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Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
J. Smith's troops) a force large enough to whip Hood in a fair fight was correct. There was no peace at headquarters till this doubt was fully resolved, and the painful suspense removed by the news of final and complete victory at Nashville. This victory was full deliverance for General Sherman from the verdict he had recorded as the march began, when he wrote: Should we fail, this march would be adjudged the wild adventure of a crazy fool. Had Hood defeated Thomas, or reached the Ohio River, this verdict would assuredly have passed into history. And so, considering the bearings which the battle of Nashville had upon Sherman's campaign to the sea, his best friends may well be surprised to find his book stained by unjust reflections upon Thomas. The following extracts from the Memoirs indicate the treatment which this branch of the subject receives: As soon as the army had reached Savannah, and had opened communication with the fleet, I endeavored to ascertain what ha
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
. H. Wilson had collected in Nashville about ten thousand dismounted cavalry, for which he was rapidly collecting the necessary horses for a remount. All these aggregated about forty-five thousand men. General A. J. Smith at that time was in Missouri with the two divisions of the Sixteenth Corps which had been diverted to that quarter to assist General Rosecrans in driving the rebel General Price out of Missouri. This object had been accomplished, and these troops, numbering from eight to tMissouri. This object had been accomplished, and these troops, numbering from eight to ten thousand, had been ordered to Nashville. To these I proposed at first to add only the Fourth Corps (General Stanley), fifteen thousand, and that corps was ordered from Gaylesville to march to Chattanooga and thence to report for orders to General Thomas; but subsequently, on the 30th of October, at Rome, Georgia, learning from General Thomas that the new troops promised by General Grant were coming forward very slowly, I concluded to further reinforce him by General Schofield's corps (Twenty
Tuscumbia (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
he object was to procure General Grant's permission to march for the sea without first destroying Hood. From Resaca on November 1st, he telegraphed Grant as follows: As you foresaw, and as Jeff. Davis threatened, the enemy is now in the full tide of execution of his grand plan to destroy my communications and defeat this army. His infantry, about thirty thousand (30,000), with Wheeler and Roddy's cavalry, from seven to ten thousand (7,000 to 10,000), are now in the neighborhood of Tuscumbia and Florence, and the water being low, are able to cross at will. * * * * General Thomas has near Athens and Pulaski, Stanley's corps, about fifteen thousand strong, and Schofield's corps, ten thousand, en route by rail, and has at least twenty to twenty-five thousand men, with new regiments and conscripts arriving all the time, also. General Rosecrans promises the two divisions of Smith and Mower, belonging to me, but I doubt if they can reach Tennessee in less than ten days. * * * *
Bridgeport, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
e dispatch of November 1st fixed it at from sixty-three to seventy thousand. Says General Sherman, Vol. II, page 162: He then had at Nashville about eight or ten thousand new troops, and as many more civil employes of the quartermaster's department, which were not suited for the field, but would be most useful in manning the excellent forts that already covered Nashville. At Chattanooga he had General Steedman's division, about five thousand men, besides garrisons for Chattanooga, Bridgeport, and Stevenson; at Murfreesboro he also had General Rousseau's division, which was full five thousand strong, independent of the necessary garrisons for the railroad. At Decatur and Huntsville, Alabama, was the infantry division of General R. S. Granger, estimated at four thousand, and near Florence, Alabama, watching the crossings of the Tennessee, were General Edward Hatch's division of cavalry, four thousand; General Croxton's brigade, twenty-five hundred, and Colonel Capron's brigade,
Columbia, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
troops) a force large enough to whip Hood in a fair fight was correct. I approve of Thomas' allowing Hood to come north far enough to enable him to concentrate his own men, though I would have preferred that Hood should have been checked about Columbia. Still, if Thomas followed up his success of the 15th, and gave Hood a good whaling, and is at this moment following him closely, the whole campaign in any division will be even more perfect than the Atlanta campaign, for at this end of the linis letter, he had written General Webster in the one already quoted: I approve of Thomas' allowing Hood to come north far enough to enable him to concentrate his own men, though I would have preferred that Hood should have been checked about Columbia. And in the text of his Memoirs, only a few pages in advance of where he reproduces this paragraph, after enumerating all the force available about Pulaski, he writes, as already quoted: This force aggregated about thirty thousand men,
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
r he entered Savannah to General Webster, at Nashville, Sherman said in a letter, referred to in thby the news of final and complete victory at Nashville. This victory was full deliverance for Gene strong army, capable, not only of defending Nashville, but of beating Hood in the open field. Yet Thomas remained inside of Nashville, seemingly passive, until General Hood had closed upon him andthe highest terms. His brilliant victory at Nashville was necessary to mine at Savannah to make a nstructed General Thomas to hold defensively Nashville, Chattanooga, and Decatur, all strongly forto thousand. Thomas was instructed to hold Nashville defensively. To write at this late day ofecember 23, 1864. General J. D. Webster, Nashville, Tenn. Dear General: Major Dixon arrived last general advance, to fall back slowly toward Nashville, fighting till he should be reenforced by Geuregard (Hood) would attempt to work against Nashville: I can hardly believe that Beauregard wo[23 more...]
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
any more civil employes of the quartermaster's department, which were not suited for the field, but would be most useful in manning the excellent forts that already covered Nashville. At Chattanooga he had General Steedman's division, about five thousand men, besides garrisons for Chattanooga, Bridgeport, and Stevenson; at Murfreesboro he also had General Rousseau's division, which was full five thousand strong, independent of the necessary garrisons for the railroad. At Decatur and Huntsville, Alabama, was the infantry division of General R. S. Granger, estimated at four thousand, and near Florence, Alabama, watching the crossings of the Tennessee, were General Edward Hatch's division of cavalry, four thousand; General Croxton's brigade, twenty-five hundred, and Colonel Capron's brigade, twelve hundred. Besides which General J. H. Wilson had collected in Nashville about ten thousand dismounted cavalry, for which he was rapidly collecting the necessary horses for a remount. All th
Franklin (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ge of the war, but all information seems to point that way. Why General Thomas did not turn on Hood at Franklin appears from the following field dispatches from General Schofield, who was fighting a splendid battle at that place: Franklin, Tenn., November 30, 1864, 12 M. Major-General Thomas, Nashville. Your dispatch of 10:25 A. M. is received. I am satisfied that I have heretofore run too much risk in trying to hold Hood in check while so far inferior to him in both infantry a and in fighting condition, we can whip Hood easily, and I believe make the campaign a decisive one. Before that the most we can do is to husband our strength and increase it as much as possible. * * * * J. M. Schofield, Major-General Franklin, Tenn., November 30, 3 P. M. Major-General Thomas, Nashville. I have just received your dispatch, asking whether I can hold Hood here three days. I do not believe I can. I can doubtless hold him one day, but will hazard something in doing that.
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
d it at from sixty-three to seventy thousand. Says General Sherman, Vol. II, page 162: He then had at Nashville about eight or ten thousand new troops, and as many more civil employes of the quartermaster's department, which were not suited for the field, but would be most useful in manning the excellent forts that already covered Nashville. At Chattanooga he had General Steedman's division, about five thousand men, besides garrisons for Chattanooga, Bridgeport, and Stevenson; at Murfreesboro he also had General Rousseau's division, which was full five thousand strong, independent of the necessary garrisons for the railroad. At Decatur and Huntsville, Alabama, was the infantry division of General R. S. Granger, estimated at four thousand, and near Florence, Alabama, watching the crossings of the Tennessee, were General Edward Hatch's division of cavalry, four thousand; General Croxton's brigade, twenty-five hundred, and Colonel Capron's brigade, twelve hundred. Besides which
Brentwood, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
bly two corps, in my front, and seems preparing to cross the river above and below. I think he can effect a crossing to-morrow in spite of all my efforts to prevent, or to-night if he attempts it. A worse place than this for an inferior force could hardly be found. I will refer your question to General Wilson this evening, yet fear he can do very little. I have no doubt Forrest will be in my rear to-morrow doing some greater mischief. It appears to me that I ought to take position at Brentwood at once. If A. J. Smith's division and the Murfreesboro garrison join me there, I ought to be able to hold Hood in check for some time. I have just learned that the enemy's cavalry is already crossing three miles below. I will have lively times with my trains again. J. M. Schofield, Major-General. And, if all thus far related is not enough to show that there was nothing in the situation at Nashville surpassing Sherman's understanding, the terms of the congratulatory order he pri
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