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— Thompson (search for this): chapter 1.36
t in position and intelligence, was accordingly appointed to visit Canada with a view to negotiation with such persons in the North as might be relied upon to aid the attainment of peace. The commission was designed to facilitate such preliminary conditions as might lead to formal negotiations between the two governments, and they were expected to make judicious use of any political opportunity that might be presented. The commissioners—Messrs. Clay of Alabama, Holcombe of Virginia, and Thompson of Mississippi—established themselves at Niagara Falls in July, and on the 12th commenced a correspondence with Horace Greeley of New York. Through him they sought a safe conduct to Washington. Lincoln at first appeared to favor an interview, but finally refused on the ground that the commissioners were not authorized to treat for peace. His final announcement to them was the following: Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., July 18, 1864. To whom it may concern: Any proposition
Montgomery County (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
arers thereof shall have safe conduct both ways. Abraham Lincoln. This movement, like all others which had preceded it, was a failure. On December 30, 1864, I received a request from Francis P. Blair, a distinguished citizen of Montgomery County, Maryland, for permission to visit Richmond for certain personal objects. This was conceded to him. On January 12, 1865, he visited me, and the following statement of our interview was immediately afterward prepared: Richmond, Virginia, January 12, 1865. Memorandum of a confidential conversation held this day with F. P. Blair of Montgomery County, Maryland. Mr. Blair stated that, not receiving an answer to his application for permission to visit Richmond, which had been sent from the headquarters of General Grant's army, he returned to Washington and there received the reply which had been made to his application, but by some means had been withheld from him and been forwarded after having been opened; that he had originall
Manchester (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
nted to visit Canada with a view to negotiation with such persons in the North as might be relied upon to aid the attainment of peace. The commission was designed to facilitate such preliminary conditions as might lead to formal negotiations between the two governments, and they were expected to make judicious use of any political opportunity that might be presented. The commissioners—Messrs. Clay of Alabama, Holcombe of Virginia, and Thompson of Mississippi—established themselves at Niagara Falls in July, and on the 12th commenced a correspondence with Horace Greeley of New York. Through him they sought a safe conduct to Washington. Lincoln at first appeared to favor an interview, but finally refused on the ground that the commissioners were not authorized to treat for peace. His final announcement to them was the following: Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., July 18, 1864. To whom it may concern: Any proposition which embraces the restoration of peace, the integr
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
ntgomery County, Maryland, for permission to visit Richmond for certain personal objects. This was conceded to him. On January 12, 1865, he visited me, and the following statement of our interview was immediately afterward prepared: Richmond, Virginia, January 12, 1865. Memorandum of a confidential conversation held this day with F. P. Blair of Montgomery County, Maryland. Mr. Blair stated that, not receiving an answer to his application for permission to visit Richmond, which had bee The foregoing memorandum of conversation was this day read to Mr. Blair, and altered in so far as he desired, in any respect, to change the expressions employed. Jefferson Davis. The following letter was given by me to Blair: Richmond, Virginia, January 12, 1865. F. P. Blair, Esq. Sir: I have deemed it proper and probably desirable to you to give you in this form the substance of remarks made by me to be repeated by you to President Lincoln, etc., etc. I have no disposition
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
ere not authorized to treat for peace. His final announcement to them was the following: Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., July 18, 1864. To whom it may concern: Any proposition which embraces the restoration of peace, the integrity o compliance with the letter of Mr. Lincoln, of which the foregoing is a copy, you are hereby requested to proceed to Washington City for conference with him upon the subject to which it relates. . . . This draft of a commission was, upon perusal. In conformity with the letter of Mr. Lincoln, of which the foregoing is a copy, you are requested to proceed to Washington City for an informal conference with him upon the issues involved in the existing war, and for the purpose of securing pens were finally waived. The letter of Lincoln having expressed a willingness to receive any agent I might send to Washington city, a commission was appointed to go there; it was not allowed to proceed further, however, than Hampton Roads, where L
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
at the experiment should be tried. The enemy refused to let him pass through their lines or to hold any conference with him. He was stopped before he reached Fortress Monroe. If we would break up our government, dissolve the Confederacy, disband our armies, emancipate our slaves, take an oath of allegiance binding ourselves to e had finished, I inquired as to his main proposition, the cessation of hostilities and the union of the military forces for the common purpose of maintaining the Monroe doctrine—how that object was to be reached. He said that both the political parties of the United States asserted the Monroe doctrine as a cardinal point of their the bitter waters, and another bond than that of former memories and interests. This was supposed to be contained in the proposed common effort to maintain the Monroe doctrine on the American Continent. It was evident that he counted on the disintegration of the Confederate States if the war continued, and that in any event he
Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
it being a response to my note to Blair of the 12th, he said it had been a fortunate thing that I gave him that note, as it had created greater confidence in Lincoln regarding his efforts at Richmond. Further reflection, he said, had modified the views he formerly presented to me, and that he wanted to have my attention for a different mode of procedure. He had, as he told Lincoln, held friendly relations with me for many years; they began as far back as when I was a schoolboy at Lexington, Kentucky, and he a resident of that place. In later years we had belonged to the same political party, and our views had generally coincided. There was much, therefore, to facilitate our conference. He then unfolded to me the embarrassment of Lincoln on account of the extreme men in Congress and elsewhere who wished to drive him into harsher measures than he was inclined to adopt, whence it would not be feasible for him to enter into any arrangement with us by the use of political agencies;
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
assionately construe the government of the United States in its declarations to us. Several effoy to our own states, the government of the United States proposed to pardon us, and not to deprive agements between European powers and the Confederate States. This point, when referred to a second ctions were made to this commission by the United States officials, because it authorized the commi pains and penalties under the laws of the United States might rely upon a very liberal use of the ly execute the office of President of the United States, and will, to the best of my ability, pres This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof, rate, and supreme as the government of the United States in its delegated powers. One of these resss; that power is neither delegated to the United States by the Constitution nor prohibited by it t once disapproved by the government of the United States, and Sherman therefore wrote to Johnston: [31 more...]
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
whom they may have granted the same. . . . Under these impressions, and declaring that the rights aforesaid can not be abridged or violated . . . we, the said delegates, in the name and in behalf of the people of the State of New York, do, by these presents, assent to and ratify the said Constitution. With this and other conditions stated in the resolution of ratification, it was accepted and approved by the other states, and New York became a member of the Union. The resolution of Rhode Island asserts the same reservation in regard to the reassumption of powers. It is unnecessary to examine here whether this reserved power exists in the states respectively or in the people; when the Confederate States seceded, it was done by the people, acting through, or in conjunction with, the state, and by that power which is expressly reserved to them in the Constitution of the United States. When Lincoln, therefore, issued his proclamation calling for seventy-five thousand men to subj
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
at every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by the said Constitution clearly delegated to the Congress of the United States, or to the departments of the Government thereof, remains to the people of the several States, or to their respective State governments, to whom they may have granted the same. . . . Under these impressions, and declaring that the rights aforesaid can not be abridged or violated . . . we, the said delegates, in the name and in behalf of the people of the State of New York, do, by these presents, assent to and ratify the said Constitution. With this and other conditions stated in the resolution of ratification, it was accepted and approved by the other states, and New York became a member of the Union. The resolution of Rhode Island asserts the same reservation in regard to the reassumption of powers. It is unnecessary to examine here whether this reserved power exists in the states respectively or in the people; when the Confederate States sece
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