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G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 3.35
ing elapsed in this condition of affairs, the commissioners in Washington telegraphed Brigadier General Beauregard, commander of the Confederate forces at Charleston, inquiring whether the fort had betification (without date or signature) was read to Governor Pickens of South Carolina, and General Beauregard, in Charleston, by Chew, an official of the State Department (Seward's) in Washington, whovernment, before they ceased to be made. On April 8th they sent the following dispatch to General Beauregard: Washington, April 8, 1861. General G. T. Beauregard: Accounts uncertain, becGeneral G. T. Beauregard: Accounts uncertain, because of the constant vacillation of this Government. We were reassured yesterday that the status of Sumter would not be changed without previous notice to Governor Pickens, but we have no faith in th Federal administration. It was in these words: Washington, April 10, 1861. General G. T. Beauregard: The Tribune of to-day declares the main object of the expedition to be the relief of S
A. B. Roman (search for this): chapter 3.35
from Washington and returned to their homes. Their last dispatch, before leaving, shows that they were still dependent upon public rumor and the newspapers for information as to the real purposes and preparations of the Federal administration. It was in these words: Washington, April 10, 1861. General G. T. Beauregard: The Tribune of to-day declares the main object of the expedition to be the relief of Sumter, and that a force will be landed which will overcome all opposition. Roman, Crawford, and Forsyth. The annexed extracts from my message to the Confederate Congress at the opening of its special session on April 29, will serve as a recapitulation of the events above narrated, with all of comment that it was then, or is now, considered necessary to add: extracts from President's message to the Confederate Congress, of April 29, 1861. . . . Scarce had you assembled in February last, when, prior even to the inauguration of the Chief Magistrate you had ele
James Buchanan (search for this): chapter 3.35
The commission to Washington city arrival of Crawford Buchanan's alarm note of the commissioners to the New Administrat in Washington two or three days before the expiration of Buchanan's term of office as President of the United States. Besia part of it, should reach Washington before the close of Buchanan's term, that I had received an intimation from him, throu North and West as well as those of the South. . . . Mr. Buchanan, the President, was in a state of most thorough alarm, afety. This statement is in accord with a remark which Buchanan made to the author at an earlier period of the same sessi several years in Congress before the Administration of Mr. Buchanan, as well as during his official term, and had always be of Fort Sumter in February, during the administration of Buchanan. In a letter published in the newspapers since the war, ith the proposition I presented to General Scott, under Mr. Buchanan's Administration, sent for me to tender the same to Mr.
and communicated to the commissioners through the agency of two judges of the Supreme Court of the United States—Justices Nelson of New York and Campbell of Alabama. On March 15, according to the statement of Judge Campbell, See letter of Judge Campbell to Colonel George W. Munford in Papers of the Southern historical Society, appended to Southern Magazine for February, 1874. Justice Nelson visited the Secretaries of State and of the Treasury and the Attorney General (Seward, Chase, and Bates), to dissuade them from undertaking to put in execution any policy of coercion. During the term of the Supreme Court he had very carefully examined the laws of the United States to enable him to attain his conclusions, and from time to time he had consulted the Chief Justice [Taney] upon the questions which his examination had suggested. His conclusion was that, without very serious violations of Constitution and statutes, coercion could not be successfully effected by the executive depart
Colin Campbell (search for this): chapter 3.35
as much as the Administration can bear. Judge Campbell adds: I concurred in the conclusion thn, on the same day, to the commissioners. Judge Campbell tells us that Crawford was slow to consente of Seward to be reduced to writing, with Judge Campbell's personal assurance of its genuineness an take all the risks of sunshine.—Letter of Judge Campbell to Colonel Munford, as above. This writtenesent. Of the result of these interviews, Judge Campbell states: The last was full and satisfac dispatch of Governor Pickens was taken by Judge Campbell to Seward, who appointed the ensuing Mondaanswer. At that interview Seward informed Judge Campbell that the President was concerned about thet the fort was to be forthwith evacuated. Judge Campbell in his account of the interview, says: I aas addressed to Seward upon the subject by Judge Campbell, in behalf of the commissioners, again ask four days before Seward's assurance given Judge Campbell—after conference with the President—that t[10 more...
rts Sumter and Pickens Secretary Seward's assurances duplicity of the Government at Washington Fox's visit to Charleston-secret preparations for coercive measures visit of Lamon renewed assuranclies and reenforcements to the garrison, with the view of retaining possession of the fort! G. V. Fox, afterward Assistant Secretary of the United States Navy, had proposed a plan for reenforcing devise measures by means of which this promise might be broken. On his arrival in Charleston, Fox tells us that he sought an interview with Captain Hartstein of the Confederate Navy, and through ed to return in a very few days for that purpose. This, it will be remembered, occurred while Fox was making active, though secret, preparations for his relief expedition. Colonel, or Major Lapedition which had been secretly in preparation for some time at New York, under direction of Captain Fox, was now ready to sail, and might reasonably be expected to be at Charleston almost immediate
F. W. Pickens (search for this): chapter 3.35
assurances of good faith notification to Governor Pickens developments of secret history systemat him what I should say as to Sumter and as to Pickens. He authorized me to say that, before that ln the resolution in reference to Sumter or to Pickens. I repeated this assurance in writing to Judy, and through this officer obtained from Governor Pickens permission to visit Fort Sumter. He failis narrative, to state what we learn from Governor Pickens himself, Message to the legislature ofhe delay was accidental. The dispatch of Governor Pickens was taken by Judge Campbell to Seward, wh and reiterated, to the commissioners, to Governor Pickens, and to myself directly, that the fort way after the notification was delivered to Governor Pickens, and before preparation could be made to not be changed without previous notice to Governor Pickens, but we have no faith in them. The war p On the same day the announcement made to Governor Pickens through Chew was made known. The commiss[7 more...]
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 3.35
ion of the latter, where the new President [Mr. Lincoln, President-elect], the great political almomen, awaiting an opportunity, either to see Mr. Lincoln himself, or to communicate with him throughMarch 12—eight days after the inauguration of Lincoln—the two commissioners then present, Forsyth astration, sent for me to tender the same to Mr. Lincoln, informing me that Lieutenant-General Scott at Washington, his plan was approved by President Lincoln, and he was sent to New York to make arr, Colonel Lamon, was sent by the President [Mr. Lincoln], who informed me that he had come to try apublications made since the war by members of Lincoln's cabinet, it has been represented that durin, during this whole period of nearly a month, Lincoln was ignorant of the communications that were deon Welles, who was Secretary of the Navy in Lincoln's cabinet, gives the following account of oneo fit out an expedition to forward supplies. Lincoln and Seward, New York, 1874, pp. 57, 58. The i
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 3.35
g that through his agency these may be accomplished, I avail myself of this occasion to offer to you the assurance of my distinguished consideration. (Signed) Jefferson Davis. Montgomery, February 17, 1861. It may here be mentioned, in explanation of my desire that the commission, or at least a part of it, should reach Washingtsentiment, and that the evacuation of Sumter was sufficient for the present in that direction. I stated that I would see the Commissioners, and I would write to Mr. Davis to that effect. I asked him what I should say as to Sumter and as to Pickens. He authorized me to say that, before that letter could reach him [Mr. Davis], he Mr. Davis], he would learn by telegraph that the order for the evacuation of Sumter had been made. He said the condition of Pickens was satisfactory, and there would be no change made there. The italics in this extract are my own. The letter in which this promise was communicated to me has been lost, but it was given in substantially the terms
13th. Mr. Blair having been acquainted with the proposition I presented to General Scott, under Mr. Buchanan's Administration, sent for me to tender the same to Mr. Lincoln, informing me that Lieutenant-General Scott had advised the President that the fort could not be relieved, and must be given up. Mr. Blair took me at once tose, and I explained the plan to the President. Thence we adjourned to Lieutenant-General Scott's office, where a renewed discussion of the subject took place. The Gort. The President readily agreed to my visit, if the Secretary of War and General Scott raised no objection. Both these gentlemen consenting, I left Washington soon as assembled, the President informed them he had just been advised by General Scott that it was expedient to evacuate Fort Pickens, as well as Fort Sumter, whi A brief silence followed the announcement of the amazing recommendation of General Scott, when Mr. Blair, who had been much annoyed by the vacillating course of the
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