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Shenandoah (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
and fought with such desperation as to impress the enemy with the idea that he had a large army; therefore, the detachments, which had already started for Manassas, were recalled, and additional forces were also sent into the Valley. Nor was this all. McDowell's corps, under orders to join Mc-Clellan, was detained for the defense of the Federal capital. Jackson's bold strategy had effected the object for which his movement was designed, and he slowly retreated to the south bank of the Shenandoah, where he remained undisturbed by the enemy, and had time to recruit his forces, which, by April 28th, amounted to six or seven thousand men. General Banks had advanced and occupied Harrisonburg, about fifteen miles from Jackson's position. Fremont, with a force estimated at fifteen thousand men, was reported to be preparing to join Bank's command. The alarm at Washington had caused McDowell's corps to be withdrawn from the upper Rappahannock to Fredericksburg. Jackson, anxious to tak
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
y night telegraphed to Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and other cities, as follows: Orders from Washington render it necessary to send to that city all the available militia force. What can you do? E. D. Morgan. Governor Curtin of Pennsylvania issued the following order: (General order, no. 23.) headquarters of Pennsylvania militia, Harrisburg, May 26, 1862. On pressing requisition of the President of the United States in the present emergency, it is ordered that the sevePennsylvania militia, Harrisburg, May 26, 1862. On pressing requisition of the President of the United States in the present emergency, it is ordered that the several major-generals, brigadier-generals, and colonels of regiments throughout the Commonwealth muster without delay all military organizations within their respective divisions or under their control, together with all persons willing to join their commands, and proceed forthwith to the city of Washington, or such other points as may be designated by future orders. By order: A. G. Curtin, Governor and Commander-in-Chief. The governor of Massachusetts issued the following proclamation:
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
ns. Rifle pits had been made in front of the fort, and obstructions had been placed in the river by driving piles and sinking some vessels. The crew of the Virginia, after her destruction, had been sent to this fort, which was then in charge of Commander Farrand, Confederate States Navy. On April 15th the enemy's fleet of five ships of war, among the number their much-vaunted Monitor, took position and opened fire upon the fort between seven and eight o'clock. Our small vessel, the Patrick Henry, was lying above the obstruction, and cooperated with the fort in its defense—the Monitor and the ironclad Galena steamed up to about six hundred yard's distance; the others, wooden vessels were kept at long range. The armor of the flagship Galena was badly injured, and many of the crew killed or wounded. The Monitor was struck repeatedly, but the shot only bent her plates. At about eleven o'clock the fleet abandoned the attack, returning discomfited whence they came. The commander
Shenandoah Valley (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
forces, and retreated down the Valley. The rapid movements of Jackson, the eaglelike swoop with which he had descended upon each army of the enemy, and the terror which his name had come to inspire, created a great alarm at Washington, where it was believed he must have an immense army, and that he was about to come down like an avalanche upon the capital. Milroy, Banks, Fremont, and Shields were all moved in that direction, and peace again reigned in the patriotic and once happy Valley of the Shenandoah. The material results of this very remarkable campaign are thus summarily stated by one who had special means of information: In three months Jackson had marched six hundred miles, fought four pitched battles, seven minor engagements, and daily skirmishes; had defeated four armies, captured seven pieces of artillery, ten thousand stand of arms, four thousand prisoners, and a very great amount of stores, inflicting upon his adversaries a known loss of two thousand men, with a
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
een better founded, would have justified the refusal to diminish the force held for the protection of their capital. Indeed, our cavalry, in observation near Fredericksburg, reported that on the 24th McDowell's troops started southward, but General Stuart found that night that they were returning. This indicated that the anticipt. It is also my opinion that, had the command of General McDowell joined the Army of the Potomac in the month of May, by the way of Hanover Court-House, from Fredericksburg, we would have had Richmond within a week after the junction. Court martial of General McDowell, Washington, December 10, 1862. Let us first inquire when, was reported to be preparing to join Bank's command. The alarm at Washington had caused McDowell's corps to be withdrawn from the upper Rappahannock to Fredericksburg. Jackson, anxious to take advantage of the then divided condition of the enemy, sent to Richmond for reenforcements, but our condition there did not enable u
Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
nsportation, so as to approach directly to Richmond, soon followed. We had then no defenses on the James River below Drewry's Bluff, about seven miles distant from Richmond. There an earthwork had been constructed and provided with an armament of f was increased by the addition of Bryan's regiment of Georgia Rifles. After the repulse of the enemy's gunboats at Drewry's Bluff, I wrote General Johnston a letter to be handed to him by my aide, Colonel G. W. C. Lee, an officer of the highest intelligence and reputation—referring to him for full information in regard to the affair at Drewry's Bluff, as well as to the positions and strength of our forces on the south side of the James River. After some speculations on the probable course ofst valued, and the destruction of the Virginia had left the James River open to his fleet and transports as far up as Drewry's Bluff, and the withdrawal of General Johnston across the Chickahominy made it quite practicable for him to transfer his arm
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
lellan position of McDowell strength of opposing forces Jackson's expedition down the Shenandoah Valley panic at Washingtrrisonburg to relieve General Banks and capture or destroy Jackson's and Ewell's forces. You are instructed, laying aside foith Harrisonburg. Over the South River there was a ford. Jackson's immediate command was encamped on the high ground north Conrad's Store. Each was about fifteen miles distant from Jackson's position. To prevent a junction, the bridge over the rined. This regiment was in rear of the column when we left Jackson to gain the path in the woods, and, before it filed out ofn, was detained for the defense of the Federal capital. Jackson's bold strategy had effected the object for which his movevanced and occupied Harrisonburg, about fifteen miles from Jackson's position. Fremont, with a force estimated at fifteen thch have already been described, and brought into full play Jackson's military genius. In all these operations there conspi
Buffalo, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
ce from various quarters leaves no doubt that the enemy in great force are marching on Washington. You will please organize and forward immediately all the militia and volunteer force in your State. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. This alarm at Washington, and the call for more troops for its defense, produced a most indescribable panic in the cities of the Northern states on Sunday the 25th, and two or three days afterward. The governor of New York on Sunday night telegraphed to Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and other cities, as follows: Orders from Washington render it necessary to send to that city all the available militia force. What can you do? E. D. Morgan. Governor Curtin of Pennsylvania issued the following order: (General order, no. 23.) headquarters of Pennsylvania militia, Harrisburg, May 26, 1862. On pressing requisition of the President of the United States in the present emergency, it is ordered that the several major-generals, brigad
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
idity as to surprise the enemy, and Ewell, who was in advance, captured most of the troops at Front Royal, and pressed directly on to Winchester, while Jackson, turning across to the road from Strasben, at mid-day on the 26th, we stood on the opposite shore. When the news of the attack on Front Royal, on May 23d, reached General Geary, charged with the protection of the Manassas Gap Railroad,f the report of the movements of the enemy, and of the defeat of a small force he had left at Front Royal in charge of some prisoners and captured stores—the latter, however, the garrison before retr, as we could not waste time chasing Fremont, for it was reported that General Shields was at Front Royal with troops of a different character from those of Fremont's army, who had been encountered ne east in the direction of Port Republic. General Ashby had destroyed all the bridges between Front Royal and Port Republic, to prevent Shields from crossing the Shenandoah to join Fremont. The troo
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
m General Johnston's position defenses of James River attack on Fort Drewry Johnston crosses th the Virginia, and the opening of the lower James River, together with the fact that McClellan's arnd. In consequence of the opening of the James River to the enemy's fleet, the attempts to utilin followed. We had then no defenses on the James River below Drewry's Bluff, about seven miles disepelling an attempt by the fleet to pass up James River, was quite insufficient to prevent the enemngth of our forces on the south side of the James River. After some speculations on the probable che destruction of the Virginia had left the James River open to his fleet and transports as far up ticable for him to transfer his army to the James River, the south side of which had then but weak s corps with him. The count states: The James River, which had been closed until then by the prrevent him from moving to the south side of James River, so as not only to secure the cooperation o[1 more...]
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