hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. H. F. Lee 1,088 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 999 7 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 676 0 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 496 10 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 465 1 Browse Search
Old Joe Hooker 397 1 Browse Search
McClellan 392 2 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 383 1 Browse Search
Ewell 347 7 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 342 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. Search the whole document.

Found 1,217 total hits in 290 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Manchester (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Emmitsburg to Westminster. On the 30th, his advanced corps moved forward within a few miles of Gettysburg on his left, to Littletown in the centre, and toward Manchester on his right. He now found that Lee was withdrawing and concentrating near Cashtown. He wrongly ascribed this to his own advance from Frederick, and publish rest his troops, he still, on the 1st, ordered a further advance of each of his seven corps, as follows: The 5th corps was ordered to Hanover; the 6th corps to Manchester; the 12th corps to Two Taverns; the 3d corps to Emmitsburg, and the 1st and 11th corps to Gettysburg. These advances were not intended to bring on a battle, the morning. The 5th corps, marching from Hanover at 7 P. M., arrived on the field, 14 miles, at 8 A. M. on the 2d. The 6th corps, from the Union right at Manchester, arrived about 2 P. M., after a march of about 32 miles in 17 hours. At 8 A. M. of the 2d, therefore, practically the whole of both armies was upon the field
Aldie (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
marching for Culpeper on the 14th, and, on the 15th, Longstreet marched from Culpeper to take position east of the Blue Ridge, while Hill passed in his rear and crossed the mountains to Winchester via Front Royal. When Hill was safely in the Valley, Longstreet also entered through Ashby's and Snicker's gaps, and about the 20th the two corps were united. The cavalry had acted as a screen in front of Longstreet during this advance, and, in this duty, had severe encounters with the enemy at Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville, losing in them over 500 in killed, wounded, and missing. About June 22, as Hill and Longstreet drew near the Potomac, ready to cross, Stuart made to Lee a very unwise proposition, which Lee more unwisely entertained. It was destined to have an unfortunate influence on the campaign. Stuart thus refers to the matter in his official report:— I submitted to the commanding general the plan of leaving a brigade or so in my present front, passing through Hopewe
Shippensburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
. But his orders led Stuart toward the Susquehanna, so he proceeded north to Hanover, which was reached at 10 A. M. on the 30th. Here he had a sharp skirmish with Kilpatrick's cavalry. Hampered by his 125 captured wagons, he turned squarely to the right, and, making a detour by Jefferson, he reached Dover on the morning of July 1, crossing during the night the road on which Early's division had marched on the 30th from York to Heidlersburg. Here he learned that Early had gone toward Shippensburg. Stuart was practically lost, and had to guess in which direction he should go to find Lee's army. Lee was now beginning the battle of Gettysburg, 25 miles off to the southwest. Stuart's report says:— After as little rest as was compatible with the exhausted condition of the command, I pushed on for Carlisle [25 miles to the northwest], where I hoped to find a portion of our army. He arrived before Carlisle in the afternoon. His rations were now entirely exhausted. He desired to
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
scout. orders. chance encounter. Hill to Gettysburg. Meade's movement. Reynolds to Gettysburg.Gettysburg. battle Opens. Archer captured. Rodes Arrives. Early Arrives. Lee orders pursuit. Ewell stops on with the system. And the fine service at Gettysburg by the Federal reserve of 110 guns, under Hu followed the direct road, via Littletown to Gettysburg, only about 16 miles away, it could have occed some strong position between Cashtown and Gettysburg, and the onus of attack would have been uponved a despatch from Lee that the army was at Gettysburg [about 30 miles south] and had been engaged Heth heard that shoes could be purchased in Gettysburg, and, with Hill's permission, authorized Pet of collision was his hearing Hill's guns at Gettysburg. He was much disturbed by it, not wishing t report, as follows: At 3 P. M. I arrived at Gettysburg and assumed the command. At this time the 1witnessed the flight of the Federals through Gettysburg and up the hills beyond. He then directed m[27 more...]
Middletown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ler was now reenforced by Rowley's division of the same corps, which extended its line farther to the right. Robinson's division also approached and was held in reserve near by. Later, as the engagement grew more severe, it was also put into the battle. Meanwhile, Hill had formed Pender's division in line of battle in rear of Heth, but it was held in reserve for some time, as Heth about noon received a reinforcement by the arrival of Rodes's division, on his left flank, coining in from Middletown. About the same time, also, the head of the 11th corps, under Howard, arrived at Gettysburg, and Howard succeeded Reynolds in command of the field. He halted Steinwehr's division, two brigades, on Cemetery Hill, as a reserve, and advanced Schurz and Barlow to the front. With these he formed line to cover the approaches from the north as far east as Rock Creek. This disposition was bad. The force was small for so long a line, and its right flank was in the air near the Heidlersburg roa
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
s of attack would have been upon the Federals, as had been the plan of the campaign. But his orders led Stuart toward the Susquehanna, so he proceeded north to Hanover, which was reached at 10 A. M. on the 30th. Here he had a sharp skirmish with Kilpatrick's cavalry. Hampered by his 125 captured wagons, he turned squarely to tw announced his intention to rest his troops, he still, on the 1st, ordered a further advance of each of his seven corps, as follows: The 5th corps was ordered to Hanover; the 6th corps to Manchester; the 12th corps to Two Taverns; the 3d corps to Emmitsburg, and the 1st and 11th corps to Gettysburg. These advances were not inteved. The 2d corps, having come from Taneytown, also reached the field soon after nightfall, and was all at hand in the morning. The 5th corps, marching from Hanover at 7 P. M., arrived on the field, 14 miles, at 8 A. M. on the 2d. The 6th corps, from the Union right at Manchester, arrived about 2 P. M., after a march of ab
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ds exposed to raids of the enemy from either the east or the west. In this position, a drawn battle, or even a victory, would still leave us compelled soon to find our way back across the Potomac. Longstreet Manassas to Appomattox, p. 327. tells of his having suggested to Secretary Seddon such a campaign against Rosecrans, and he also suggested it to Lee on his arrival at Fredericksburg. Mr. Seddon thought Grant could not be drawn from Vicksburg even by a Confederate advance upon the Ohio River. To this Longstreet answered that Grant was a soldier and must obey orders if popular alarm forced the government to recall him. At that time Davis was sanguine of foreign intervention, and the Emperor Napoleon was permitting a French firm to build some formidable ironclads for the Confederate navy. These might have accomplished some results, had not the issue of the Gettysburg campaign induced the Emperor to withdraw his consent to their delivery. Lee recognized the strong features o
Berryville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
at first, hoping to accomplish his purpose by gradual suggestion and request. The process was too slow, and the result was unfortunate. Only on June 23 from Berryville, Va., did he fully explain to the President his wishes. On the 25th, from Williamsport, he followed the matter up with two letters, urging the organization of an of his infantry brigades, with loss of three guns and 907 men. Stuart's loss was 485. On June 10, Ewell's corps left Culpeper for the Valley. Rodes moved to Berryville, while Early and Johnson advanced upon Winchester, and, on the 13th and 14th, drove Milroy's forces into the city. Preparations were made to storm the fortifiee flank near Stephenson's depot by Steuart's and the Stonewall brigade, and were routed with the loss of about 2400 men and 23 guns. Rodes's division, going by Berryville, had driven the enemy from that point on the 13th, and on the 14th had captured Martinsburg late in the afternoon, taking five guns and many stores. Most of t
Parr's Ridge (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
slowly than it would have been had the movements of the Federal army been known. Accordingly, on the 29th, orders were sent, countermanding those of the day before and directing movements which would concentrate the three corps at Cashtown, eight miles west of Gettysburg. There was no urgency about the orders, which indicates that Lee had not yet selected any particular site for his coming battle. Meade, however, very soon after taking command on the 28th, had selected a position, Parr's Ridge, behind Pipe Creek, on the divide between the waters of the Potomac and Chesapeake Bay. Here he, too, hoped to fight on the defensive. It would have been safe play, but not so brilliant as what Hooker had proposed, or as what Lee himself had used with Pope in Aug., 1862. On June 29, Hill moved Heth's division from Fayetteville to Cashtown, about 10 miles. Heth heard that shoes could be purchased in Gettysburg, and, with Hill's permission, authorized Pettigrew's brigade to go there n
Rock Creek, Menard County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
eeded Reynolds in command of the field. He halted Steinwehr's division, two brigades, on Cemetery Hill, as a reserve, and advanced Schurz and Barlow to the front. With these he formed line to cover the approaches from the north as far east as Rock Creek. This disposition was bad. The force was small for so long a line, and its right flank was in the air near the Heidlersburg road, by which Early was now drawing near. For a while, however, the Federal forces were superior in numbers at the er mile. Their flanks were at once unassailable and unturnable. Their left, which was the top of the fish-hook shank, rested on Big and Little Round Top mountains; and their right, which was the point of the fish-hook, was on Culp's Hill over Rock Creek. Both flanks presented precipitous and rocky fronts, screened from artillery fire by forest growth, and the convexity of the line was such that the two flanks approached and each was able to reinforce the other. The shank of the fish-hook ran
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...