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Gibbon Meade (search for this): chapter 16
eiving any reinforcements, doubtless increased Meade's confidence in all his later movements. The favor, when the choice was between Hooker and Meade, as successor to Burnside. They still supportnto collision with Hooker still in command. Meade succeeded Hooker. He was an excellent fighterlicate orders, relieving Hooker and installing Meade, were sent that afternoon by Hardie, Stanton's chief of staff. He delivered the order to Meade about midnight, while Hooker was still in ignorane to give the approximate locations of five of Meade's seven corps, three being near Frederick and Lee's plans. He was specially anxious to hold Meade east of the Blue Ridge, and not have him come ed any particular site for his coming battle. Meade, however, very soon after taking command on thngton the artillery and stores of the post. Meade knew that Ewell's corps was between York and Cion before he had been superseded. Although Meade had selected his proposed line of battle behin[9 more...]
E. P. Alexander (search for this): chapter 16
et DIVISIONSSTRENGTHBRIGADE COMMANDERBATTS.guns McLaws7,311 Kershaw, Barksdale, Semmes, Wofford Pickett5,200 Garnett, Kemper, Armistead Hood7,720 Law, Robertson, Anderson, G. T. Benning Arty. Battns.1,000 Cabell, Dearing, Henry, Walton, Alexander2184 Totals21,231 11 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 2D corps. Ewell Early6,943 Hays, Smith, Hoke, Gordon Johnson5,564 Stuart, Walker, Nichols, Jones Rodes8,454 Daniel, Doles, Iverson, Ramseur, O'Neal Arty. Battns.1,000 Jones, Latimerwood with orders to come to Gettysburg, 17 miles. About midnight they bivouacked four miles from the field. Marching again at dawn on the 2d, they arrived near the field between 6 and 8 A. M. His reserve artillery (the Washington artillery and Alexander's battalion), which was ordered to follow the infantry from Greenwood at midnight, was much detained upon the road by passing trains, and did not reach the field until 9 A. M. Law's brigade of Hood's division, recalled from New Guilford C. H
une 10, Ewell's corps left Culpeper for the Valley. Rodes moved to Berryville, while Early and Johnson advanced upon Winchester, and, on the 13th and 14th, drove Milroy's forces into the city. Preparations were made to storm the fortified line at dawn on the 15th, an enterprise which might easily have been disastrous, had they been well defended. But Milroy saw his communications threatened, and did not wait for the attack. About dawn, his retreating forces were struck in the flank near Stephenson's depot by Steuart's and the Stonewall brigade, and were routed with the loss of about 2400 men and 23 guns. Rodes's division, going by Berryville, had driv reached Williamsport at dark and at once crossed three brigades and three batteries over the Potomac. The marches made by Ewell's whole corps in this swoop upon Milroy, and the fruits of victory secured, compare well with the work of the same corps under Jackson 13 months before. Early and Johnson, advancing upon Winchester, ma
rlowVon Gilsa, Ames HowardSteinwehrCoster, Smith 10,576SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski526 12th CorpsWilliamsMcDougall, Lockwood, Ruger Slocum 8,597GearyCandy, Cobham, Greene420 2,568TylerArtillery Reserve21110 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY 2,580Engineers, Provost Guard's Escorts 100,2837 Corps, 19 Divisions, 51 Brigades, Infantry and Artillery58312 Cavalry Corps Pleasonton 14,973Buford Gregg, D. KilpatrickGamble, Devin, Merritt McIntosh, Huey, Gregg, J. Farnsworth, Custer950 115,2568 Corps, 22 Divisions, 59 Brigades67362 The Confederate infantry by this time were about nine-tenths armed with the rifled musket, muzzle loading, mostly of calibre .58, but some of calibre .54. Their artillery was now, also, all organized into battalions, usually of four-gun batteries each. Each corps had five of these battalions. One of these served with each of the three divisions, and the remaining two constituted a corps reserve, under command of the senior artillery o
ded, soon after the battle of Chancellorsville, in a council between Mr. Lincoln, Halleck, and Stanton, that Hooker should never again be intrusted with the conduct of a battle. He could not be at once removed on account of the support of politicians who desired to have Secretary Chase succeed Mr. Lincoln as President. This party, with the active aid of Chase, had placed Hooker in his position by turning the scale in his favor, when the choice was between Hooker and Meade, as successor to Burnside. They still supported Hooker strongly, and a dead-lock was only averted by Chase's friends consenting to a change of the commander in case Hooker should voluntarily resign. The secret of Chase's interest lay in the fact that Hooker had pledged himself not to become a candidate for the Presidency, should he win a great victory. Meanwhile, as he was not to be allowed to fight, both Halleck and Lincoln refused his sensible proposition to cross the Rappahannock, and Lincoln wrote him the
Old Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 16
tation. Ewell in Valley. captured property. Hooker moves. Lincoln suggests. Lee in Valley. Stuper. Hill's corps now stood alone in front of Hooker's entire army. Meanwhile, Hooker had sent Bpeper, and Hill still opposite Fredericksburg, Hooker put his army in motion from Falmouth for Manast began crossing at Williamsport on the 24th. Hooker was not far behind, for he crossed at Edward'sh, and, at the same time, covered Washington. Hooker had, meanwhile, been placed in command of the se order, but under the policy of not allowing Hooker to fight, it was but a sham, as he soon discovpense has been incurred in fortifying them. Hooker appealed in vain to Stanton and Lincoln, pointth Hooker still in command. Meade succeeded Hooker. He was an excellent fighter, but too lackines away, to deliver the order superseding him. Hooker had hoped for a different outcome. He acquiesee, therefore, on June 28, still believed that Hooker's army had not yet crossed the Potomac, and, t[29 more...]
rt, Bartlett, Russell SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill 15,710NewtonShaler, Eustis, Wheaton848 11th CorpsBarlowVon Gilsa, Ames HowardSteinwehrCoster, Smith 10,576SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski526 12th CorpsWilliamsMcDougall, Lockwood, Ruger Slocums division, on his left flank, coining in from Middletown. About the same time, also, the head of the 11th corps, under Howard, arrived at Gettysburg, and Howard succeeded Reynolds in command of the field. He halted Steinwehr's division, two brigaHoward succeeded Reynolds in command of the field. He halted Steinwehr's division, two brigades, on Cemetery Hill, as a reserve, and advanced Schurz and Barlow to the front. With these he formed line to cover the approaches from the north as far east as Rock Creek. This disposition was bad. The force was small for so long a line, and its mmitsburg and Taneytown roads and the Baltimore Turnpike, was already partially occupied on my arrival by direction of Gen. Howard. Some difficulty was experienced in forming the troops of the 11th corps, but by vigorous efforts a sufficiently form
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 16
ker moves. Lincoln suggests. Lee in Valley. Stuart proposes raid. conditional consent. Stuart'sed than tooters. It has already been said that Stuart would have made a more active and efficient col's and Ames's brigades of infantry, to attack Stuart's camps near the Rappahannock. A severe cavalbrigades, with loss of three guns and 907 men. Stuart's loss was 485. On June 10, Ewell's corps lgstreet drew near the Potomac, ready to cross, Stuart made to Lee a very unwise proposition, which Lof Gettysburg, 25 miles off to the southwest. Stuart's report says:— After as little rest as waer implied rebuke, and it was so understood by Stuart. He, however, is scarcely to be blamed for bout Hancock. A very essential part, also, of Stuart's proposed programme had not been carried out.e Commander-in-Chief. To gain information, Stuart had designed to have two efficient scouts operavorably for the Confederates' strategy. Now, Stuart was still unheard from, Robertson and Imboden [14 more...]
am, Ward, De Trobriand Sickles 12,630HumphreysCarr, Brewster, Burling530 5th CorpsBarnesTilton, Sweitzer, Vincent SykesAyresDay, Burbank, Weed 12,211CrawfordMcCandless, Fisher526 6th CorpsWrightTorbert, Bartlett, Russell SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill 15,710NewtonShaler, Eustis, Wheaton848 11th CorpsBarlowVon Gilsa, Ames HowardSteinwehrCoster, Smith 10,576SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski526 12th CorpsWilliamsMcDougall, Lockwood, Ruger Slocum 8,597GearyCandy, Cobham, Greene420 2,568TylerArtillery Reserve21110 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY 2,580Engineers, Provost Guard's Escorts 100,2837 Corps, 19 Divisions, 51 Brigades, Infantry and Artillery58312 Cavalry Corps Pleasonton 14,973Buford Gregg, D. KilpatrickGamble, Devin, Merritt McIntosh, Huey, Gregg, J. Farnsworth, Custer950 115,2568 Corps, 22 Divisions, 59 Brigades67362 The Confederate infantry by this time were about nine-tenths armed with the rifled musket, muzzle loading, mostly of calibre .58, but
s remained in Va. until brought over by Lee's order on July 2. This failure to carry out Lee's orders indicates a staff insufficient to keep him in touch with what was taking place. A notable feature of the coming battle will be found in the number of important events which seemed to happen without any control for the Commander-in-Chief. To gain information, Stuart had designed to have two efficient scouts operating within the enemy's line, but accident had prevented in both cases. Mosby, one of them, had failed to reach Stuart, at his crossing of the Potomac, owing to an enforced change of Stuart's line of march. Stringfellow, the other, had been captured. Lee, therefore, on June 28, still believed that Hooker's army had not yet crossed the Potomac, and, to hurry Hooker up, he issued orders for an advance, the next day, of all his forces upon Harrisburg. But there was still one scout, Harrison, within the Federal lines. Longstreet had despatched him from Culpeper, thr
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