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We had not broken the rebel line at either point, but our assaulting columns held their ground within a few yards of the rebel trenches, and there covered themselves with parapet. McPherson lost about five hundred men and several valuable officers, and Thomas lost nearly two thousand men. * * * * While the battle was in progress at the center, Schofield crossed Olley's Creek on the right, and gained a position threatening Johnston's line of retreat; and to increase the effect, I ordered Stoneman's cavalry to proceed rapidly still further to the right to Sweetwater. Satisfied of the bloody cost of attacking intrenched lines, I at once thought of moving the whole army to the railroad at a point (Fulton) about ten miles below Marietta, or to the Chattahoochee River itself, a movement similar to the one afterward so successfully practiced at Atlanta. All the orders were issued to bring forward supplies enough to fill our wagons, intending to strip the railroad back to Allatoona, and
as Harker and Dan. McCook. McPherson lost two or three of his young and dashing officers, which is apt to be the case in unsuccessful assaults. Had we broken the line to-day it would have been most decisive; but, as it is, our loss is small compared with some of those East. It should not in the least discourage us. At times assaults are necessary and inevitable. At Arkansas Post we succeeded; at Vicksburg we failed. I do not think our loss to-day greater than Johnston's when he attacked Hooker and Schofield the first day we occupied our present ground. The excuses made to General Thomas for the assault in the last part of the above dispatch are significant. The same evening he telegraphed Halleck, intimating as a reason for the assault that the position could not well be turned without abandoning the railroad: I can not well turn the position of the enemy without abandoning my railroad, and we are already so far from our supplies that it is as much as the road can do
Joe Johnston (search for this): chapter 9
e railroad with ten days supplies in wagons. Johnston may come out of his intrenchments to attack Tumberland, stretching down the Nickajack; but Johnston detected the movement, and promptly abandonedrsuit by every possible road, hoping to catch Johnston in the confusion of retreat, especially at thurner's Ferry of the Chattahoochee, we forced Johnston to choose between a direct assault on Thomas'e claimed that it was the assault which fixed Johnston's attention, and required help from his flank I do not think our loss to-day greater than Johnston's when he attacked Hooker and Schofield the fad of George Thomas' whole army right through Johnston's deployed line, on the best ground for go-ahad the assault succeeded, I could have broken Johnston's center and pushed his army back in confusiourner's Ferry of the Chattahoochee, we forced Johnston to choose between a direct assault on Thomas'ven by the head of our infantry columns. But Johnston had in advance cleared and multiplied his roa[3 more...]
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 9
on may come out of his intrenchments to attack Thomas, which is exactly what I want, for General Thod, June 27, 11:45 A. M.: Neither McPherson nor Thomas has succeeded in breaking through, but each had. The following parts of dispatches to General Thomas bear upon the same point: Sherman to ThThomas, June 27, 1:30 P. M.: Schofield has one division close up on the Powder Spring road, and the ottwo miles to his right and rear. Sherman to Thomas, June 27, 4:10 P. M.: Schofield has gained theKeep things moving. 9:50 A. M. W. T. S. Thomas to Sherman, 10:45 A. M., June 27: Yours receivntain. A little later Sherman again urged Thomas to make a second assault, as the following dislf decidedly against a second assault: Thomas to Sherman, 1:40 P. M., 27th June: Your disned the following very decided answer: Thomas to Sherman, June 27: Your dispatch of 2:25 ispatches were answered as follows, Sherman to Thomas, June 27th, 9:30 P. M.: According to Merrill's[31 more...]
l. I have not yet received report from Palmer. Answered as follows: All well. Keep things moving. 9:50 A. M. W. T. S. Thomas to Sherman, 10:45 A. M., June 27: Yours received. General Harker's brigade advanced to within twenty paces of the enemy's breast-works, and was repulsed with canister at that range, General Harker losing an arm. General Wagner's brigade of Newton's division, supporting General Harker, was so severely handled that it is compelled to reorganize. Colonel Mitchell's brigade of Davis' division captured one line of rebel breastworks, which they still hold. McCook's brigade was also very severely handled, nearly every colonel being killed or wounded. Colonel McCook wounded. It is compelled to fall back and reorganize. The troops are all too much exhausted to advance, but we hold all we have gained. General Sherman upon receiving this urged another attempt to break the line, as follows: Sherman to Thomas, June 27, 11:45 A. M.: McPherson's
e celebrated our Fourth of July, by a noisy but not a desperate battle, designed chiefly to hold the enemy there till Generals McPherson and Schofield could get well into position below him, near the Chattahoochee crossings. It was here that General Noyes, late Governor of Ohio, lost his leg. * * * * During the night Johnston drew back all his army and trains inside the tete du-pont at the Chattahoochee, which proved one of the strongest pieces of field fortification I ever saw. This noisampaign, and one of the very few instances where heavy intrenchments were carried by direct assault. General Sherman ordered General McPherson to attack these lines, and he in turn, forwarded the order to General Dodge, directing the latter to move against the works if he thought he could carry them. They were stormed, General Noyes of Ohio, having prominent command in the charging column, and carried. As a consequence, the rebels' let go the strong line of Smyrna camp ground and retreated.
k, and Schofield reports the same. Push your troops with all the energy possible. W. T. S. Thomas to Sherman, in the field, 9 A. M., June 27: General Howard reports that he has advanced and is doing well. I have not yet received report from Palmer. Answered as follows: All well. Keep things moving. 9:50 A. M. W. T. S. Thomas to Sherman, 10:45 A. M., June 27: Yours received. General Harker's brigade advanced to within twenty paces of the enemy's breast-works, and was repu besides some six or eight field officers killed. Both General Harker and Colonel McCook were wounded on the enemy's breastworks, and all say that had they not been wounded we would have driven the enemy from his works. Both Generals Howard and Palmer think that they can find favorable positions on their lines for placing batteries for enfilading the enemy's works. We took between ninety and one hundred prisoners. Sherman to Thomas, June 27, evening: Let your troops fortify as close up to
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 9
to leave the railroad; but something had to be done, and I had resolved on this move, as reported in my dispatch to General Halleck on July 1st: General Schofield is now south of Olley's Creek, and on the head of Nickajack. I have been hurryingeneral Thomas for the assault in the last part of the above dispatch are significant. The same evening he telegraphed Halleck, intimating as a reason for the assault that the position could not well be turned without abandoning the railroad: e from our railroad? It would bring matters to a crisis, and Schofield has secured the way. But his excuses to Generals Halleck and Grant a few days later cap the climax of all which the records contain in regard to Kenesaw. Witness the following: Sherman to Halleck, July 9: The assault I made was no mistake. I had to do it. The enemy, and our own army and officers, had settled down into the conviction that the assault of lines formed no part of my game, and the moment the enemy was
y possible. W. T. S. Thomas to Sherman, in the field, 9 A. M., June 27: General Howard reports that he has advanced and is doing well. I have not yet received report from Palmer. Answered as follows: All well. Keep things moving. 9:50 A. M. W. T. S. Thomas to Sherman, 10:45 A. M., June 27: Yours received. General Harker's brigade advanced to within twenty paces of the enemy's breast-works, and was repulsed with canister at that range, General Harker losing an arm. General Wagner's brigade of Newton's division, supporting General Harker, was so severely handled that it is compelled to reorganize. Colonel Mitchell's brigade of Davis' division captured one line of rebel breastworks, which they still hold. McCook's brigade was also very severely handled, nearly every colonel being killed or wounded. Colonel McCook wounded. It is compelled to fall back and reorganize. The troops are all too much exhausted to advance, but we hold all we have gained. General S
same. Push your troops with all the energy possible. W. T. S. Thomas to Sherman, in the field, 9 A. M., June 27: General Howard reports that he has advanced and is doing well. I have not yet received report from Palmer. Answered as follows: , but he can hold his position, put in one or two batteries to-night, and probably drive them out to-morrow morning. General Howard reports the same. Their works are from six to seven feet high and nine feet thick. In front of Howard they have a vHoward they have a very strong abattis. Davis' loss in officers has been very heavy. Nearly all the field officers of McCook's brigade, with McCook have been killed or wounded. From what the officers tell me I do not think we can carry the works by assault at this poenemy's breastworks, and all say that had they not been wounded we would have driven the enemy from his works. Both Generals Howard and Palmer think that they can find favorable positions on their lines for placing batteries for enfilading the enem
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