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Columbus (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
d Augusta one hundred and seventy-five miles. If I could be sure of finding provisions and ammunition at Augusta or Columbus, Georgia, I can march to Milledgeville and compel Hood to give up Augusta or Macon, and could then turn on the other. The cour part, unless the capture of the city can be followed by the occupation of the Alabama River and the railroad to Columbus, Georgia, when that place would be a magnificent auxiliary to my further progress into Georgia. * * * * If successful, I d strike for Savannah and its river; that General Canby should hold the Mississippi River, and send a force to take Columbus, Georgia, either by way of the Alabama or Appalachicola River; that I should keep Hood employed, and put my army in fine ord My line is so long now that it is impossible to protect it against cavalry raids; but if we can get Montgomery and Columbus, Georgia, as bases in connection with Atlanta, we have Georgia and Alabama at our feet. You ought to have more men, and it
Selma (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
s will have a force strong enough to prevent his reaching any country in which we have an interest, and he has orders, if Hood turns to follow me, to push for Selma, Alabama. No single army can catch Hood, and I am convinced the best results will follow from our defeating Jeff. Davis' cherished plan of making me leave Georgia by l proceed eastward as far as Meridan, at least, and will thoroughly destroy the roads east and south from there, and, if possible, will throw troops as far east as Selma; or if he finds Mobile so far unguarded as to make his force sufficient for the enterprise, will go there. To cooperate with this movement, you want to keep up ap with Sherman on the sea-coast must now be sent from here. The question is whether, under such circumstances, Augusta and Savannah would not be a better line than Selma, Montgomery, and Mobile. I think Savannah might be taken by surprise with one corps from here and such troops as Foster could spare from the Department of the Sou
Milledgeville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
phed the condition of affairs to Halleck, saying, among other things, I prefer for the future to make the movement on Milledgeville, Millen, and Savannah. On that day (October 1) he telegraphed Grant:. * * * * Why will it not do to leave Tenn* * * * I propose that we break up the rail-road from Chattanooga forward, and that we strike out with our wagons for Milledgeville, Millen, and Savannah. * * * * I can make this march, and make Georgia howl! October 10th he telegraphed Thomas y-five miles. If I could be sure of finding provisions and ammunition at Augusta or Columbus, Georgia, I can march to Milledgeville and compel Hood to give up Augusta or Macon, and could then turn on the other. The country will afford forage and ma, S. C., Ossabaw Sound, Ga., Pensacola and Mobile Bays. I will turn up somewhere, and, believe me, I can take Macon, Milledgeville, Augusta, and Savannah, Ga., and wind up with closing the neckband of Charleston so that they will starve out. Th
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
propose that we break up the rail-road from Chattanooga forward, and that we strike out with our waps was ordered from Gaylesville to march to Chattanooga and thence to report for orders to General hed for Resaca, and there took the cars for Chattanooga. I then knew that General Thomas would hav 19, 1864. Major-General George H. Thomas, Chattanooga. Owing to the presence of Longstreet in pearances of preparation of an advance from Chattanooga. It may be necessary even to move a columnlowing telegram: [By telegraph from Chattanooga, February 28, 1864.] Major-General Grant, enson, Bridgeport, Huntsville, Decatur, and Chattanooga, to keep open our communications, and hold tenant-General, had planned a movement from Chattanooga through to Mobile, and that he then had in eneral situation, it is as follows: Chattanooga, December 7, 1863. Major-General Halleck, to be permanently held by sixty thousand at Chattanooga, one hundred thousand at Atlanta, sixty tho[21 more...]
Decatur (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
y direction; but I regard the pursuit of Hood as useless. Still, if he attempts to invade Middle Tennessee, I will hold Decatur, and be prepared to move in that direction; but, unless I let go of Atlanta, my force will not be equal to his. From sending in estimates of the number of troops needed to guard the roads and bridges from Nashville south, both by way of Decatur and of Stevenson, on to Chattanooga, and south to Atlanta. This appears clearly enough from the following telegram: o guard that line, two regiments of which force should be cavalry. From what I know of the road between Nashville and Decatur, two thousand infantry and two thousand cavalry will be sufficient to protect that line. One thousand infantry will be e balance of my force was distributed along the railroad, and posted at Murfreesboro, Stevenson, Bridgeport, Huntsville, Decatur, and Chattanooga, to keep open our communications, and hold the posts above named, if attacked, until they could be reen
Savannah (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Sherman replied that it would risk his whole army to move as suggested by Grant, unless the latter could capture the Savannah River up to Augusta, or the Chattahoochee up to Columbus. The following is this reply, dated September 10, 8 P. M.: In scattering for forage we have a great many men picked up by the enemy's cavalry. If you can manage to take the Savannah River as high as Augusta, or the Chattahoochee as far up as Columbus, I can sweep the whole State of Georgia, otherwise I wto Georgia. * * * * If successful, I suppose that Fort Caswell will be occupied, and the fleet at once sent to the Savannah River. Then the reduction of that city is the next question. It once in our possession, and the river open to us, I would staff officer. He is ready to attempt (and feels confident of his ability to succeed) to make his way to either the Savannah River or any of the navigable streams emptying into the Atlantic or Gulf, if he is only certain of finding a base open for
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
r-General. headquarters Military division of the Mississippi. In the field, Atlanta, Georgia, September 10, 1864. General Canby, New Orleans. Dispatch of the 27th received. I got to Atlanta by a couple of good moves. You succeeded at Fort Morgan sooner than I expected. We must have the Alabama River now, and also the Appalachicola at the old arsenal, and up to Columbus. My line is so long now that it is impossible to protect it against cavalry raids; but if we can get Montgomery andes of cotton near Albany and Fort Gaines. This, however, would leave the army in a bad position for future movements. The third, down the Chattahoochee to Opelika and Montgomery, thence to Pensacola or Tensas Bayou, in communication with Fort Morgan. This latter route would enable me at once to cooperate with General Canby in the reduction of Mobile, and occupation of the line of the Alabama. In my judgment the first would have a material effect upon your campaign in Virginia; the s
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
to break it up, and to get into the interior of the enemy's country as far as you can, inflicting all the damage you can against their war resources. I do not propose to lay down for you a plan of campaign, but simply to lay down the work it is desirable to have done, and leave you free to execute in your own way. Submit to me, however, as early as you can, your plan of operations. As stated Banks is ordered to commence operations as soon as he can. Gilmore is ordered to report at Fortress Monroe by the 18th inst., or as soon thereafter as practicable. Sigel is concentrating now. None will move from their places of rendezvous until I direct except Banks. I want to be ready to move by the 25th inst. if possible; but all I can now direct is that you get ready as soon as possible. I know you will have difficulties to encounter getting through the mountains to where supplies are abundant, but I believe you will accomplish it. From the expedition from the Department of West Vir
Rome, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
sed at first to add only the Fourth Corps (General Stanley), fifteen thousand, and that corps was ordered from Gaylesville to march to Chattanooga and thence to report for orders to General Thomas; but subsequently, on the 30th of October, at Rome, Georgia, learning from General Thomas that the new troops promised by General Grant were coming forward very slowly, I concluded to further reinforce him by General Schofield's corps (Twenty-third), twelve thousand, which corps accordingly marched foless, and he will go in one direction while you are pushing in the other. If you can see a chance of destroying Hood's army, attend to that first and make your other move secondary. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. My answer is dated: Rome, Ga., November 2, 1864. General Grant. Your dispatch is received. If I could hope to overhaul Hood I would turn against him with my whole force; then he would retreat to the south-west, drawing me as a decoy away from Georgia, which is his chie
Apalachicola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Georgia with sixty thousand men, hauling some stores and depending on the country for the balance. Where a million of people find subsistence, my army won't starve. * * * * I will, therefore, give it as my opinion that your army and Canby's should be reenforced to the maximum; that, after you get Wilmington, you should strike for Savannah and its river; that General Canby should hold the Mississippi River, and send a force to take Columbus, Georgia, either by way of the Alabama or Appalachicola River; that I should keep Hood employed, and put my army in fine order for a march on Augusta, Columbia, and Charleston, and start as soon as Wilmington is sealed to commerce, and the city of Savannah is in our possession. * * * * If you will secure Wilmington and the city of Savannah from your center, and let General Canby have command over the Mississippi River and the country west of it, I will send a force to the Alabama and Appalachicola, provided you give me one hundred thousand of
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