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York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
He did not take the War Dept. into his confidence at first, hoping to accomplish his purpose by gradual suggestion and request. The process was too slow, and the result was unfortunate. Only on June 23 from Berryville, Va., did he fully explain to the President his wishes. On the 25th, from Williamsport, he followed the matter up with two letters, urging the organization of an army, even in effigy, under Beauregard, at Culpeper C. H. Meanwhile, some demonstrations by the enemy from the York River had excited apprehensions at Richmond, and neither Corse's or Jenkins's brigades were sent forward, as had been planned. A reply was despatched on June 29, saying,— This is the first intimation the President has had that such a plan was ever in contemplation, and, taking all things into consideration, he cannot see how it can by any possibility be carried into effect. Explaining the difficulty of protecting the railroads near Richmond, the letter even suggested that Lee spare s
nry, Walton, Alexander2184 Totals21,231 11 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 2D corps. Ewell Early6,943 Hays, Smith, Hoke, Gordon Johnson5,564 Stuart, Walker, Nichols, Jones Rodes8,454 Daniel, Doles, Iverson, Ramseur, O'Neal Arty. Battns.1,000 Jones, Latimer, Carter, Brown, Nelson2184 Totals21,961 13 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 3D corps. A. P. Hill Anderson7,440Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Perry, Posey Heth7,500Pettigrew, Brockenbrough, Archer, Davis Pender6,800Perrin, Lane, Thomas, Scales Arty. Battns.1,000Lane, Garnett, Poague, McIntosh, Pegram2080 Totals22,740 13 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2080 65,932 3 Corps, 9 Divisions, 37 Brigades, 15 Battns. Arty.62248 Stuart Cavalry10,292 Hampton, Robertson, Jones, F. Lee, Jenkins, W. H. F. Lee Imboden 1 Battn. Arty.624 Totals10,292 1 Division, 7 Brigades624 Aggregate76,22413 Corps, 10 Divisions, 44 Brigades, L6 Battns. Arty.68272 The figures given are the returns of the Officers and men present for duty on May 31
e conduct of a battle. He could not be at once removed on account of the support of politicians who desired to have Secretary Chase succeed Mr. Lincoln as President. This party, with the active aid of Chase, had placed Hooker in his position by tuChase, had placed Hooker in his position by turning the scale in his favor, when the choice was between Hooker and Meade, as successor to Burnside. They still supported Hooker strongly, and a dead-lock was only averted by Chase's friends consenting to a change of the commander in case Hooker sChase's friends consenting to a change of the commander in case Hooker should voluntarily resign. The secret of Chase's interest lay in the fact that Hooker had pledged himself not to become a candidate for the Presidency, should he win a great victory. Meanwhile, as he was not to be allowed to fight, both HalleckChase's interest lay in the fact that Hooker had pledged himself not to become a candidate for the Presidency, should he win a great victory. Meanwhile, as he was not to be allowed to fight, both Halleck and Lincoln refused his sensible proposition to cross the Rappahannock, and Lincoln wrote him the oft-quoted advice,— not to be entangled on the river, like an ox jumped half over a fence, and liable to be torn by dogs, front and rear, without
June 30, 1863 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1st CorpsWadsworth Meredith, Cutler ReynoldsRobinsonPaul, Baxter 10,355RowleyBiddle, Stone, Stannard523 2d CorpsCaldwellCross, Kelley, Zook, Brook HancockGibbonHarrow, Webb, Hall 13,056HaysCarroll, Smyth, Willard524 3d CorpsBirneyGraham, Ward, De Trobriand Sickles 12,630HumphreysCarr, Brewster, Burling530 5th CorpsBarnesTilton, Sweitzer, Vincent SykesAyresDay, Burbank, Weed 12,211CrawfordMcCandless, Fisher526 6th Cy protected the left flank of the Federals. As Buford withdrew, Wadsworth's two brigades became engaged with Davis and Archer. Davis, on the left, overlapped Cutler on the Federal right and, of course, soon drove back his right wing along with Hall's battery, all of which were withdrawn without severe loss. But, on the Confederate right, Archer's brigade was overlapped by Meredith's, which struck it on the flank and captured Archer and several hundred prisoners. This blow to Archer relieved
operating within the enemy's line, but accident had prevented in both cases. Mosby, one of them, had failed to reach Stuart, at his crossing of the Potomac, owing to an enforced change of Stuart's line of march. Stringfellow, the other, had been captured. Lee, therefore, on June 28, still believed that Hooker's army had not yet crossed the Potomac, and, to hurry Hooker up, he issued orders for an advance, the next day, of all his forces upon Harrisburg. But there was still one scout, Harrison, within the Federal lines. Longstreet had despatched him from Culpeper, three weeks before, to go into Washington and remain until he had important information to communicate. With good judgment and good fortune he appeared about midnight on the 28th, with the news that Hooker had crossed the Potomac, and had been superseded by Meade. He was also able to give the approximate locations of five of Meade's seven corps, three being near Frederick and two near the base of South Mountain.
y and Artillery and 15 per cent for Cavalry. Army of the Potomac. Present for duty, June 30, 1863 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1st CorpsWadsworth Meredith, Cutler ReynoldsRobinsonPaul, Baxter 10,355RowleyBiddle, Stone, Stannard523 2d CorpsCaldwellCross, Kelley, Zook, Brook HancockGibbonHarrow, Webb, Hall 13,056HaysCarroll, Smyth, Willard524 3d CorpsBirneyGraham, Ward, De Trobriand Sickles 12,630HumphreysCarr, Brewster, Burling530 5th CorpsBarnesTilton, Sweitzer, Vincent SykesAyresDay, Burbank, Weed 12,211CrawfordMcCandless, Fisher526 6th CorpsWrightTorbert, Bartlett, Russell SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill 15,710NewtonShaler, Eustis, Wheaton848 11th CorpsBarlowVon Gilsa, Ames HowardSteinwehrCoster, Smith 10,576SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski526 12th CorpsWilliamsMcDougall, Lockwood, Ruger Slocum 8,597GearyCandy, Cobham, Greene420 2,568TylerArtillery Reserve21110 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY 2,580Engineers, Provost Guard's
d by an official indorsement placed upon the application of a soldier to be transferred from the infantry to the band. Respectfully forwarded, disapproved. Shooters are more needed than tooters. It has already been said that Stuart would have made a more active and efficient corps commander than Ewell. Reorganized, the army stood as follows: — 1ST corps. Longstreet DIVISIONSSTRENGTHBRIGADE COMMANDERBATTS.guns McLaws7,311 Kershaw, Barksdale, Semmes, Wofford Pickett5,200 Garnett, Kemper, Armistead Hood7,720 Law, Robertson, Anderson, G. T. Benning Arty. Battns.1,000 Cabell, Dearing, Henry, Walton, Alexander2184 Totals21,231 11 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 2D corps. Ewell Early6,943 Hays, Smith, Hoke, Gordon Johnson5,564 Stuart, Walker, Nichols, Jones Rodes8,454 Daniel, Doles, Iverson, Ramseur, O'Neal Arty. Battns.1,000 Jones, Latimer, Carter, Brown, Nelson2184 Totals21,961 13 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 3D corps. A. P. Hill Anderson7,440Wilcox, Wr
D. R. Jones (search for this): chapter 16
, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 2D corps. Ewell Early6,943 Hays, Smith, Hoke, Gordon Johnson5,564 Stuart, Walker, Nichols, Jones Rodes8,454 Daniel, Doles, Iverson, Ramseur, O'Neal Arty. Battns.1,000 Jones, Latimer, Carter, Brown, Nelson2184 TotalJones, Latimer, Carter, Brown, Nelson2184 Totals21,961 13 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 3D corps. A. P. Hill Anderson7,440Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Perry, Posey Heth7,500Pettigrew, Brockenbrough, Archer, Davis Pender6,800Perrin, Lane, Thomas, Scales Arty. Battns.1,000Lane, Garnett, Poas. Arty.2080 65,932 3 Corps, 9 Divisions, 37 Brigades, 15 Battns. Arty.62248 Stuart Cavalry10,292 Hampton, Robertson, Jones, F. Lee, Jenkins, W. H. F. Lee Imboden 1 Battn. Arty.624 Totals10,292 1 Division, 7 Brigades624 Aggregate76,22413 Corps brigade be one of these, with Hampton in command of both. This was not convenient, and Stuart had left Robertson's and Jones's brigades, with Robertson in command. Also, he had failed to make Robertson understand what was expected of him. The re
corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1st CorpsWadsworth Meredith, Cutler ReynoldsRobinsonPaul, Baxter 10,355RowleyBiddle, Stone, Stannard523 2d CorpsCaldwellCross, Kelley, Zook, Brook HancockGibbonHarrow, Webb, Hall 13,056HaysCarroll, Smyth, Willard524 3d CorpsBirneyGraham, Ward, De Trobriand Sickles 12,630HumphreysCarr, Brewster, Burling530 5th CorpsBarnesTilton, Sweitzer, Vincent SykesAyresDay, Burbank, Weed 12,211CrawfordMcCandless, Fisher526 6th CorpsWrightTorbert, Bartlett, Russell SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill 15,710NewtonShaler, Eustis, Wheaton848 11th CorpsBarlowVon Gilsa, Ames HowardSteinwehrCoster, Smith 10,576SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski526 12th CorpsWilliamsMcDougall, Lockwood, Ruger Slocum 8,597GearyCandy, Cobham, Greene420 2,568TylerArtillery Reserve21110 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY 2,580Engineers, Provost Guard's Escorts 100,2837 Corps, 19 Divisions, 51 Brigades, Infantry and Artillery58312 Cavalry Corps Pleas
rces actually engaged, deductions must be made from these figures in both armies for sick, guards, and details. This deduction Livermore averages at seven per cent for Infantry and Artillery and 15 per cent for Cavalry. Army of the Potomac. Present for duty, June 30, 1863 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1st CorpsWadsworth Meredith, Cutler ReynoldsRobinsonPaul, Baxter 10,355RowleyBiddle, Stone, Stannard523 2d CorpsCaldwellCross, Kelley, Zook, Brook HancockGibbonHarrow, Webb, Hall 13,056HaysCarroll, Smyth, Willard524 3d CorpsBirneyGraham, Ward, De Trobriand Sickles 12,630HumphreysCarr, Brewster, Burling530 5th CorpsBarnesTilton, Sweitzer, Vincent SykesAyresDay, Burbank, Weed 12,211CrawfordMcCandless, Fisher526 6th CorpsWrightTorbert, Bartlett, Russell SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill 15,710NewtonShaler, Eustis, Wheaton848 11th CorpsBarlowVon Gilsa, Ames HowardSteinwehrCoster, Smith 10,576SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski526 12th CorpsWilliamsMcDoug
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