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S. C. Kershaw (search for this): chapter 15
n's8,232Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Posey, Perry418 McLaws's8,567Wofford, Semmes, Kershaw, Barksdale418 850Corps' Reserve Artillery1036 2 Divisions17,6499 Brigades187as wise to be moderately aggressive and keep the enemy in hopes of an attack. Kershaw and Semmes did this handsomely throughout the day, though the threat of Sickleents. He reached this point about 3 P. M., meeting there Wofford's, Semmes's, Kershaw's, and Mahone's brigades, under McLaws. The five brigades rapidly formed a si was put in Salem Church, and one in a schoolhouse a short distance in front. Kershaw's brigade was on the right of Wilcox, and Wofford on right of Kershaw; Semmes'Kershaw; Semmes's brigade was on Wilcox's left, and Mahone's brigade was on the left of Semmes. In front of the line of battle stretched a fringe of dense young wood, some 200 ya field? Confederate casualties COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTALSTREN. S. C. Kershaw's Brig.12902104 Miss. Barksdale's Brig.43208341592 Ga. Semmes's Brig.85
ditional guns to Hazel Grove, and brought forward both the second and third lines, putting in at once his last reserves. It would be useless to follow in detail the desperate fighting which now ensued and was kept up for some hours. The Federal guns on the Fairview heights were able to fire over the heads of two lines of infantry, and other batteries aided from the new position in which Hooker had now established the 1st, 2d, and 5th corps. This was so near on our left that Carroll's and McGregor's brigades of the 2d corps, with artillery, were sent forward to attack our flank, and were only repulsed after such fighting that they lost 367 men. With the aid of our second and third lines, fresh assaults were made on both sides of the Plank road, and now the enemy's second lines were carried. But his reserves were called upon, and again our lines were driven back, and countercharges south of the road again penetrated the gap between McGowan and Archer. Paxton's brigade was brought ac
fficer present, and I was sent for, and directed to reconnoitre, and to post before dawn as many guns as could be used. I spent the night in reconnoissance and, beside the Plank road, could find but one outlet through the forest, a cleared vista some 200 yards long and 25 wide, through a dense pine thicket, opening upon a cleared plateau held by the enemy. This plateau afterward proved to be the Hazel Grove position, and I concentrated near it several batteries. In his Life of Stuart, Maj. McClellan, his adjutant, writes:— Col. Alexander's reconnoissance convinced Stuart that Hazel Grove was the key to the Federal line, and to this part of the field Stuart directed a large share of his personal attention on the morning of the 3d. One of Jackson's engineers was sent by a long detour and found Lee before daylight and explained to him Stuart's position and plans, that he might, during the action, extend his left and seek a connection with our right. During the night, the briga
avalry. Hooker, however, was not entirely blind to this weakness of his line. He inspected it early next morning, May 2, and ordered changes and enjoined vigilance which might have saved him from the surprise of the afternoon, had he not, like Pope in his campaign of the previous fall, failed to fathom the boldness of Lee's designs even after discovering the Confederate movements. Lee appreciated that Hooker's withdrawal into the Wilderness was not forced, but to fortify and concentrate. eploying point on the turnpike by 4 P. M. The distance had proven greater than anticipated, and time was now of priceless value. Meanwhile the movement, though misunderstood, had been detected by the enemy. Jackson's celebrated march around Pope had also been discovered by the enemy as soon as it was begun, but had also been misunderstood—doubtless for a similar reason. No one could conceive that Lee would deliberately plan so unwise a move as this was conceived to be — dividing his army
Mott 18,721WhippleFranklin, Bowman, Berdan 5thGriffinBarnes, McQuade, Stockton842 MeadeSykesAyres, Burbank, O'Rorke 15,724HumphreysTyler, Allabach 6thBrooksBrown, Bartlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown, Wheaton 23,667BurnhamBurnham corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 11thDevensVon Gilsa, McLean636 HowardVon SteinwehrBuschbeck, Barlow 12,977SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski 12th528 SlocumWilliamsKnipe, Ross, Ruger 13,450GearyCandy, Kane, Greene CavalryPleasontonDavis, Devin522 StonemanAverellSargent, McIntosh GreggKilpatrick, Wyndham 11,544Reserve Brig.Buford 1,610Artillery Reserve1258 2,217Provost Guard210 8 Corps, 23 Divisions, 64 Brigades, 133,711 Men, 74 Batteries, 404 Guns The nearest Confederate return is for March 21. It is not entirely complete for the artillery and cavalry, but, estimating for them, Lee's organization and strength at that date was as follows: 1ST corps, Longstreet's, march 31, 1863 DIVISI
Krzyzanowski (search for this): chapter 15
tlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown, Wheaton 23,667BurnhamBurnham corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 11thDevensVon Gilsa, McLean636 HowardVon SteinwehrBuschbeck, Barlow 12,977SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski 12th528 SlocumWilliamsKnipe, Ross, Ruger 13,450GearyCandy, Kane, Greene CavalryPleasontonDavis, Devin522 StonemanAverellSargent, McIntosh GreggKilpatrick, Wyndham 11,544Reserve Brig.Buford 1,610Artillery Reserve1258 2,217Provost Guard by a road to the White House, called the Bullock road. The casualties in Schurz's division were 919. In Buschbeck's brigade were 483. The total loss of Howard's corps was: killed, KILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Schimmelpfennig84215120419 Krzyzanowski45277178500 Buschbeck's26229228483 Total1557215261402 217; wounded, 1221; missing, 974; total, 2412; only about 20 per cent of the corps. It was a very trifling loss, compared with what it might have been had all of Jackson's troops been
orpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 11thDevensVon Gilsa, McLean636 HowardVon SteinwehrBuschbeck, Barlow 12,977SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski 12th528 SlocumWilliamsKnipe, Ross, Ruger 's tavern, was a line of rifle-pits at right angles to the Plank road, and already occupied by Buschbeck's brigade of Von Steinwehr's division, the last of Howard's corps — its companion brigade, Barhere. The Federal artillery foresaw the end and fled, five guns being too late and captured. Buschbeck followed in fairly good order, but preceded by a stampede of troops and trains, principally dothe White House, called the Bullock road. The casualties in Schurz's division were 919. In Buschbeck's brigade were 483. The total loss of Howard's corps was: killed, KILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Schimmelpfennig84215120419 Krzyzanowski45277178500 Buschbeck's26229228483 Total1557215261402 217; wounded, 1221; missing, 974; total, 2412; only about 20 per cent of the corps. It was a very
D. Kilpatrick (search for this): chapter 15
2 MeadeSykesAyres, Burbank, O'Rorke 15,724HumphreysTyler, Allabach 6thBrooksBrown, Bartlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown, Wheaton 23,667BurnhamBurnham corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 11thDevensVon Gilsa, McLean636 HowardVon SteinwehrBuschbeck, Barlow 12,977SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski 12th528 SlocumWilliamsKnipe, Ross, Ruger 13,450GearyCandy, Kane, Greene CavalryPleasontonDavis, Devin522 StonemanAverellSargent, McIntosh GreggKilpatrick, Wyndham 11,544Reserve Brig.Buford 1,610Artillery Reserve1258 2,217Provost Guard210 8 Corps, 23 Divisions, 64 Brigades, 133,711 Men, 74 Batteries, 404 Guns The nearest Confederate return is for March 21. It is not entirely complete for the artillery and cavalry, but, estimating for them, Lee's organization and strength at that date was as follows: 1ST corps, Longstreet's, march 31, 1863 DIVISIONSSTRENGTHBRIGADESBATTS.guns Anderson's8,232Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Posey, Perry4
HBRIGADESBATTS.guns Anderson's8,232Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Posey, Perry418 McLaws's8,567Wofford, Semmes, Kershaw, Barksdale's battalion, moved upon the former; Wright's, Perry's, and Posey's brigades, with the remainder of Alexander's battalion, onents of cavalry and some horse artillery under Pleasonton. Posey's brigade held the left flank of Lee's line of battle in Hoer's front, while Jackson conducted the flanking movement. Posey had a strong force of skirmishers in front, which became ho reinforcements, the Federals made several efforts to carry Posey's position, but were always repulsed. Sickles then plannedied to lie quiet and repel them, as on the left in front of Posey. But on the Confederate right the Federal skirmish-line, uwith his three remaining brigades, — Wright's, Perry's, and Posey's,—was sent at 4 P. M. to watch that road, and threaten theox's Brig.7237291535 Va. Mahone's Brig.2413497255 Miss. Posey's Brig.4118465290 Ga. Wright's Brig.25271296 Fla. Perry
S. C. McGowan (search for this): chapter 15
on, A. P. Hill had deployed Pender on the left of the pike. Lane, McGowan, and Heth were coming in column down the pike. Archer and Thomas w position. The left wing of this force grazed the skirmishers of McGowan and struck the right flank of Lane's brigade, of which two and a ht up. Before the distribution, however, was finished, Archer's and McGowan's brigades were moved forward, from their retired positions as thes, drifted to the right, and gradually opened a gap between it and McGowan's brigade, emerging from the forest alone, and in front of the enemained, supporting the guns now taking position there. This left McGowan's flank uncovered, and a Federal force attacked it, and drove it countercharges south of the road again penetrated the gap between McGowan and Archer. Paxton's brigade was brought across from the north anCorps235 Headquarters, 1st Div.224 Va. Heth's Brig.44259303 S. C. McGowan's Brig. From Report of Surgeon Guild, excluding slightly wou
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