hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. H. F. Lee 1,088 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 999 7 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 676 0 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 496 10 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 465 1 Browse Search
Old Joe Hooker 397 1 Browse Search
McClellan 392 2 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 383 1 Browse Search
Ewell 347 7 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 342 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. Search the whole document.

Found 1,589 total hits in 248 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Jackson County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Chapter 15: Chancellorsville Winter quarters. rations reduced. Hays's Louisiana brigade. officers' servants. Hooker's reorganization. Confederate organization. Hooker's plan of attack. Lee's proposed aggressive. Hooker crosses. Hooker's fatal mistake. Lee's prompt action. the Wilderness. Hooker advances. Lee's advance. Hooker Retreats. Hooker Intrenches. Lee Reconnoitres. Lee's plan of attack. Jackson's march. the movement discovered. Sickles advances. Jackson Deploys. Jackson attacks. Colquitt's blunder. Dowdall's Tavern. casualties. at Hooker's headquarters. defensive measures. Jackson Pauses. a cannonade. wounding of Jackson. Stuart in command. formation for attack. Sickles's midnight attack. Hooker's interior line. Hooker abandons Hazel Grove. Stuart attacks. assaults repulsed. Hazel Grove guns. Federals withdraw. Lee and Stuart meet. Sedgwick's advance. Wilcox on Taylor's Hill. assaults renewed. Early falls back. Salem Chur
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
he fell back, pursued by Hooker. Lee's proposed campaign was another invasion; this time of Pa. He could neither attack Hooker, nor even threaten his rear across the Rappahannock. But he could again sweep the Valley and cross the Potomac; and beyond, both Lee and Jackson imagined great possibilities. Between Jan. and April, 1863, Jackson had his chief engineer, Maj. Hotchkiss, prepare a remarkable map of the country from Winchester to the Susquehanna, compiled from county maps of Md., Va., and Pa. It was on a large scale, and noted farmhouses, with names of occupants. It was used by Lee on the Gettysburg campaign, and has been reproduced on smaller scale in the O. R. Atlas, Plate CXVI. Three months later the opportunity offered, and Lee put it to the test; but his great lieutenant, Jackson, was no longer at the head of his 2d corps. On April 29, Lee found himself anticipated by Hooker's having, the night before, laid pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock, below Deep Run,
ed, supplies of all kinds abundantly furnished. The spirit of the men revived with the consciousness of their immense superiority in numbers and equipment, and it was with good show of reason that Hooker spoke of his army when it took the field, as the finest army on the planet. His organization was as follows, with the strength of each corps present for duty equipped on April 30. corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1stWadsworthPhelps, Cutler, Paul, Meredith1052 ReynoldsRobinsonRoot, Baxter, Leonard 16,908DoubledayRowley, Stone 2dHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook, Brook848 CouchGibbonSully, Owen, Hall 16,893FrenchCarroll, Hays, MacGregor 3dBirneyGraham, Ward, Hayman954 SicklesBerryCarr, Revere, Mott 18,721WhippleFranklin, Bowman, Berdan 5thGriffinBarnes, McQuade, Stockton842 MeadeSykesAyres, Burbank, O'Rorke 15,724HumphreysTyler, Allabach 6thBrooksBrown, Bartlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown, Wheaton 23,667BurnhamBurnham corpsDI
ived with the consciousness of their immense superiority in numbers and equipment, and it was with good show of reason that Hooker spoke of his army when it took the field, as the finest army on the planet. His organization was as follows, with the strength of each corps present for duty equipped on April 30. corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1stWadsworthPhelps, Cutler, Paul, Meredith1052 ReynoldsRobinsonRoot, Baxter, Leonard 16,908DoubledayRowley, Stone 2dHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook, Brook848 CouchGibbonSully, Owen, Hall 16,893FrenchCarroll, Hays, MacGregor 3dBirneyGraham, Ward, Hayman954 SicklesBerryCarr, Revere, Mott 18,721WhippleFranklin, Bowman, Berdan 5thGriffinBarnes, McQuade, Stockton842 MeadeSykesAyres, Burbank, O'Rorke 15,724HumphreysTyler, Allabach 6thBrooksBrown, Bartlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown, Wheaton 23,667BurnhamBurnham corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 11thDevensVon Gilsa, McLean636 How
F. H. Archer (search for this): chapter 15
. P. Hill's10,400Heth, Thomas, Lane, McGowans, Archer, Pender626 Rodes's9,632Rodes, Colquitt, Ramse3d Ga. The two rear brigades, under Thomas and Archer, with Brown's battalion of artillery, were haland Heth were coming in column down the pike. Archer and Thomas were following, but some miles behi 1st. Two brigades were some hours behind, for Archer, without orders, had taken them to protect theed that five of Jackson's 15 brigades (Thomas, Archer, Paxton, Colquitt and Ramseur) were missing frefore the distribution, however, was finished, Archer's and McGowan's brigades were moved forward, fther, ordered the whole line to the attack. Archer's brigade, about 1400 strong, in advancing thrmy's rear-guard. A sharp action ensued, while Archer extended his right and threatened the enemy's became more strenuous. On the extreme right, Archer's brigade had now fallen back to Hazel Grove, d again penetrated the gap between McGowan and Archer. Paxton's brigade was brought across from the[1 more...]
mself by checking it, and the Confederates then slowly withdrew. Long-range firing, however, was kept up until night. Bartlett's brigade reported a loss in this attack of 580 officers and men out of less than 1500 men. Brown's brigade reported a loss of 511. Brooks, commanding the division, said in his official report: — In this brief but sanguinary conflict this division lost nearly 1500 officers and men. Col. H. W. Brown, commanding the Jersey brigade, was severely wounded; and Col. Collet, 1st N. J., Col. G. W. Town, and Lt.-Col. Hall, 95th Pa., were killed. Wilcox's brigade lost 75 killed, 372 wounded, and 48 missing, a total of 495. The losses of Semmes's brigade are included with the campaign losses. One of its regiments, however, the 10th Ga., reports for this day: 21 killed, 102 wounded, and 5 missing, a total of 128 out of 230 present. In the morning at Chancellorsville, this regiment had received the surrender of the 27th Conn., which had been on picket and w
A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 15
ng with his three remaining divisions, under A. P. Hill, Rodes, and Colston. He was joined on the rthe column, Colston's division followed, and A. P. Hill's brought up the rear. The sun rose on Ma soon as the 2d line was formed, and allowed A. P. Hill's division to follow Rodes and Colston in colston's divisions should be re-formed, and that Hill's division should take the lead. It had followd. During the long pause in the advance, while Hill's brigades filed into the woods to the right anank road to Chancellorsville, as he had said to Hill: Press them, Hill! Press them! Cut them off fmed. Lane's N. C. brigade was at the head of Hill's division. One regiment, the 33d, was deploye Jackson's fall left A. P. Hill in command, but Hill was himself soon disabled by a fragment of shelwere formed for the attack in the morning, with Hill's division in front, Colston's in a second linet assault had been made along the whole line by Hill's division. The enemy's advanced line crossed [9 more...]
rnished. The spirit of the men revived with the consciousness of their immense superiority in numbers and equipment, and it was with good show of reason that Hooker spoke of his army when it took the field, as the finest army on the planet. His organization was as follows, with the strength of each corps present for duty equipped on April 30. corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1stWadsworthPhelps, Cutler, Paul, Meredith1052 ReynoldsRobinsonRoot, Baxter, Leonard 16,908DoubledayRowley, Stone 2dHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook, Brook848 CouchGibbonSully, Owen, Hall 16,893FrenchCarroll, Hays, MacGregor 3dBirneyGraham, Ward, Hayman954 SicklesBerryCarr, Revere, Mott 18,721WhippleFranklin, Bowman, Berdan 5thGriffinBarnes, McQuade, Stockton842 MeadeSykesAyres, Burbank, O'Rorke 15,724HumphreysTyler, Allabach 6thBrooksBrown, Bartlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown, Wheaton 23,667BurnhamBurnham corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 15
overed. Sickles advances. Jackson Deploys. Jackson attacks. Colquitt's blunder. Dowdall's Taveurg, Lee placed his army in winter quarters. Jackson was extended along the river, below the town,ssibilities. Between Jan. and April, 1863, Jackson had his chief engineer, Maj. Hotchkiss, prepaput it to the test; but his great lieutenant, Jackson, was no longer at the head of his 2d corps. rps, under Sedgwick, was crossing in front of Jackson. Hooker immediately pushed his force by two at moment it had been uncertain exactly where Jackson would attack. But he now saw that by followi find other routes around the exposed point. Jackson sent a battery to reply and check the enemy fht have routed Anderson at the same time that Jackson was routing Howard. For he was on Anderson's. M., the sun being then about one hour high, Jackson gave the signal to Rodes to move forward. Hil regiments and lines of battle in the rear. Jackson, at the head of his party, was slowly retraci[28 more...]
mseur, Doles, Iverson418 Early's8,243Gordon, Hoke, Smith, Hays418 Colston's6,629Paxton, Jones, Warren, Nichols418 900Corps' Reserve Artillery983 4 Divisions35,79519 Brigades27118 600General Reser brigades formed in line with Ramseur, and in the following order from the left: Nichols, Jones, Warren. About half of each division was on each side of the pike, and two Napoleons of Breathed's horsand pursuit of the 11th corps: to wit, Rodes, Doles, and Iverson of Rodes's division, and Jones, Warren, and Nichols of Colston's division. The great advantage of the Confederates lay in their being ost desirable whenever important orders are issued. He despatched a competent staff-officer, Gen. Warren, his chief engineer, to supervise their execution. Unfortunately for him, however, under theer had sent urgent orders the night before to Sedgwick to come to his help, and a staff-officer, Warren, to supervise their execution. But Sedgwick, though already on the south side of the river, whi
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...