Record of Fort Sumter, compiled by W. A. Harris, Columbia, South Carolina, 1862. Thus disappeared the last vestige of the plighted faith and pacific pledges of the Federal government. In order fully to appreciate the significance of this communication, and of the time and circumstances of its delivery, it must be borne in mind that the naval expedition which had been secretly in preparation for some time at New York, under direction of Captain Fox, was now ready to sail, and might reasonably be expected to be at Charleston almos
Martin J. Crawford (search for this): chapter 3.35
The commission to Washington city arrival of Crawford Buchanan's alarm note of the commissioners ost in carrying this purpose into execution. Crawford—first of the commissioners—left Montgomery ontries by friendly ties, I have appointed Martin J. Crawford, one of our most esteemed and trustwortht might be made through such a commission. Crawford—now a judge of the Supreme Court of Georgia, up his lodgings. At this point, continues Judge Crawford, the crowd swelled to astonishing numbers bing his reception in the federal capital, Judge Crawford says: The feverish and emotional condie two commissioners then present, Forsyth and Crawford, addressed to Seward, Secretary of State, a n In the course of this conversation I told Judge Crawford that it was fair to tell him that the opin. I repeated this assurance in writing to Judge Crawford, and informed Governor Seward in writing wcy prevails in the Cabinet at this time. M. J. Crawford. On the same day the announcement mad[2 more...
s alarm note of the commissioners to the New Administration mediation of justices Nelson and Campbell the difficulty about forts Sumter and Pickens Secretary Sewugh the agency of two judges of the Supreme Court of the United States—Justices Nelson of New York and Campbell of Alabama. On March 15, according to the statement othern historical Society, appended to Southern Magazine for February, 1874. Justice Nelson visited the Secretaries of State and of the Treasury and the Attorney Generd excitement in the Northern States, prejudicial to a peaceful adjustment. Justice Nelson suggested that I might be of service. The result of the interview betweempbell to Colonel Munford, as above. This written statement was exhibited to Judge Nelson, before its delivery, and approved by him. The fact that the pledge had been Judge Campbell. Two interviews occurred in relation to it, at both of which Judge Nelson was also present. Of the result of these interviews, Judge Campbell states:
M. J. Crawford (search for this): chapter 3.35
hese words: Washington, April 10, 1861. General G. T. Beauregard: The Tribune of to-day declares the main object of the expedition to be the relief of Sumter, and that a force will be landed which will overcome all opposition. Roman, Crawford, and Forsyth. The annexed extracts from my message to the Confederate Congress at the opening of its special session on April 29, will serve as a recapitulation of the events above narrated, with all of comment that it was then, or is now, c the conviction that the Government of the United States was determined to attempt the conquest of this people, and that our cherished hopes of peace were unobtainable. On the arrival of our Commissioners in Washington on the 5th of March, Crawford, as we have seen, had arrived some days earlier. The statement in the message refers to the arrival of the full commission, or a majority of it. they postponed, at the suggestion of a friendly intermediator, doing more than giving informal noti
ent at Washington Fox's visit to Charleston-secret preparations for coercive measures visit of Lamon renewed assurances of good faith notification to Governor Pickens developments of secret hister [says Governor Pickens, in the message already quoted above], another confidential agent, Colonel Lamon, was sent by the President [Mr. Lincoln], who informed me that he had come to try and arrang Fox was making active, though secret, preparations for his relief expedition. Colonel, or Major Lamon, as he is variously styled in the correspondence, did not return to Charleston, as promised. ernor Pickens was received by the commissioners in Washington, making inquiry with regard to Colonel Lamon, and the meaning of the protracted delay to fulfill the promise of evacuation. This was fifident was concerned about the contents of the telegram—there was a point of honor involved; that Lamon had no agency from him, nor title to speak. Letter to Colonel Munford, above cited. This late
William H. Seward (search for this): chapter 3.35
ifficulty about forts Sumter and Pickens Secretary Seward's assurances duplicity of the Governmentseven days after it was written. The paper of Seward, in reply, without signature or address, datedhington. The letter of the commissioners to Seward was written, as we have seen, on March 12. Th and of the Treasury and the Attorney General (Seward, Chase, and Bates), to dissuade them from unden writing to Judge Crawford, and informed Governor Seward in writing what I had said. Letter to Thus we see that at the very moment when Secretary Seward was renewing to the Confederate governmenovernor Pickens was taken by Judge Campbell to Seward, who appointed the ensuing Monday (April 1) foer of general rumor, a letter was addressed to Seward upon the subject by Judge Campbell, in behalf sing between the Confederate commissioners and Seward, through the distinguished member of the Supren expedition to forward supplies. Lincoln and Seward, New York, 1874, pp. 57, 58. The italics are n[21 more...]
George W. Munford (search for this): chapter 3.35
o the statement of Judge Campbell, See letter of Judge Campbell to Colonel George W. Munford in Papers of the Southern historical Society, appended to Southern Mawas willing to take all the risks of sunshine.—Letter of Judge Campbell to Colonel Munford, as above. This written statement was exhibited to Judge Nelson, before itord, and informed Governor Seward in writing what I had said. Letter to Colonel Munford, above quoted. The italics are not in the original. It would be increolved; that Lamon had no agency from him, nor title to speak. Letter to Colonel Munford, above cited. This late suggestion of the point of honor would seem, undereen a change in his former communications. His answer was, None. Letter to Munford. About the close of the same week (the first in April), the patience of thitten a few days after the transaction, gives this date. In his letter to Colonel Munford, written more than twelve years afterward, he says Sunday, April 8th. The
of March, and, passing through Richmond and Wilmington, reached Charleston on the 21st. Thus we see that at the very moment when Secretary Seward was renewing to the Confederate government, through Judge Campbell, his positive assurance that the evacuation would take place, this emissary was on his way to Charleston to obtain information and devise measures by means of which this promise might be broken. On his arrival in Charleston, Fox tells us that he sought an interview with Captain Hartstein of the Confederate Navy, and through this officer obtained from Governor Pickens permission to visit Fort Sumter. He fails, in his narrative, to state what we learn from Governor Pickens himself, Message to the legislature of South Carolina, November, 1861. that this permission was obtained expressly upon the pledge of pacific purposes. Notwithstanding this pledge, he employed the opportunity afforded by his visit to mature the details of his plan for furnishing supplies and reen
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