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Kelly's Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
in the O. R. Atlas, Plate CXVI. Three months later the opportunity offered, and Lee put it to the test; but his great lieutenant, Jackson, was no longer at the head of his 2d corps. On April 29, Lee found himself anticipated by Hooker's having, the night before, laid pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock, below Deep Run, at the site of Franklin's crossing in Dec. Hooker had commenced his movement, on the 27th, by going with the 5th, 11th, and 12th corps to cross the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford, above the mouth of the Rapidan, 27 miles from Fredericksburg. A picket, at this point, was driven off, a pontoon bridge laid, and the whole force, about 42,000 men, was across the river on the 29th, when the 6th corps, under Sedgwick, was crossing in front of Jackson. Hooker immediately pushed his force by two roads from Kelly's to Germanna and Ely's fords of the Rapidan — about 11 miles off, and, on arriving, the troops forded, although the water was nearly shoulder deep. The fording
North Anna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
after the battle of Fredericksburg, Lee placed his army in winter quarters. Jackson was extended along the river, below the town, as far as Port Royal, his own headquarters being at a hunting lodge on the lawn of a Mr. Corbin, at Moss Neck, 11 miles below Fredericksburg. Longstreet was encamped from a little above Fredericksburg to Massaponax Creek. Lee established his headquarters in a camp a short distance in rear of Hamilton's Crossing. Most of the artillery was sent back to the North Anna River for convenience of supply. My own battalion occupied a wood at Mt. Carmel church, five miles north of Hanover Junction, the horses being sheltered in an adjoining pine thicket. On the occasion of Burnside's Mud March, we marched about halfway to Fredericksburg, but were then allowed to return. The infantry generally did not leave their camps, as there was nowhere any fighting. Although so near to Richmond, the army was inadequately clothed, shod, and fed, in spite of Lee's earnes
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
en shoes are supplied, the men will be unable to wear them for a long while, such is the horrible condition of their feet from long exposure. This destitution, in the way of clothing, is not compensated by close shelter or abundant food, for the troops have no tents, and are almost totally unprovided with cooking utensils for the petty rations they receive. . . . Troops from other States are supplied, indeed, in a great degree by individual contributions from their homes, while we of Louisiana have received nothing whatever, since the fall of New Orleans, with the exception, I believe, of a company of the 9th regiment. Troops from the more distant States suffered many more privations, both in food and clothing, than those near home. Some of the State governments also did much toward the clothing of their own troops, and private families, too, sent largely both of food and clothing to their members in the armies. Without such help, Confederate officers would often have s
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
2 Divisions17,6499 Brigades1872 2D corps, Jackson's A. P. Hill's10,400Heth, Thomas, Lane, Mcickles came to Birney's position and observed Jackson's column. His official report says:— Thiave narrowed the enemy's avenue of escape. Jackson's instructions had been explicit. Rodes's reween some of these troops and small bodies of Jackson's men still making their way forward. The 8ts tavern. The cessation was not voluntary on Jackson's part, but it was necessary that Rodes's andbly fine. A little before dark, Stuart, with Jackson's consent, had taken his cavalry and a regime and was forming for the assault, when one of Jackson's staff brought the message of recall. He orttention on the morning of the 3d. One of Jackson's engineers was sent by a long detour and fount in the Confederate, in two days fighting. Jackson's three divisions had a paper strength of 26,by promoting him to the now vacant command of Jackson's corps. Ewell, who did succeed Jackson, was[10 more...]
Hazel Grove (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
. Hooker's interior line. Hooker abandons Hazel Grove. Stuart attacks. assaults repulsed. HazeHazel Grove guns. Federals withdraw. Lee and Stuart meet. Sedgwick's advance. Wilcox on Taylor's Hio the left, was the small settlement called Hazel Grove, occupying some high open fields, from whicd that morning discovered Jackson's march. Hazel Grove offered excellent positions for attacking the Fairview lines, but Hazel Grove was itself within the Federal lines, and, about sundown, was occof the 4th Ga., had stampeded the trains at Hazel Grove, and had been heavily cannonaded by the Fednder's reconnoissance convinced Stuart that Hazel Grove was the key to the Federal line, and to thiont of the Fairview line, with Sickles near Hazel Grove upon its right flank, he ordered Sickles toaking a third line. The two divisions from Hazel Grove, with their four batteries, were brought up the Chancellorsville house. The guns at Hazel Grove moved forward across the valley and occupie[5 more...]
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
eanwhile, two divisions of the 2d corps had moved up from Fredericksburg to United States Ford, where they laid a pontoon bridge about noon on the 30th. By 9 P. M. ancellorsville, about two miles northeastward to the Rappahannock, covering United States Ford. Westward it covered the Plank road for about three miles, ending in erates in possession, continued his march on the north side, and crossed at United States Ford. Anderson's four remaining brigades, with McLaws's three, were ordee remaining brigade of Berry's division, which had been guarding bridges at United States Ford. Meanwhile, as darkness fell, the Confederate pursuit died out upon, as he had said to Hill: Press them, Hill! Press them! Cut them off from United States Ford. It would, however, have been an error to make such a diversion, for 28th, 18th, 37th, 7th. The Bullock road here diverged to the left, toward United States Ford, but the enemy was evidently close in front, and Jackson said to Lane,
Taylor's Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Hooker abandons Hazel Grove. Stuart attacks. assaults repulsed. Hazel Grove guns. Federals withdraw. Lee and Stuart meet. Sedgwick's advance. Wilcox on Taylor's Hill. assaults renewed. Early falls back. Salem Church. casualties. Early's division. Lee organizes an attack. Sedgwick driven across. Soon after the battngly. To advance up the Plank road, it was necessary to march to Fredericksburg and force the Confederate lines on Marye's Hill. These lines were held from Taylor's Hill to the Howison house, about three miles, by only two brigades, Barksdale's and Hays's, with a small amount of artillery. The regiments were strung out in sing messenger brought word of the advance of Gibbon's division. Thereupon leaving a picket of 50 men and two guns in observation at Banks Ford, Wilcox marched to Taylor's Hill. About 10 A. M., Gibbon having reported that an attack on our extreme left was impracticable, and Howe's division, making no progress east of Hazel Run, Sed
Port Royal, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
t attack. Hooker's interior line. Hooker abandons Hazel Grove. Stuart attacks. assaults repulsed. Hazel Grove guns. Federals withdraw. Lee and Stuart meet. Sedgwick's advance. Wilcox on Taylor's Hill. assaults renewed. Early falls back. Salem Church. casualties. Early's division. Lee organizes an attack. Sedgwick driven across. Soon after the battle of Fredericksburg, Lee placed his army in winter quarters. Jackson was extended along the river, below the town, as far as Port Royal, his own headquarters being at a hunting lodge on the lawn of a Mr. Corbin, at Moss Neck, 11 miles below Fredericksburg. Longstreet was encamped from a little above Fredericksburg to Massaponax Creek. Lee established his headquarters in a camp a short distance in rear of Hamilton's Crossing. Most of the artillery was sent back to the North Anna River for convenience of supply. My own battalion occupied a wood at Mt. Carmel church, five miles north of Hanover Junction, the horses being
Rapidan (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ree months later the opportunity offered, and Lee put it to the test; but his great lieutenant, Jackson, was no longer at the head of his 2d corps. On April 29, Lee found himself anticipated by Hooker's having, the night before, laid pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock, below Deep Run, at the site of Franklin's crossing in Dec. Hooker had commenced his movement, on the 27th, by going with the 5th, 11th, and 12th corps to cross the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford, above the mouth of the Rapidan, 27 miles from Fredericksburg. A picket, at this point, was driven off, a pontoon bridge laid, and the whole force, about 42,000 men, was across the river on the 29th, when the 6th corps, under Sedgwick, was crossing in front of Jackson. Hooker immediately pushed his force by two roads from Kelly's to Germanna and Ely's fords of the Rapidan — about 11 miles off, and, on arriving, the troops forded, although the water was nearly shoulder deep. The fording was kept up all night by light of
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
the town, as far as Port Royal, his own headquarters being at a hunting lodge on the lawn of a Mr. Corbin, at Moss Neck, 11 miles below Fredericksburg. Longstreet was encamped from a little above Fredericksburg to Massaponax Creek. Lee established his headquarters in a camp a short distance in rear of Hamilton's Crossing. Most of the artillery was sent back to the North Anna River for convenience of supply. My own battalion occupied a wood at Mt. Carmel church, five miles north of Hanover Junction, the horses being sheltered in an adjoining pine thicket. On the occasion of Burnside's Mud March, we marched about halfway to Fredericksburg, but were then allowed to return. The infantry generally did not leave their camps, as there was nowhere any fighting. Although so near to Richmond, the army was inadequately clothed, shod, and fed, in spite of Lee's earnest efforts. As far back as April 28, 1862, the meat ration had been reduced from 12 to 8 ounces, and a small extra allowa
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