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Emmitsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
at Ewell's corps was between York and Carlisle, and, on the 29th, put his whole army in motion in that direction, encamping that night on a line extending from Emmitsburg to Westminster. On the 30th, his advanced corps moved forward within a few miles of Gettysburg on his left, to Littletown in the centre, and toward Manchester dvance of each of his seven corps, as follows: The 5th corps was ordered to Hanover; the 6th corps to Manchester; the 12th corps to Two Taverns; the 3d corps to Emmitsburg, and the 1st and 11th corps to Gettysburg. These advances were not intended to bring on a battle, but to cover the position selected, allowing space in frontf Buford was occupying a firm position on the plain to the left of Gettysburg, covering the rear of the retreating corps. The 3d corps had not yet arrived from Emmitsburg. Orders were at once given to establish a line of battle on Cemetery Hill with skirmishers occupying that part of the town immediately in our front. The posit
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 16
ps. The general artillery reserve, which had been commanded by Pendleton, was broken up, on the organization of the 3d corps, and it was never reestablished. Pendleton, however, was retained as chief of artillery. It is worthy of note that this artillery organization of a few batteries with each division, and a reserve with each corps, but with no general reserve for the army, was the first of the kind ever adopted by any foreign army, and that it was subsequently copied by Prussia and Austria after 1866, and by France after 1870, and later by England. But, although our reserve under Pendleton had never found the opportunity to render much service, its being discontinued was due to our poverty of guns, not to dissatisfaction with the system. And the fine service at Gettysburg by the Federal reserve of 110 guns, under Hunt, would seem to demonstrate the advantage of such an organization in every large army. On Wednesday, June 3, Lee began the delicate operation of manoeuvrin
Alexandria (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
dition that Longstreet could spare the cavalry from his front, and approved the adventure. Longstreet, thus suddenly called on to decide the question, seems not to have appreciated its importance, for he decided it on the imaginary ground that the passage of the Potomac by our rear would, in a measure, disclose our plans. Accordingly, about midnight of June 24, Stuart, with Hampton's, W. H. F. Lee's, and Fitz-Lee's brigades, six guns, and some ambulances, marched from Salem, for the Potomac River. Making a circuit by Brentsville, Wolf Run shoals, Fairfax C. H., and Dranesville, he crossed the Potomac at Rowser's Ford at midnight of the 27th, about 80 miles by the route travelled. The ford was barely passable. The water came on the saddles of the horses and entirely submerged the artillery carriages. These were emptied and the ammunition carried across by hand. Here the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal was cut. Next morning at Rockville, a train of wagons eight miles long was captur
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
June 10, Ewell's corps left Culpeper for the Valley. Rodes moved to Berryville, while Early and Johnson advanced upon Winchester, and, on the 13th and 14th, drove Milroy's forces into the city. Preparations were made to storm the fortified line atecured, compare well with the work of the same corps under Jackson 13 months before. Early and Johnson, advancing upon Winchester, made 70 miles in three days. Rodes speaks of his march to Williamsport as— the most trying march we had yet had; me no difficulty in establishing claims and receiving payment at fair prices. On June 13, as Ewell's corps approached Winchester, Longstreet being at Culpeper, and Hill still opposite Fredericksburg, Hooker put his army in motion from Falmouth for rched from Culpeper to take position east of the Blue Ridge, while Hill passed in his rear and crossed the mountains to Winchester via Front Royal. When Hill was safely in the Valley, Longstreet also entered through Ashby's and Snicker's gaps, and a
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ld have occupied some strong position between Cashtown and Gettysburg, and the onus of attack would ts which would concentrate the three corps at Cashtown, eight miles west of Gettysburg. There was division followed Heth's from Fayetteville to Cashtown, and was followed by Longstreet with Hood andived the orders from Lee, also marched toward Cashtown, the place of rendezvous. Meanwhile, Pettiee corps were converging by easy marches upon Cashtown, near which village he proposed to select his describes how it began: — On arriving at Cashtown, Heth, who had sent forward Pettigrew's brigaint from the roads they were pursuing, toward Cashtown. Unfortunately, six of the divisions, and thllowing Heth and Pender, who had marched from Cashtown at 5 A. M., and become engaged at Gettysburg street's orders had been only to go as far as Cashtown, but later orders were sent for all troops toat Lee was withdrawing and concentrating near Cashtown. He wrongly ascribed this to his own advance[3 more...]
Two Taverns (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
not know that Meade had moved at all, and his own movement eastward was really inspired by apprehension for his own communications, aroused by Hooker's action before he had been superseded. Although Meade had selected his proposed line of battle behind Pipe Creek, and now announced his intention to rest his troops, he still, on the 1st, ordered a further advance of each of his seven corps, as follows: The 5th corps was ordered to Hanover; the 6th corps to Manchester; the 12th corps to Two Taverns; the 3d corps to Emmitsburg, and the 1st and 11th corps to Gettysburg. These advances were not intended to bring on a battle, but to cover the position selected, allowing space in front to delay the enemy's approach and give time for preparation. The instructions to Reynolds, who was in command on the left, were not to bring on a general engagement. But, though both Meade and Lee had cautioned their lieutenants to this effect, it was precipitated by Hill's initiative and Reynolds's
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Lee himself had used with Pope in Aug., 1862. On June 29, Hill moved Heth's division from Fayetteville to Cashtown, about 10 miles. Heth heard that shoes could be purchased in Gettysburg, and, witigade to go there next day and get them. On the 30th, Pender's division followed Heth's from Fayetteville to Cashtown, and was followed by Longstreet with Hood and McLaws from Chambersburg as far as rigade was detached from Hood's division and sent to New Guilford C. H., a few miles south of Fayetteville, until Robertson's cavalry should relieve it. On the 30th, Ewell's corps, having received thetrains and the reserve artillery of all three corps, were concentrated upon the turnpike from Fayetteville to Gettysburg. Anderson's division, followed by the 3d corps trains, had started soon after daylight from Fayetteville. Here they had halted, but Lee, passing, had ordered them on to Gettysburg, following Heth and Pender, who had marched from Cashtown at 5 A. M., and become engaged at Getty
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
, passing between his main body and Washington, and cross into Md., joining our army north of the Potomac. The commanding general wrote authorizing this move, if I thought it practicable, and also what instructions should be given the two brigades left in front of the enemy. He also notified me that one column would move via Gettysburg, and the other via Carlisle, toward the Susquehanna, and directed me, after crossing, to proceed with all despatch to join the right (Early) of the army in Pa. In view of the issues at stake, and of the fact that already he had been deprived of two promised brigades (Corse's and Jenkins's), it was unwise even to contemplate sending three brigades of cavalry upon such distant service. When one compares the small beneficial results of raids, even when successful, with tile risks here involved, it is hard to understand how Lee could have given his consent. Hooker's Chancellorsville campaign had been lost by the absence of his cavalry, and Lee's
Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
of the field. He halted Steinwehr's division, two brigades, on Cemetery Hill, as a reserve, and advanced Schurz and Barlow to the front. Wirg. Orders were at once given to establish a line of battle on Cemetery Hill with skirmishers occupying that part of the town immediately inrce enough at hand, to follow the pursuit and at least to carry Cemetery Hill, from which one of the two reserve brigades, Coster's, had been Ridge, and seen the defeat of the enemy and their retreat over Cemetery Hill. His first impulse was to have the pursuit pushed and he sent ernoon Lee rode forward to arrange a renewal of the attack upon Cemetery Hill from the town at daylight next morning. He held a long confere, nearly straight, for about two miles from Little Round Top to Cemetery Hill, where the bend began. The bend was not uniform and regular, s Hill, and pass around it nearly in an S. This salient upon Cemetery Hill offered the only hopeful point of attack upon the enemy's entir
France (France) (search for this): chapter 16
ry reserve, which had been commanded by Pendleton, was broken up, on the organization of the 3d corps, and it was never reestablished. Pendleton, however, was retained as chief of artillery. It is worthy of note that this artillery organization of a few batteries with each division, and a reserve with each corps, but with no general reserve for the army, was the first of the kind ever adopted by any foreign army, and that it was subsequently copied by Prussia and Austria after 1866, and by France after 1870, and later by England. But, although our reserve under Pendleton had never found the opportunity to render much service, its being discontinued was due to our poverty of guns, not to dissatisfaction with the system. And the fine service at Gettysburg by the Federal reserve of 110 guns, under Hunt, would seem to demonstrate the advantage of such an organization in every large army. On Wednesday, June 3, Lee began the delicate operation of manoeuvring Hooker out of his positio
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