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Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
nd advanced southward, seizing the passes of the mountains as he progressed. In the latter part of the month he began to incline eastwardly from the mountains, moving in the direction of Warrenton, about which he finally concentrated, his cavalry being thrown forward beyond the Rappahannock in the direction of Culpeper Court House. On November 15th the enemy was in motion. The indications were that Fredericksburg was again to be occupied. Sumner's corps had marched in the direction of Falmouth, and gunboats and transports had entered Aquia Creek. McLaws's and Ransom's divisions were ordered to proceed to that city; on the 21st it became apparent that the whole army—under General Burnside, who had succeeded General McClellan—was concentrating on the north side of the Rappahannock. About November 26th Jackson was directed to advance toward Fredericksburg. As some of the enemy's gunboats had appeared in the river at Port Royal, and it was possible that an attempt might be mad
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
it was deemed inexpedient to assail it with less than our whole force, which had been reduced by the detachment led to Fredericksburg to relieve us from the danger that menaced our rear. It has been heretofore stated that General Longstreet had been sent with two divisions of Lee's army to cooperate with General French on the south side of the James River, in the capture of Suffolk, the occupation of which by the enemy interrupted our collection of supplies in the eastern counties of North Carolina and Virginia. When the advance of Hooker threatened General Lee's front, instructions were sent to General Longstreet to hasten his return to the army with the large force detached with him. These instructions were repeated with urgent insistence, yet his movements were so delayed that, though the battle of Chancellorsville did not occur until many days after he was expected to join, his force was absent when it occurred. Had he rejoined his command in due time, Lee need not have dimin
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
ntains as he progressed. In the latter part of the month he began to incline eastwardly from the mountains, moving in the direction of Warrenton, about which he finally concentrated, his cavalry being thrown forward beyond the Rappahannock in the direction of Culpeper Court House. On November 15th the enemy was in motion. The indications were that Fredericksburg was again to be occupied. Sumner's corps had marched in the direction of Falmouth, and gunboats and transports had entered Aquia Creek. McLaws's and Ransom's divisions were ordered to proceed to that city; on the 21st it became apparent that the whole army—under General Burnside, who had succeeded General McClellan—was concentrating on the north side of the Rappahannock. About November 26th Jackson was directed to advance toward Fredericksburg. As some of the enemy's gunboats had appeared in the river at Port Royal, and it was possible that an attempt might be made to cross in that vicinity. D. H. Hill's division
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
ar of the enemy's left. In the meantime General Hooker had so strengthened his position near Chancellorsville that it was deemed inexpedient to assail it with less than our whole force, which had been reduced by the detachment led to Fredericksburg to relieve us from the danger that menaced our rear. It has been heretofore stated that General Longstreet had been sent with two divisions of Lee's army to cooperate with General French on the south side of the James River, in the capture of Suffolk, the occupation of which by the enemy interrupted our collection of supplies in the eastern counties of North Carolina and Virginia. When the advance of Hooker threatened General Lee's front, instructions were sent to General Longstreet to hasten his return to the army with the large force detached with him. These instructions were repeated with urgent insistence, yet his movements were so delayed that, though the battle of Chancellorsville did not occur until many days after he was expect
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
ible to get the men up to the works. The enemy's fire was too hot for them. Report of Committee on the Conduct of the War, Part I, p. 656. After the battle of Fredericksburg the Army of Northern Virginia remained encamped on the south side of the Rappahannock until the latter part of April, 1863. The Federal army occupied the north side of the river opposite Fredericksburg, extending to the Potomac. Two brigades of Anderson's division—those of Mahone and Posey—were stationed near United States Mine or Bank Mill Ford. The cavalry was distributed on both flanks—Fitzhugh Lee's brigade picketing the Rappahannock above the mouth of the Rapidan and W. H. F. Lee's near Port Royal. General Longstreet, with two divisions of his corps, was detached for service south of James River in February, and did not rejoin the army until after the battle of Chancellorsville. Excepting a cavalry engagement near Kelly's Ford, on March 17th, nothing of interest transpired during this period of inac<
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
crossing the ** Rapidan, converged near Chancellorsville, whence several roads led to the rear of ench himself. His rear guard, as he left Chancellorsville, was attacked by cavalry, but, being vigotil they arrived within about one mile of Chancellorsville. Here the enemy had assumed a position o and formed in line of battle in front of Chancellorsville at right angles to the plank road, extendine of works near the central position at Chancellorsville. It was now dark, and General Jackson orlegraph road, or to come upon our rear at Chancellorsville by the plank road. He began to advance o and Anderson being directed to return to Chancellorsville, they reached their destination during tht against an attack from the direction of Chancellorsville nor did he move southward so as to put hi joined General Hooker, who now had about Chancellorsville ninety-one thousand men—six corps except t Fredericksburg, and had advanced toward Chancellorsville, thus threatening the Confederate rear. [11 more...]
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
's artillery was posted. Three times were these works carried, and as often were the brave assailants compelled to abandon them—twice by the retirement of the troops on their left, who fell back after a gallant struggle with superior numbers, and once by a movement of the enemy on their right caused by the advance of General Anderson. The left, being reenforced, finally succeeded in driving back the enemy, and the artillery under Lieutenant Colonels Carter and Jones, Operations in Northern Virginia being thrown forward to occupy favorable positions secured by the advance of the infantry, began to play with great precision and effect. Anderson, in the meantime, pressed gallantly forward directly upon Chancellorsville, his right resting upon the plank road and his left extending around the furnace, while McLaws made a strong demonstration to the right of the road. As the troops advancing upon the enemy's front and right converged upon his central position, Anderson effected a j
Telegraph (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
the small force at the foot of Marye's Hill, overpowered by more than ten times their numbers, was captured after an heroic resistance and the hill carried. The success of the enemy enabled him to threaten our communications by moving down the Telegraph road, or to come upon our rear at Chancellorsville by the plank road. He began to advance on the plank road, his progress being gallantly disputed by the brigade of General Wilcox, who fell back slowly until he reached Salem Church on the plan in large force. It being quite dark, General Wilcox deemed it imprudent to push the attack with his small numbers, and retired to his original position, the enemy making no attempt to follow. The next morning General Early advanced along the Telegraph road, and recaptured Marye's and the adjacent hills without difficulty, thus gaining the rear of the enemy's left. In the meantime General Hooker had so strengthened his position near Chancellorsville that it was deemed inexpedient to assail i
Mine (Ethiopia) (search for this): chapter 1.23
ock, covering the Bank Mill Ford, where he communicated with the north bank of the river by a pontoon bridge. His right stretched westward along the Germania Ford road more than two miles. Darkness was approaching before the strength and extent of his line could be ascertained; as the nature of the country rendered it hazardous to attack by night, our troops were halted and formed in line of battle in front of Chancellorsville at right angles to the plank road, extending on the right to the Mine road, and to the left in the direction of the Furnace. It was evident that a direct attack by us would be attended with great difficulty and loss, in view of the strength of his position and his superiority of numbers. It was therefore resolved to endeavor to turn his right flank and gain his rear, leaving a force in front to hold him in check and conceal the movement. The execution of this plan was entrusted to Lieutenant General Jackson with his three divisions. The commands of Genera
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.23
sion was stationed near that place, and the rest of Jackson's corps so disposed as to support Hill or Longstreet, and Hood extending to the right. A. P. Hill, of Jackson's corps, was posted between Hood's right and Hamiltwood. Early and Taliaferro's divisions constituted Jackson's second line, D. H. Hill's division his reserve. oad, his numerous batteries opening with vigor upon Jackson's line. Eliciting no response, his infantry movedtle to the approaching column. Early's division of Jackson's corps and Barksdale's brigade of McLaws's divisioe. As soon as the sound of cannon gave notice of Jackson's attack on the enemy's right, the troops in front central position, Anderson effected a junction with Jackson's corps, and the whole line pressed irresistibly. uch to insure its success. The flank movement of Jackson's wing was attended with extraordinary success. Onerals Lee and Stuart (the latter then in command of Jackson's wing) joined elbows; and after most heroic and de
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