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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. Search the whole document.

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John Esten Cooke (search for this): chapter 1.7
d by one who had special means of information: In three months Jackson had marched six hundred miles, fought four pitched battles, seven minor engagements, and daily skirmishes; had defeated four armies, captured seven pieces of artillery, ten thousand stand of arms, four thousand prisoners, and a very great amount of stores, inflicting upon his adversaries a known loss of two thousand men, with a loss upon his own part comparatively small. Stonewall Jackson, military biography by John Esten Cooke, p. 194. The general effect upon the affairs of the Confederacy was even more important, and the motives which influenced Jackson present him in a grander light than any military success could have done. Thus, on March 20, 1862, he learned that the large force of the enemy before which he had retired was returning down the Valley, and, divining the object to be to send forces to the east side of the mountain to cooperate in the attack upon Richmond, General Jackson, with his small
Percy Wyndham (search for this): chapter 1.7
c. General Ashby had destroyed all the bridges between Front Royal and Port Republic, to prevent Shields from crossing the Shenandoah to join Fremont. The troops were now permitted to make shorter marches, and were allowed some halts to refresh them after their forced marches and frequent combats. Early on June 6th Fremont's reenforced cavalry attacked our cavalry rear guard under General Ashby. A sharp conflict ensued, which resulted in the repulse of the enemy and the capture of Colonel Percy Wyndham, commanding the brigade, and sixty-three others. General Ashby was in position between Harrisonburg and Port Republic, and, after the cavalry combat just described, there were indications of a more serious attack. Ashby sent a message to Ewell, informing him that cavalry supported by infantry was advancing upon his position. The Fifty-eighth Virginia and the First Maryland Regiments were sent to his support. Ashby led the Fiftyeighth Virginia to attack the enemy, who were under c
C. B. Winder (search for this): chapter 1.7
Harpers Ferry, and he was resolved they should not rest on Virginia soil. General Winder's brigade in the advance found the enemy drawn up in line of battle at Chadvance of General Shields approached on the 8th, the brigades of Taliaferro and Winder were ordered to occupy positions immediately north of the bridge. The enemy's his forced marches had been made, and on which his best hopes depended. General Winder's brigade moved down the river to attack, when the enemy's battery upon the the battery of the enemy, but our fire proved unequal to theirs, whereupon General Winder, having been reenforced, attempted by a rapid charge to capture it, but encl safely withdrawn except one six-pounder gun. In this critical condition of Winder's command, General Taylor made a successful attack on the left and rear of the aylor, the enemy halted in his advance, and formed a line facing the mountain. Winder succeeded in rallying his command, and our batteries were replaced in their for
John A. Dix (search for this): chapter 1.7
g, we would have had Richmond within a week after the junction. Court martial of General McDowell, Washington, December 10, 1862. Let us first inquire what was the size of this army so crippled for want of reenforcement, and then what the strength of that to which it was opposed. On April 30, 1862, the official report of McClellan's army gives the aggregate present for duty as 112,392; Report on the Conduct of the War, Part I, p. 322. that of June 20th —omitting the army corps of General Dix, then, as previously, stationed at Fortress Monroe, and including General McCall's division, which had recently joined, the strength of which was reported to be 9,514— gives the aggregate present for duty as 105,825, and the total, present and absent, as 156,838. Ibid., p. 337. Two statements of the strength of our army under General J. E. Johnston during the month of May—in which General McClellan testified that he was greatly in need of McDowell's corps—give the following results
T. J. Jackson (search for this): chapter 1.7
panic at Washington and the North movements to intercept Jackson his rapid movements Repulses Fremont advance of Shield for, as will be seen, the operations in the Valley by General Jackson, who there exhibited a rapidity of movement equal to tre what caused the panic at Washington. On May 23d, General Jackson, with whose force that of General Ewell had united, mo Front Royal, and pressed directly on to Winchester, while Jackson, turning across to the road from Strasburg, struck the maiap Railroad. Your object will be to capture the forces of Jackson and Ewell, either in cooperation with General Fremont, or,ern society, the excitement was tumultuous. Meanwhile General Jackson, little conceiving the alarm his movements had caused ain column then moved on near to Harper's Ferry, where General Jackson received information that Fremont was moving from the n his rear and thus cut off his retreat. At this time General Jackson's effective force was about fifteen thousand men, much
Turner Ashby (search for this): chapter 1.7
his rapid movements Repulses Fremont advance of Shields fall of Ashby battle of Port Republic results of this campaign. The withdrawtown, turned toward the east in the direction of Port Republic. General Ashby had destroyed all the bridges between Front Royal and Port Repumont's reenforced cavalry attacked our cavalry rear guard under General Ashby. A sharp conflict ensued, which resulted in the repulse of thePercy Wyndham, commanding the brigade, and sixty-three others. General Ashby was in position between Harrisonburg and Port Republic, and, aft just described, there were indications of a more serious attack. Ashby sent a message to Ewell, informing him that cavalry supported by inirginia and the First Maryland Regiments were sent to his support. Ashby led the Fiftyeighth Virginia to attack the enemy, who were under cod three missing. Here fell the stainless, fearless cavalier, General Turner Ashby, of whom General Jackson in his report thus forcibly speaks:
Columbus, Ohio, May 26, 1862. To the gallant men of Ohio. I have the astounding intelligence that the seat of our beloved Government is threatened with invasion, and am called upon by the Secretary of War for troops to repel and overwhelm the ruthless invaders. Rally, then, men of Ohio, and respond to this call, as becomes those who appreciate our glorious Government! . . . The number wanted from each county has been indicated by special dispatches to the several military committees. David Tod, Governor. At the same time the Secretary of War at Washington caused the following order to be issued: Washington, Sunday, May 25, 1862. Ordered: By virtue of the authority vested by an act of Congress, the President takes military possession of all the railroads in the United States from and after this date, and directs that the respective railroad companies, their officers and servants, shall hold themselves in readiness for the transportation of troops and munitions of wa
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1.7
had so persistently applied, he had received the division which he most valued, and the destruction of the Virginia had left the James River open to his fleet and transports as far up as Drewry's Bluff, and the withdrawal of General Johnston across the Chickahominy made it quite practicable for him to transfer his army to the James River, the south side of which had then but weak defenses, and thus by a short march to gain more than all the advantages which, at a later period of the war, General Grant obtained at the sacrifice of a hecatomb of soldiers. Referring again to the work of the Comte de Paris, who may be better authority in regard to what occurred in the army of the enemy than when he writes about Confederate affairs, it appears that this change of base was considered and not adopted because of General Mc-Clellan's continued desire to have McDowell's corps with him. The count states: The James River, which had been closed until then by the presence of the Virginia, as
Winfield Scott (search for this): chapter 1.7
escribes his chief at that moment thus: Jackson was on the road, a little in advance of his line, where the fire was hottest, with reins on his horse's neck, seemingly in prayer. Attracted by my approach, he said, in his usual voice, Delightful excitement. He then briefly gave Taylor instructions to move against the battery on the plateau, and sent a young officer from his staff as a guide. The advance of the enemy was checked by an attack on his flank by two of our regiments, under Colonel Scott; this was only a temporary relief, however, for this small command was soon afterward driven back to the woods, with severe loss. Our batteries during the check were all safely withdrawn except one six-pounder gun. In this critical condition of Winder's command, General Taylor made a successful attack on the left and rear of the enemy, which diverted attention from the front, and led to a concentration of his force upon him. Moving to the right along the mountain acclivity, he was un
eral capital. Jackson's bold strategy had effected the object for which his movement was designed, and he slowly retreated to the south bank of the Shenandoah, where he remained undisturbed by the enemy, and had time to recruit his forces, which, by April 28th, amounted to six or seven thousand men. General Banks had advanced and occupied Harrisonburg, about fifteen miles from Jackson's position. Fremont, with a force estimated at fifteen thousand men, was reported to be preparing to join Bank's command. The alarm at Washington had caused McDowell's corps to be withdrawn from the upper Rappahannock to Fredericksburg. Jackson, anxious to take advantage of the then divided condition of the enemy, sent to Richmond for reenforcements, but our condition there did not enable us to furnish any, except the division of Ewell, which had been left near Gordonsville in observation of McDowell, now by his withdrawal made disposable, and the brigade of Edward Johnson, which confronted Schenc
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