hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. T. Sherman 1,208 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 787 13 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 624 16 Browse Search
H. W. Halleck 393 13 Browse Search
Hood 322 10 Browse Search
W. S. Rosecrans 314 0 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 248 18 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 248 2 Browse Search
J. M. Schofield 223 3 Browse Search
Savannah (Georgia, United States) 215 9 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid. Search the whole document.

Found 169 total hits in 75 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
gadier-general that his antipathy to staff duty began. But from that time forward it has been marked. Even the large body of staff officers in his own army, who, on the Atlanta campaign, had been continuously on duty and most of the time under fire from May till September, did not escape being made to feel this prejudice. While the army was moving from Atlanta on Hood, who had passed to its rear, Lieutenant-Colonel Warner, inspector-general on the staff, was appointed by the Governor of Ohio to the command of one of the new regiments from that State. Whereupon General Sherman issued the following order: [special field orders no. 98.] headquarters Military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Summerville, Ga., October 19, 1864. 1st. Lieutenant-Colonel Willard Warner, acting Inspector-General on the staff of this military division, having been appointed colonel of the One-Hundred and Eightieth Ohio, is hereby relieved from duty at these headquarters, and will p
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
rs no. 11.] headquarters of the Army, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 8, 1869. The following orders of the President of the United States are published for the information and government of all concerned: War Department, Washington city, March 5, 1869. By direction of the President General William T. Sherman will assume command of the Army of the United States. The Chiefs of Staff Corps, Departments, and Bureaus will report to and act under the immediate orders of [General orders no. 28.] headquarters of the Army, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 27, 1869. The following orders, received from the War Department, are published for the government of all concerned: War Department, Washington city, March 26, 1869. By direction of the President, the order of the Secretary of War, dated War Department, March 5, 1869, and published in General Orders No. 11, Headquarters of the Army, Adjutant-General's office, dated March 8, 1869, ex
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
the time under fire from May till September, did not escape being made to feel this prejudice. While the army was moving from Atlanta on Hood, who had passed to its rear, Lieutenant-Colonel Warner, inspector-general on the staff, was appointed by the Governor of Ohio to the command of one of the new regiments from that State. Whereupon General Sherman issued the following order: [special field orders no. 98.] headquarters Military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Summerville, Ga., October 19, 1864. 1st. Lieutenant-Colonel Willard Warner, acting Inspector-General on the staff of this military division, having been appointed colonel of the One-Hundred and Eightieth Ohio, is hereby relieved from duty at these headquarters, and will proceed to Nashville and assume command of his new regiment. 2d. The General commanding thanks Colonel Warner for his most zealous and intelligent service during the past campaign, compliments him on his good sense in preferring
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
g to be relieved from staff duty, and under the circumstances, General Sherman's order was to these officers both a cruel wrong and a gratuitous insult. But if General Sherman in writing his final chapter had remembered the facts set forth in the opening of his book, he might have tempered his language in regard to staff service. The Memoirs begin with the information that in the Spring of 1846 he was first-lieutenant in the Third Artillery, and present with his company at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina. In April of the same year he was detailed for recruiting service. In June he was ordered to California with Company F of his regiment, and assigned to staff duty as quartermaster and commissary. In March, 1847, he returned to company duty. The next month (April) he was assigned as aid-de-camp to General Kearney. In May General Kearney left California, and Lieutenant Sherman became acting assistant adjutant-general on the staff of Colonel R. B. Mason. In February, 1849, he
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
information that in the Spring of 1846 he was first-lieutenant in the Third Artillery, and present with his company at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina. In April of the same year he was detailed for recruiting service. In June he was ordered to California with Company F of his regiment, and assigned to staff duty as quartermaster and commissary. In March, 1847, he returned to company duty. The next month (April) he was assigned as aid-de-camp to General Kearney. In May General Kearney left CaCalifornia, and Lieutenant Sherman became acting assistant adjutant-general on the staff of Colonel R. B. Mason. In February, 1849, he was relieved from this service and assigned in the same capacity to the staff of General Persifer F. Smith. While thus acting his duties were changed to those of aid-de-camp on the same staff, in which capacity he continued to act until September, 1850, when he rejoined his company in St. Louis with the assurance that he would soon receive a regular staff appoint
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
nd of one of the new regiments from that State. Whereupon General Sherman issued the following order: [special field orders no. 98.] headquarters Military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Summerville, Ga., October 19, 1864. 1st. Lieutenant-Colonel Willard Warner, acting Inspector-General on the staff of this military division, having been appointed colonel of the One-Hundred and Eightieth Ohio, is hereby relieved from duty at these headquarters, and will proceed to Nashville and assume command of his new regiment. 2d. The General commanding thanks Colonel Warner for his most zealous and intelligent service during the past campaign, compliments him on his good sense in preferring service with troops to staff duty, and predicts for him the highest success in his professional career. By order of Major-General W. T. Sherman. Colonel Warner was an able and gallant officer. As lieutenant-colonel of an Ohio regiment, he was detailed for duty on the staff
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ess will follow suit. General Sherman's own military history, however, will show that it was not until he attained the rank of brigadier-general that his antipathy to staff duty began. But from that time forward it has been marked. Even the large body of staff officers in his own army, who, on the Atlanta campaign, had been continuously on duty and most of the time under fire from May till September, did not escape being made to feel this prejudice. While the army was moving from Atlanta on Hood, who had passed to its rear, Lieutenant-Colonel Warner, inspector-general on the staff, was appointed by the Governor of Ohio to the command of one of the new regiments from that State. Whereupon General Sherman issued the following order: [special field orders no. 98.] headquarters Military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Summerville, Ga., October 19, 1864. 1st. Lieutenant-Colonel Willard Warner, acting Inspector-General on the staff of this military divis
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
departments are selected and chosen from the army itself, or fresh from West Point, and too commonly construe themselves into the élite, as made of better clay than the common soldier. Thus they separate themselves more and more from their comrades of the line, and in process of time realize the condition of that old officer of artillery, who thought the army would be a delightful place for a gentleman if it were not for the d—d soldier; or, better still, the conclusion of the young lord in Henry IV., who told Harry Percy (Hotspur) that but for these vile guns he would himself have been a soldier. This is all wrong; utterly at variance with our democratic form of government and of universal experience; and now that the French, from whom we had copied the system, have utterly prescribed it, I hope that our Congress will follow suit. General Sherman's own military history, however, will show that it was not until he attained the rank of brigadier-general that his antipathy to sta
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
The following orders of the President of the United States are published for the information and government 1869. By direction of the President of the United States, the undersigned hereby assumes command of the Ae of the President, to command the armies of the United States. The same act authorized him to select for serve Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States. The departments of war and of the navy are ther orders, but the orders of the President of the United States.—[1 Opinions, 380. By the act of August 7, d on or intrusted to him by the President of the United States, agreeable to the Constitution relative to militor naval forces, ships or warlike stores of the United States, or to such other matters respecting military or naval affairs as the President of the United States shall assign to the said department. Subsequently, upe of the President, to command the armies of the United States—he insisted upon being allowed to exercise that
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
he same issues which he raised with the Secretary of War and the statute law, when he assumed the duties of general and promulgated an order assigning all officials in the War Department, except the Secretary himself, and possibly his chief clerk, to duty on his staff. In his treatment of this question he indulges in many undignified sneers at staff officers. For example: The subordinates of these staff-corps and departments are selected and chosen from the army itself, or fresh from West Point, and too commonly construe themselves into the élite, as made of better clay than the common soldier. Thus they separate themselves more and more from their comrades of the line, and in process of time realize the condition of that old officer of artillery, who thought the army would be a delightful place for a gentleman if it were not for the d—d soldier; or, better still, the conclusion of the young lord in Henry IV., who told Harry Percy (Hotspur) that but for these vile guns he would
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...