hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 1,340 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 340 6 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 275 3 Browse Search
James Longstreet 260 4 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 244 0 Browse Search
T. J. Jackson 240 4 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 225 3 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 219 1 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 180 0 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 168 14 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. Search the whole document.

Found 354 total hits in 68 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
February 5th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 1.36
noted this serious inclining of many to thoughts of peace, scarcely admits of a doubt; if he believed the Congress to be infected by a cabal undermining the executive in his efforts successfully to prosecute the war, Lincoln may be naturally supposed thence to have reached the conclusion that he should accept nothing but an unconditional surrender, and that he should not allow a commission from the Confederacy to visit the United States capital. The report of the commissioners, dated February 5, 1865, was as follows: To the President of the Confederate States: Sir: Under your letter of appointment of the 28th ult. we proceeded to seek an informal conference with Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, upon the subject mentioned in the letter. The conference was granted and took place on the 30th ult., on board of a steamer anchored in Hampton Roads, where we met President Lincoln and the Hon. Mr. Seward, Secretary of State of the United States. It continued for
eek an informal conference with Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, upon the subject mentioned in the letter. The conference was granted and took place on the 30th ult., on board of a steamer anchored in Hampton Roads, where we met President Lincoln and the Hon. Mr. Seward, Secretary of State of the United States. It continued for several hours, and was both full and explicit. We learned from them that the message of President Lincoln to the Congress of the United States, in December last, explains clearly and distinctly his sentiments as to the terms, conditions, and method of proceeding by which peace can be secured to the people, and we were not informed that they would be modified or altered to obtain that end. We understood from him that no terms or proposals of any treaty, or agreement looking to an ultimate settlement, would be entertained or made by him with the authorities of the Confederate States, because that would be a recognition of their existence as a s
eive a commission if the United States Government shall choose to send one. That, notwithstanding the rejection of our former offers, I would, if you could promise that a commissioner, minister, or other agent would be received, appoint one immediately, and renew the effort to enter into conference with a view to secure peace to the two countries. Yours, etc., Jefferson Davis. Washington, January 18, 1865. F. P. Blair, Esq. Sir: You having shown me Mr. Davis's letter to you of the 12th instant, you may say to him that I have constantly been, am now, and shall continue ready to receive any agent whom he or any other influential person now resisting the national authority may informally send to me with the view of securing peace to the people of our one common country. Yours, etc., A. Lincoln. When Blair returned and gave me this letter of Lincoln of January 18th, it being a response to my note to Blair of the 12th, he said it had been a fortunate thing that I gave him th
United States over all places within the States of the Confederacy; that whatever consequences may follow from the reestablishment of that authority must be accepted; but that individuals subject to pains and penalties under the laws of the United States might rely upon a very liberal use of the power confided to him to remit those pains and penalties if peace be restored. During the conference, the proposed amendment to the Constitution of the United States adopted by Congress on the 31st ultimo was brought to our notice. This amendment provides that neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except for crime, should exist within the United States, or any place within their jurisdiction, and that Congress should have power to enforce this amendment by appropriate legislation. Very respectfully, etc., Alexander H. Stephens, R. M. T. Hunter, John A. Campbell. Thus closed the conference, and all negotiations with the government of the United States for the establishment of
February 16th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.36
, in his negotiations would have exposed the groundlessness of his fiction. But the Constitution required him to recognize each of them, for they had simply exercised a power which it expressly reserved for their exercise. Thus it is seen who violated the Constitution, and upon whom rests the responsibility of the war. It has been stated above that the conditions offered to our soldiers whenever they proposed to capitulate, were only those of subjugation. When General Buckner, on February 16, 1862, asked of General Grant to appoint commissioners to agree upon terms of capitulation, he replied: No terms, except unconditional and immediate surrender, can be accepted. When General Lee asked the same question, on April 9, 1865, General Grant replied: The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms, they will hasten that most desirable event, save thoussands of human lives and hundreds of millions of property not yet destroy
July 26th, 1788 AD (search for this): chapter 1.36
delegated to the United States by the Constitution. It is absurd to ask if the power of secession in a state is delegated to the United States by the Constitution, or prohibited by it to the states. No trace of the delegation or prohibition of this power is to be found in the Constitution. It is, therefore, as the Constitution says, reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. The convention of the state of New York, which ratified the Constitution of the United States on July 26, 1788, in its resolution of ratification said: We do declare and make known . . . that the powers of Government may be reassumed by the people, whensoever, it shall become necessary to their happiness; that every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by the said Constitution clearly delegated to the Congress of the United States, or to the departments of the Government thereof, remains to the people of the several States, or to their respective State governments, to whom they may ha
December 30th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.36
egrity of the whole union, and the abandonment of slavery, and which comes by and with an authority that can control the armies now at war against the United States, will be received and considered by the Executive Government of the United States, and will be met by liberal terms on other substantial and collateral points, and the bearer or bearers thereof shall have safe conduct both ways. Abraham Lincoln. This movement, like all others which had preceded it, was a failure. On December 30, 1864, I received a request from Francis P. Blair, a distinguished citizen of Montgomery County, Maryland, for permission to visit Richmond for certain personal objects. This was conceded to him. On January 12, 1865, he visited me, and the following statement of our interview was immediately afterward prepared: Richmond, Virginia, January 12, 1865. Memorandum of a confidential conversation held this day with F. P. Blair of Montgomery County, Maryland. Mr. Blair stated that, not re
January 12th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 1.36
. Blair, a distinguished citizen of Montgomery County, Maryland, for permission to visit Richmond for certain personal objects. This was conceded to him. On January 12, 1865, he visited me, and the following statement of our interview was immediately afterward prepared: Richmond, Virginia, January 12, 1865. Memorandum of aJanuary 12, 1865. Memorandum of a confidential conversation held this day with F. P. Blair of Montgomery County, Maryland. Mr. Blair stated that, not receiving an answer to his application for permission to visit Richmond, which had been sent from the headquarters of General Grant's army, he returned to Washington and there received the reply which had been ma desired, in any respect, to change the expressions employed. Jefferson Davis. The following letter was given by me to Blair: Richmond, Virginia, January 12, 1865. F. P. Blair, Esq. Sir: I have deemed it proper and probably desirable to you to give you in this form the substance of remarks made by me to be repeated
t Canada with a view to negotiation with such persons in the North as might be relied upon to aid the attainment of peace. The commission was designed to facilitate such preliminary conditions as might lead to formal negotiations between the two governments, and they were expected to make judicious use of any political opportunity that might be presented. The commissioners—Messrs. Clay of Alabama, Holcombe of Virginia, and Thompson of Mississippi—established themselves at Niagara Falls in July, and on the 12th commenced a correspondence with Horace Greeley of New York. Through him they sought a safe conduct to Washington. Lincoln at first appeared to favor an interview, but finally refused on the ground that the commissioners were not authorized to treat for peace. His final announcement to them was the following: Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., July 18, 1864. To whom it may concern: Any proposition which embraces the restoration of peace, the integrity of the wh
April 9th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 1.36
who violated the Constitution, and upon whom rests the responsibility of the war. It has been stated above that the conditions offered to our soldiers whenever they proposed to capitulate, were only those of subjugation. When General Buckner, on February 16, 1862, asked of General Grant to appoint commissioners to agree upon terms of capitulation, he replied: No terms, except unconditional and immediate surrender, can be accepted. When General Lee asked the same question, on April 9, 1865, General Grant replied: The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms, they will hasten that most desirable event, save thoussands of human lives and hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed. When General Sherman made an agreement with General Johnston for formal disbandment of the army of the latter, it was at once disapproved by the government of the United States, and Sherman therefore wrote to Johnston: I demand
1 2 3 4 5 6 7