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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. Search the whole document.

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James F. Jacques (search for this): chapter 1.36
jugation the object of the government of the United States the only terms of peace offered to us rejection of all proposals efforts of the enemy appearance of Jacques and Gilmore at Richmond proposals answer commissioners sent to Canada the object proceedings note of President Lincoln permission to visit Richmond grantednce of his ends. The next movement relating to the accommodation of differences occurred in July, 1864, and consisted in the appearance at Richmond of Colonel James F. Jacques of the Seventy-eighth Illinois Infantry, and James R. Gilmore of Massachusetts, soliciting an interview with me. They stated that they had no official ch to Colonel Ould, commissioner for the exchange of prisoners. The Secretary of State, Benjamin, to whom they were conducted, accompanied them to my office. Colonel Jacques expressed the ardent desire he felt, in common with the men of their army, for a restoration of peace, using such emphatic terms as that the men would go home
R. M. T. Hunter (search for this): chapter 1.36
oln. I determined to send, as commissioners or agents for the informal conference, Messrs. Alexander H. Stephens, R. M. T. Hunter and John A. Campbell. A letter of commission or certificate of appointment for each was prepared by the Secretarye Confederate Congress; all those of the class who, of old, fled to the cave of Adullam, gathered themselves unto him. Hunter, in a published article on the peace commission, referring to Blair's visit to Richmond, says: He saw many old friends and have power to enforce this amendment by appropriate legislation. Very respectfully, etc., Alexander H. Stephens, R. M. T. Hunter, John A. Campbell. Thus closed the conference, and all negotiations with the government of the United States for the establishment of peace. Says Judge Campbell, in his memoranda: In conclusion, Mr. Hunter summed up what seemed to be the result of the interview: that there could be no arrangements by treaty between the Confederate States and the United St
John A. Campbell (search for this): chapter 1.36
r to him response of President Lincoln three persons sent by me to an informal conference their report remarks of Judge Campbell oath of President Lincoln the provision of the Constitution and his proclamation compared reserved powers spoken o to send, as commissioners or agents for the informal conference, Messrs. Alexander H. Stephens, R. M. T. Hunter and John A. Campbell. A letter of commission or certificate of appointment for each was prepared by the Secretary of State in the follnforce this amendment by appropriate legislation. Very respectfully, etc., Alexander H. Stephens, R. M. T. Hunter, John A. Campbell. Thus closed the conference, and all negotiations with the government of the United States for the establishment of peace. Says Judge Campbell, in his memoranda: In conclusion, Mr. Hunter summed up what seemed to be the result of the interview: that there could be no arrangements by treaty between the Confederate States and the United States, or any agree
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1.36
d open the way to official negotiations, etc. They had crossed our lines through a letter of General Grant to Colonel Ould, commissioner for the exchange of prisoners. The Secretary of State, Benjas application for permission to visit Richmond, which had been sent from the headquarters of General Grant's army, he returned to Washington and there received the reply which had been made to his ap done without the intervention of the politicians. He therefore suggested that Generals Lee and Grant might enter into an arrangement by which hostilities would be suspended, and a way paved for theulate, were only those of subjugation. When General Buckner, on February 16, 1862, asked of General Grant to appoint commissioners to agree upon terms of capitulation, he replied: No terms, exce surrender, can be accepted. When General Lee asked the same question, on April 9, 1865, General Grant replied: The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying
— Holcombe (search for this): chapter 1.36
n of three persons, eminent in position and intelligence, was accordingly appointed to visit Canada with a view to negotiation with such persons in the North as might be relied upon to aid the attainment of peace. The commission was designed to facilitate such preliminary conditions as might lead to formal negotiations between the two governments, and they were expected to make judicious use of any political opportunity that might be presented. The commissioners—Messrs. Clay of Alabama, Holcombe of Virginia, and Thompson of Mississippi—established themselves at Niagara Falls in July, and on the 12th commenced a correspondence with Horace Greeley of New York. Through him they sought a safe conduct to Washington. Lincoln at first appeared to favor an interview, but finally refused on the ground that the commissioners were not authorized to treat for peace. His final announcement to them was the following: Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., July 18, 1864. To whom it may c
hen Blair returned and gave me this letter of Lincoln of January 18th, it being a response to my norent mode of procedure. He had, as he told Lincoln, held friendly relations with me for many yea He then unfolded to me the embarrassment of Lincoln on account of the extreme men in Congress andemained only for me to act upon the letter of Lincoln. I determined to send, as commissioners or form: In compliance with the letter of Mr. Lincoln, of which the foregoing is a copy, you are e to the two countries; whereas the letter of Lincoln, which was their passport, spoke of securing ections were finally waived. The letter of Lincoln having expressed a willingness to receive anyrs; a more important inquiry, however, is: If Lincoln previously had determined to hear no propositen without functions. I think the views of Lincoln had changed after he wrote the letter to Blaiis efforts successfully to prosecute the war, Lincoln may be naturally supposed thence to have reac[5 more...]
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 1.36
with him my letter to him response of President Lincoln three persons sent by me to an informalyears held friendly relations with myself. Mr. Lincoln stopped him, though he afterward gave him pand, from the circumstances, concluded that Mr. Lincoln avoided the interview, and therefore came nredentials but without such instructions from Lincoln as enabled him to speak for him. His views, tnegotiation, and my inability to see—unless Mr. Lincoln's course in that regard should be changed— e first step. He expressed the belief that Mr. Lincoln would now receive commissioners, but subsequrn to Washington to explain his project to Mr. Lincoln, and notify me, if his hope proved well foutering into negotiations. He affirmed that Mr. Lincoln did not sympathize with the radical men whoent to perform it. On March 4, 1861, President Lincoln appeared on the western portico of the Crein. Thus the Constitution itself nullified Lincoln's proclamation, and made it of no force whate[21 more...]<
J. E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.36
had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms, they will hasten that most desirable event, save thoussands of human lives and hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed. When General Sherman made an agreement with General Johnston for formal disbandment of the army of the latter, it was at once disapproved by the government of the United States, and Sherman therefore wrote to Johnston: I demand the surrender of your army on the same terms as were given to General Johnston: I demand the surrender of your army on the same terms as were given to General Lee at Appomattox, on April 9th, purely and simply. It remains to be stated that the government which spurned all these proposals for peace, and gave no terms but unconditional and immediate surrender, was instituted and organized for the purposes and objects expressed in the following extract, and for no others: We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general
William H. Seward (search for this): chapter 1.36
appointed to go there; it was not allowed to proceed further, however, than Hampton Roads, where Lincoln, accompanied by Seward, met the commissioners. Seward craftily proposed that the conference should be confidential, and the commissioners regarSeward craftily proposed that the conference should be confidential, and the commissioners regarded this so binding on them as to prevent them from including in their report the discussion which occurred. This enabled Seward to give his own version of it in a dispatch to the United States Minister to the French government, which was calculatedSeward to give his own version of it in a dispatch to the United States Minister to the French government, which was calculated to create distrust of, if not hostility to, the Confederacy on the part of the power in Europe most effectively favoring our recognition. Why Lincoln changed his purpose and, instead of receiving the commissioners at Washington, met them at Hamptok place on the 30th ult., on board of a steamer anchored in Hampton Roads, where we met President Lincoln and the Hon. Mr. Seward, Secretary of State of the United States. It continued for several hours, and was both full and explicit. We learned
S. B. Buckner (search for this): chapter 1.36
or of either of them, in his negotiations would have exposed the groundlessness of his fiction. But the Constitution required him to recognize each of them, for they had simply exercised a power which it expressly reserved for their exercise. Thus it is seen who violated the Constitution, and upon whom rests the responsibility of the war. It has been stated above that the conditions offered to our soldiers whenever they proposed to capitulate, were only those of subjugation. When General Buckner, on February 16, 1862, asked of General Grant to appoint commissioners to agree upon terms of capitulation, he replied: No terms, except unconditional and immediate surrender, can be accepted. When General Lee asked the same question, on April 9, 1865, General Grant replied: The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms, they will hasten that most desirable event, save thoussands of human lives and hundreds of millions of pro
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