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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. Search the whole document.

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A. G. Curtin (search for this): chapter 1.7
New York on Sunday night telegraphed to Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and other cities, as follows: Orders from Washington render it necessary to send to that city all the available militia force. What can you do? E. D. Morgan. Governor Curtin of Pennsylvania issued the following order: (General order, no. 23.) headquarters of Pennsylvania militia, Harrisburg, May 26, 1862. On pressing requisition of the President of the United States in the present emergency, it is ordations within their respective divisions or under their control, together with all persons willing to join their commands, and proceed forthwith to the city of Washington, or such other points as may be designated by future orders. By order: A. G. Curtin, Governor and Commander-in-Chief. The governor of Massachusetts issued the following proclamation: Men of Massachusetts! The wily and barbarous horde of traitors to the people, to the Government, to our country, and to liberty,
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 1.7
e it would have been quite possible to cut our line of communication with the more Southern states on which we chiefly depended for supplies and for reenforcements. It is hardly just to treat the failure to fulfill the assurance given by President Lincoln about reenforcements as deceptive promises, for, as will be seen, the operations in the Valley by General Jackson, who there exhibited a rapidity of movement equal to the unyielding tenacity which had in the first great battle won for him temy operates actively against General Banks, you will not be able to count upon much assistance from him, but may have even to release him. Reports received this morning are that Banks is fighting with Ewell, eight miles from Harper's Ferry. Abraham Lincoln. When the panic thus indicated in the headquarters of the enemy had disseminated itself through the military and social ramifications of Northern society, the excitement was tumultuous. Meanwhile General Jackson, little conceiving the a
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1.7
been better founded, would have justified the refusal to diminish the force held for the protection of their capital. Indeed, our cavalry, in observation near Fredericksburg, reported that on the 24th McDowell's troops started southward, but General Stuart found that night that they were returning. This indicated that the anticipated junction was not to be made, and of this the Prince de Joinville writes: It needed only an effort of the will: the two armies were united, and the possession anding ridge, with a rivulet and open ground in front, woods on both flanks, and the road to Port Republic intersecting his line. Trimble's brigade was posted on the right, the batteries of Courtney, Lusk, Brockenbrough, and Rains in the center, Stuart's brigade on the left, and Elzey's in rear of the center. Both wings were in the woods. About ten o'clock the enemy posted his artillery opposite our batteries, and a fire was kept up for several hours, with great spirit on both sides. Meantim
l of General McDowell, Washington, December 10, 1862. Let us first inquire what was the size of this army so crippled for want of reenforcement, and then what the strength of that to which it was opposed. On April 30, 1862, the official report of McClellan's army gives the aggregate present for duty as 112,392; Report on the Conduct of the War, Part I, p. 322. that of June 20th —omitting the army corps of General Dix, then, as previously, stationed at Fortress Monroe, and including General McCall's division, which had recently joined, the strength of which was reported to be 9,514— gives the aggregate present for duty as 105,825, and the total, present and absent, as 156,838. Ibid., p. 337. Two statements of the strength of our army under General J. E. Johnston during the month of May—in which General McClellan testified that he was greatly in need of McDowell's corps—give the following results: first, the official return, May 21, 1862, total effective of all arms, 53,688;
ken in the pursuit. General Banks in his report says, There never were more grateful hearts in the same number of men, than when, at mid-day on the 26th, we stood on the opposite shore. When the news of the attack on Front Royal, on May 23d, reached General Geary, charged with the protection of the Manassas Gap Railroad, he immediately moved to Manassas Junction. At the same time, his troops, hearing the most extravagant stories, burned their tents and destroyed a quantity of arms. General Duryea, at Catlett's Station, becoming alarmed on hearing of the withdrawal of Geary, took his three New York regiments, leaving a Pennsylvania one behind, hastened back to Centreville, and telegraphed to Washington for aid. He left a large quantity of army stores. The alarm spread to Washington, and the Secretary of War, Stanton, issued a call to the governors of the loyal states for militia to defend that city. The following is the dispatch sent to the governor of Massachusetts: Wa
General Jackson, with whose force that of General Ewell had united, moved with such rapidity as to surprise the enemy, and Ewell, who was in advance, captured most of the troops at Front Royal, andd this morning are that Banks is fighting with Ewell, eight miles from Harper's Ferry. Abraham Linhe morning. This movement was assigned to General Ewell, General Jackson personally giving his att more serious attack. Ashby sent a message to Ewell, informing him that cavalry supported by infane enemy, who were under cover of a fence. General Ewell in the meantime had arrived, and, seeing te opposing force back to its former position. Ewell, finding no attack on his left was designed byand render it necessary to withdraw our guns. Ewell was hurrying his men over the bridge, and therdid the best he could with what he had, called Ewell to his aid, left him to hold Banks in check, an returned toward Harrisonburg, having ordered Ewell to join him for an attack on Banks, who in the[9 more...]
us to preserve was said to require a wagon-train twelve miles long. This, under the care of a regiment, was sent forward in advance of the army, which promptly retired up the Valley. On his retreat, General Jackson received information confirmatory of the report of the movements of the enemy, and of the defeat of a small force he had left at Front Royal in charge of some prisoners and captured stores—the latter, however, the garrison before retreating had destroyed. Strasburg being General Jaskson's objective point, he had farther to march to reach that position than either of the columns operating against him. The rapidity of movement which marked General Jackson's operations had given to his command the appellation of foot cavalry; never had they more need to show themselves entitled to the name of Stonewall. On the night of May 31st, by a forced march, General Jackson arrived with the head of his column at Strasburg, and learned that General Fremont's advance was in the imm
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 1.7
im. The rapidity of movement which marked General Jackson's operations had given to his command thethe night of May 31st, by a forced march, General Jackson arrived with the head of his column at St purpose of reaching New Market in advance of Jackson. On the morning of the 5th Jackson reached Hements of the enemy. The main body of General Jackson's command had now reached Port Republic, movement to renew the action of the 8th, General Jackson determined to attack him on the 9th. Accf the road, his thin line was so pressed that Jackson ordered Hayes to stop the enemy's rush. Thisial means of information: In three months Jackson had marched six hundred miles, fought four pi upon his own part comparatively small. Stonewall Jackson, military biography by John Esten Cooke,e important, and the motives which influenced Jackson present him in a grander light than any militto cooperate in the attack upon Richmond, General Jackson, with his small force of about three thou[16 more...]
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.7
es the aggregate present for duty as 112,392; Report on the Conduct of the War, Part I, p. 322. that of June 20th —omitting the army corps of General Dix, then, as previously, stationed at Fortress Monroe, and including General McCall's division, which had recently joined, the strength of which was reported to be 9,514— gives the aggregate present for duty as 105,825, and the total, present and absent, as 156,838. Ibid., p. 337. Two statements of the strength of our army under General J. E. Johnston during the month of May—in which General McClellan testified that he was greatly in need of McDowell's corps—give the following results: first, the official return, May 21, 1862, total effective of all arms, 53,688; subsequently, five brigades were added, and the effective strength of the army under General Johnston on May 31, 1862, was 62,696. Four Years with General Lee, by Walter H. Taylor, p. 50. I now proceed to inquire what caused the panic at Washington. On May 23d, G
rapid movements Repulses Fremont advance of Shields fall of Ashby battle of Port Republic resuchasing Fremont, for it was reported that General Shields was at Front Royal with troops of a diffeeen Front Royal and Port Republic, to prevent Shields from crossing the Shenandoah to join Fremont.t a junction, the bridge over the river, near Shields' position, had been destroyed. As the advance of General Shields approached on the 8th, the brigades of Taliaferro and Winder were ordered tothey disappeared in a wood. This attack of Shields had scarcely been repulsed when Ewell became known as the battle of Cross Keys. As General Shields made no movement to renew the action of twas done, under orders to concentrate against Shields. Meanwhile the enemy had taken position abroach for a considerable distance in front of Shields' position. Our guns were brought forward, anrved their organization to the last; and, had Shields himself, with his whole command, been on the [5 more...]
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