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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. Search the whole document.

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Wheatland (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
ngress was still, of course, in session; Senators and members of the House of Representatives, excepting those of the Confederate States, who had withdrawn, were in their seats, and the manifestations of anxious care and gloomy forebodings were plainly to be seen on all sides. This was not confined to sections, but existed among the men of the North and West as well as those of the South. . . . Mr. Buchanan, the President, was in a state of most thorough alarm, not only for his home at Wheatland, but for his personal safety. This statement is in accord with a remark which Buchanan made to the author at an earlier period of the same session, with regard to the violence of Northern sentiment then lately indicated, that he thought it not impossible that his homeward route would be lighted by burning effigies of himself, and that on reaching his home he would find it a heap of ashes. In the very few days which had elapsed between the time of his promise to receive a Commissioner fr
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
surance of faith fully kept. I am directed by the President of the United States to notify you to expect an attempt will be made to supply Fort Sumter with provisions only; and that, if such an attempt be not resisted, no effort to throw in men, arms, or ammunition, will be made, without further notice, or in case of an attack upon the fort. For this and other documents quoted relative to the transactions of the period, see The Record of Fort Sumter, compiled by W. A. Harris, Columbia, South Carolina, 1862. Thus disappeared the last vestige of the plighted faith and pacific pledges of the Federal government. In order fully to appreciate the significance of this communication, and of the time and circumstances of its delivery, it must be borne in mind that the naval expedition which had been secretly in preparation for some time at New York, under direction of Captain Fox, was now ready to sail, and might reasonably be expected to be at Charleston almost immediately after
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
the states and the public debt, has already been mentioned. No time was lost in carrying this purpose into execution. Crawford—first of the commissioners—left Montgomery on or about February 27, and arrived in Washington two or three days before the expiration of Buchanan's term of office as President of the United States. Besihis agency these may be accomplished, I avail myself of this occasion to offer to you the assurance of my distinguished consideration. (Signed) Jefferson Davis. Montgomery, February 17, 1861. It may here be mentioned, in explanation of my desire that the commission, or at least a part of it, should reach Washington before the in great part the author of the whole transaction. It will be observed that not only the commissioners in Washington, but also the Confederate government at Montgomery, were thus assured on the highest authority—that of the Secretary of State of the United States, the official organ of communication of the views and purposes o<
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
senger to Charleston to give notice of its purpose to use force, if opposed in its intention of supplying Fort Sumter. No more striking proof of the absence of good faith in the conduct of the Government of the United States toward the Confederacy can be required, than is contained in the circumstances which accompanied this notice. According to the usual course of navigation, the vessels composing the expedition, and designed for the relief of Fort Sumter, might be looked for in Charleston Harbor on the 9th of April. Yet our Commissioners in Washington were detained under assurances that notice should be given of any military movement. The notice was not addressed to them, but a messenger was sent to Charleston to give notice to the Governor of South Carolina, and the notice was so given at a late hour on the 8th of April, the eve of the very day on which the fleet might be expected to arrive. That this manoeuvre failed in its purpose was not the fault of those who control
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
ts reception by them, as follows: On the 12th of March I received a telegram from Postmaster—General Blair to come to Washington. I arrived there on the 13th. Mr. Blair having been acquainted with the proposition I presented to General Scott, under Mr. Buchanan's Administration, sent for me to tender the same to Mr. Lincoln, informing me that Lieutenant-General Scott had advised the President that the fort could not be relieved, and must be given up. Mr. Blair took me at once to the White House, and I explained the plan to the President. Thence we adjourned to Lieutenant-General Scott's office, where a renewed discussion of the subject took place. The General informed the President that my plan was practicable in February, but that the increased number of batteries erected at the mouth of the harbor since that time rendered it impossible in March. Finding that there was great opposition to any attempt at relieving Fort Sumter, and that Mr. Blair alone sustained the Presiden
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
in January to reenforce it by means of the Star of the West. This standing menace at the gates of the chief harbor of South Carolina had been tolerated by the government and people of that state, and afterward by the Confederate authorities, in the ary next day (the 8th) the following official notification (without date or signature) was read to Governor Pickens of South Carolina, and General Beauregard, in Charleston, by Chew, an official of the State Department (Seward's) in Washington, who saen at the very moment when a messenger from his own department was on the way to Charleston to notify the governor of South Carolina that faith would not be kept in the matter. It is scarcely necessary to say that the commissioners had, with good ment. The notice was not addressed to them, but a messenger was sent to Charleston to give notice to the Governor of South Carolina, and the notice was so given at a late hour on the 8th of April, the eve of the very day on which the fleet might be
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
opposition to any attempt at relieving Fort Sumter, and that Mr. Blair alone sustained the President in his policy of refusing to yield, I judged that my arguments in favor of the practicability of sending in supplies would be strengthened by a visit to Charleston and the fort. The President readily agreed to my visit, if the Secretary of War and General Scott raised no objection. Both these gentlemen consenting, I left Washington on the 19th of March, and, passing through Richmond and Wilmington, reached Charleston on the 21st. Thus we see that at the very moment when Secretary Seward was renewing to the Confederate government, through Judge Campbell, his positive assurance that the evacuation would take place, this emissary was on his way to Charleston to obtain information and devise measures by means of which this promise might be broken. On his arrival in Charleston, Fox tells us that he sought an interview with Captain Hartstein of the Confederate Navy, and through thi
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
Chapter 11: The commission to Washington city arrival of Crawford Buchanan's alarm note of the commissioners to the New Administration mediation of justices Nelson and Campbell the difficulty about forts Sumter and Pickens Secretary Seward's assurances duplicity of the Government at Washington Fox's visit to Charleston-secret preparations for coercive measures visit of Lamon renewed assurances of good faith notification to Governor Pickens developments of secret history systematic and complicated perfidy exposed. The appointment of commissioners to proceed to Washington, for the purpose of establishing friendly relations with the United States and effecting an equitable settlement of all questions relating to the common property of the states and the public debt, has already been mentioned. No time was lost in carrying this purpose into execution. Crawford—first of the commissioners—left Montgomery on or about February 27, and arrived in Washington two o
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
Chapter 11: The commission to Washington city arrival of Crawford Buchanan's alarm note of the commissioners to the New Administration mediation of justices Nelson and Campbell the difficulty about forts Sumter and Pickens Secretary Seward's assurances duplicity of the Government at Washington Fox's visit to Charleston-secret preparations for coercive measures visit of Lamon renewed assurances of good faith notification to Governor Pickens developments of secret history systematic and complicated perfidy exposed. The appointment of commissioners to proceed to Washington, for the purpose of establishing friendly relations with the United States and effecting an equitable settlement of all questions relating to the common property of the states and the public debt, has already been mentioned. No time was lost in carrying this purpose into execution. Crawford—first of the commissioners—left Montgomery on or about February 27, and arrived in Washington two or
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
f establishing friendly relations with the United States and effecting an equitable settlement of ahanan's term of office as President of the United States. Besides his official credentials, he boronfederate States to the Government of the United States; and I have now the honor to introduce himomise to receive a Commissioner from the Confederate States and the actual arrival of the Commissionr the presentation to the President of the United States of their credentials and the objects which of two judges of the Supreme Court of the United States—Justices Nelson of New York and Campbell oad very carefully examined the laws of the United States to enable him to attain his conclusions, atile preparations of the government of the United States, notwithstanding the secrecy with which thhim —that it was from the President of the United States, and delivered by him to Chew on the 6th—ts were received from the Government of the United States of its peaceful intentions—of its determin[19 more.
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