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This not having occurred, it became necessary to dislodge the garrisons from those positions before concentrating the army west of the mountains. For this purpose General Jackson marched very rapidly, crossed the Potomac near Williamsport on the 11th, sent Hill's division directly to Martinsburg, and disposed of the rest of the command so as to cut off retreat to the westward. The enemy evacuated Martinsburg and retired to Harpers Ferry on the night of the 11th, and Jackson entered the former11th, and Jackson entered the former on the 12th. Meanwhile General McLaws had been ordered to seize Maryland Heights on the north side of the Potomac, opposite Harpers Ferry, and General Waller took possession of Loudoun Heights, on the east side of the Shenandoah where it unites with the Potomac, and was in readiness to open fire upon Harpers Ferry. But McLaws found the heights in possession of the foe, with infantry and artillery protected by entrenchments. On the 13th he assailed the works, and after a spirited contest they
having occurred, it became necessary to dislodge the garrisons from those positions before concentrating the army west of the mountains. For this purpose General Jackson marched very rapidly, crossed the Potomac near Williamsport on the 11th, sent Hill's division directly to Martinsburg, and disposed of the rest of the command so as to cut off retreat to the westward. The enemy evacuated Martinsburg and retired to Harpers Ferry on the night of the 11th, and Jackson entered the former on the 12th. Meanwhile General McLaws had been ordered to seize Maryland Heights on the north side of the Potomac, opposite Harpers Ferry, and General Waller took possession of Loudoun Heights, on the east side of the Shenandoah where it unites with the Potomac, and was in readiness to open fire upon Harpers Ferry. But McLaws found the heights in possession of the foe, with infantry and artillery protected by entrenchments. On the 13th he assailed the works, and after a spirited contest they were carr
ry on the night of the 11th, and Jackson entered the former on the 12th. Meanwhile General McLaws had been ordered to seize Maryland Heights on the north side of the Potomac, opposite Harpers Ferry, and General Waller took possession of Loudoun Heights, on the east side of the Shenandoah where it unites with the Potomac, and was in readiness to open fire upon Harpers Ferry. But McLaws found the heights in possession of the foe, with infantry and artillery protected by entrenchments. On the 13th he assailed the works, and after a spirited contest they were carried; the troops made good their retreat to Harpers Ferry, and on the next day its investment was complete. At the same time that the march of these troops upon Harpers Ferry began, the remainder of General Longstreet's command and the division of D. H. Hill crossed the South Mountain and moved toward Boonsboro. General Stuart with the cavalry remained east of the mountains to observe the enemy and retard his advance. Long
e with the rest of our army. This movement, skillfully and efficiently covered by the cavalry brigade of General Fitzhugh Lee, was accomplished without interruption. The advance of McClellan's army did not appear on the west side of the pass at Boonsboro until about 8 A. M. on the following morning. The resistance that our troops had offered there secured sufficient time to enable General Jackson to complete the reduction of Harpers Ferry. The attack on the garrison began at dawn on the 15th. A rapid and vigorous fire was opened by the batteries of General Jackson, in conjunction with those on Maryland and Loudoun Heights. In about two hours the garrison, consisting of more than eleven thousand men, surrendered. Seventy-three pieces of artillery, about thirteen thousand small arms, and a large quantity of military stores fell into our hands. General A. P. Hill remained formally to receive the surrender of the troops and to secure the captured property. The commands of Long
commands of Longstreet and D. H. Hill reached Sharpsburg on the morning of the 15th. General Jackson arrived early on the 16th, and General J. G. Walker came up in the afternoon. The movements of General McLaws were embarrased by the presence of the side of the Antietam until about 2 P. M. During the afternoon the batteries on each side were partially engaged. On the 16th the artillery fire became warm, and continued throughout the day. A column crossed the Antietam beyond the reach of our bars with General Lee, is more comprehensive, embracing the other forces besides Hood's brigade: On the afternoon of the 16th, General McClellan directed an attack by Hooker's corps on the Confederate left—Hood's two brigades—and during the whole obattle was waged, with varying intensity, along the entire line. When the issue was first joined, on the afternoon of the 16th, General Lee had with him less than eighteen thousand men, consisting of the commands of Longstreet and D. H. Hill, the tw
varying intensity, along the entire line. When the issue was first joined, on the afternoon of the 16th, General Lee had with him less than eighteen thousand men, consisting of the commands of Longstreet and D. H. Hill, the two divisions of Jackson, and two brigades under Walker. Couriers were sent to the rear to hurry up the divisions of A. P. Hill, Anderson, and McLaws, hastening from Harper's Ferry, and these several commands, as they reached the front at intervals during the day, on the 17th, were immediately deployed and put to work. Every man was engaged. We had no reserve. The fighting was heaviest and most continuous on the Confederate left. It is established by Federal evidence that the three corps of Hooker, Mansfield, and Sumner were completely shattered in the repeated but fruitless efforts to turn this flank, and two of these corps were rendered useless for further aggressive movements. The aggregate strength of the attacking column at this point reached forty tho
arch. Nothing could surpass the determined valor with which they met the large army of the enemy, fully supplied and equipped, and the result reflected the highest credit on the officers and men engaged. Report of General R. E. Lee. On the 18th our forces occupied the position of the preceding day, except in the center, where our line was drawn in about two hundred yards. Our ranks were increased by the arrival of a number of troops who had not been engaged the day before, and, though strrival that day of two fresh divisions, amounting to about fifteen thousand men. As an instance of the condition of some of the troops that morning, I happen to recollect the returns of the First Corps, General Hooker's, made on the morning of the 18th, by which there were thirty-five hundred men reported present for duty. Four days after that, the returns of the same corps showed thirteen thousand five hundred. On the night of the 19th our forces crossed the Potomac, and some brigades of t
September 3rd (search for this): chapter 1.21
land crossing the Potomac evacuation of Martinsburg advance into Maryland large force of the enemy resistance at Boonesboro surrender of Harpers Ferry our forces reach Sharpsburg letter of the President to General Lee address of General Lee to the people position of our forces at Sharpsburg battle of Sharpsburg our strength forces withdrawn casualties. The enemy having retired to the protection of the fortifications around Washington and Alexandria, Lee's army marched, on September 3d, toward Leesburg. The armies of Generals McClellan and Pope had now been brought back to the point from which they set out on the campaign of the spring and summer. The objects of those campaigns had been frustrated, and the hostile designs against the coast of North Carolina and in western Virginia thwarted by the withdrawal of the main body of the forces from those regions. Northeastern Virginia was freed from the presence of the invader. His forces had withdrawn to the entrenchme
September 4th (search for this): chapter 1.21
ommunications and the safety of those engaged in the removal of our wounded and the captured property from the late battlefield. Having accomplished this result, it was proposed to move the army into western Maryland, establish our communication with Richmond through the Valley of the Shenandoah, and, by threatening Pennsylvania, induce the enemy to withdraw from our territory for the protection of his own. General D. H. Hill's division, being in advance, crossed the Potomac, between September 4th and 7th, at the ford near Leesburg, and encamped in the vicinity of Frederick. It had been supposed that this advance would lead to the evacuation of Martinsburg and Harpers Ferry, thus opening the line of communication through the Shenandoah Valley. This not having occurred, it became necessary to dislodge the garrisons from those positions before concentrating the army west of the mountains. For this purpose General Jackson marched very rapidly, crossed the Potomac near Williamsport
September 7th (search for this): chapter 1.21
and the safety of those engaged in the removal of our wounded and the captured property from the late battlefield. Having accomplished this result, it was proposed to move the army into western Maryland, establish our communication with Richmond through the Valley of the Shenandoah, and, by threatening Pennsylvania, induce the enemy to withdraw from our territory for the protection of his own. General D. H. Hill's division, being in advance, crossed the Potomac, between September 4th and 7th, at the ford near Leesburg, and encamped in the vicinity of Frederick. It had been supposed that this advance would lead to the evacuation of Martinsburg and Harpers Ferry, thus opening the line of communication through the Shenandoah Valley. This not having occurred, it became necessary to dislodge the garrisons from those positions before concentrating the army west of the mountains. For this purpose General Jackson marched very rapidly, crossed the Potomac near Williamsport on the 11th,
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