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Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
s staff, and late in the forenoon of May 6 we were at Barhamsville, and the greater part of the army was halted and resting in the vicinity. It had been a special feature of McClellan's strategy that on our retreat from Yorktown we should be intercepted at Eltham's landing by a large force. But our battle at Williamsburg had proved a double victory, for it had prevented Franklin's division from being reenforced so as to be either formidable or aggressive. It arrived at the mouth of the Pamunkey at 5 P. M. on the 6th. During the night it disembarked and next morning reconnoitred its vicinity and took a defensive position, sending Newton's and Slocum's brigades through a large wood to examine the country beyond. On the far edge of that wood about 9 A. M. their skirmishers ran into those of Hood's and Hampton's brigades of Whiting's division, which were there to see that our trains passed without interruption. The Federals fell back and were followed until they were under the
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Chapter 4: Yorktown and Williamsburg McClellan at Fortress Monroe. Johnston goes to Yorktown. reorganization. em loaded and despatched. But the fighting next day at Williamsburg proved so severe that he rode to the front and had both divisions to follow him. Near Williamsburg, Magruder had, some months before, selected a line of battle across the Penind Fort Magruder. As the rear of our column came into Williamsburg during the afternoon of the 4th, the enemy's cavalry sues of Longstreet's division. That night we stayed at Williamsburg, and it poured rain all night. About 2 A. M. the leadiy water to West Point. To hold the enemy in check at Williamsburg, Longstreet retained his whole division of six brigades H. Hill, which had only advanced a short distance from Williamsburg, was brought back as a reserve. One of its brigades, Ers. As far as possible the wounded were brought into Williamsburg, and soon after dark our march was resumed over roads n
G. W. Smith (search for this): chapter 4
He advocated its abandonment, and the concentration at Richmond of all forces from Virginia to Georgia. With these McClellan's force should be attacked when it came near Richmond. A conference was called, which included Lee, Longstreet, G. W. Smith, and the Sec. of War, Randolph. It was advocated by Lee, and finally determined, that Johnston should risk making all the delay possible at Yorktown. This was a safe conclusion to reach, only in view of the cautiousness of McClellan. Johnston had already begun sending some reenforcements to Magruder, and had brought a large part of his army near Richmond. About Apr. 15 he went to Yorktown, taking Smith's and Longstreet's divisions, which gave him a total force of 55,633. In the whole course of the war there was little service as trying as that in the Yorktown lines. There was much rain and the country was low and flat, so that the trenches were badly drained and would frequently be flooded with water. The general flatness
approved, but referred the question to Johnston. Johnston, who had left the battle entirely to Longstreet's direction, referred it to the latter. Longstreet very properly refused to give permission, as we fought only to cover our retreat up the Peninsula, and it was assured. But this message taken to Hill did not satisfy him. He was a brother-in-law of Stonewall Jackson and was a soldier of the same type. He visited Longstreet in person, and Longstreet now weakly yielded to his appeal. Rains's brigade had meanwhile been brought up behind Early's, and it would have been possible to organize an attack which might have routed Hancock. But Hill, to lose no time, began the formation of the four regiments for the charge. The distance to be traversed was over half a mile, much of it wood and swamp. Hill placed the four regiments in a line of battle extending through a wood, with Early leading the two left regiments, while he led the two right. But Early mistook one of Hill's comman
ould swarm in to help the jaded horses pull the vehicle out. Meanwhile, everything in the rear must halt and wait, and so it went on all night —a march of one or two minutes, and halt for no one could guess how long. The average time made by the column was under a mile an hour. Our movement was not discovered by the enemy until after daylight on the 4th. His cavalry was at once started in pursuit, and these were followed during the day by five divisions of infantry under Smith, Hooker, Kearney, Couch, and Casey, the whole under command of Sumner. Besides these, Franklin's division was loaded upon transports during the day, and early on the 6th sailed up the York to intercept us near West Point. Two other divisions, Sedgwick's and Richardson's, were also to have been sent by water, and McClellan remained in Yorktown to see them loaded and despatched. But the fighting next day at Williamsburg proved so severe that he rode to the front and had both divisions to follow him. Near
rm in to help the jaded horses pull the vehicle out. Meanwhile, everything in the rear must halt and wait, and so it went on all night —a march of one or two minutes, and halt for no one could guess how long. The average time made by the column was under a mile an hour. Our movement was not discovered by the enemy until after daylight on the 4th. His cavalry was at once started in pursuit, and these were followed during the day by five divisions of infantry under Smith, Hooker, Kearney, Couch, and Casey, the whole under command of Sumner. Besides these, Franklin's division was loaded upon transports during the day, and early on the 6th sailed up the York to intercept us near West Point. Two other divisions, Sedgwick's and Richardson's, were also to have been sent by water, and McClellan remained in Yorktown to see them loaded and despatched. But the fighting next day at Williamsburg proved so severe that he rode to the front and had both divisions to follow him. Near William
retreat from Yorktown. battle of Williamsburg. Early's attack. Hancock's report. casualties. Eltham's Landing. In the latter part ofrfluous aggressiveness. On the extreme right of the Federals, Gen. Hancock had discovered some vacant intrenchments — part of Magruder's olate lines. Early, on lower ground and in the woods, could not see Hancock's position, but suggested an attack to Hill. Hill approved, but rd have been possible to organize an attack which might have routed Hancock. But Hill, to lose no time, began the formation of the four regimgenerally until within 150 yards of the enemy. A large portion of Hancock's infantry lay concealed behind the crest of the ridge until the ting over the crest and continuing the fire for 15 or 20 rounds. Hancock says in his official report: — The plunging fire from the redofifty per cent of its members, but no official report was made. Hancock reported his losses in the affair as: killed 10, wounded 88, missi
the afternoon of the 4th, the enemy's cavalry suddenly appeared so near to this fort, that Sommes's tired infantry brigade had to be taken back at the double quick to occupy it, and a sharp skirmish was fought before sundown. McLaws reenforced Semmes with Kershaw and two batteries, and we captured one of the enemy's guns, stuck in the mud, ten horses being unable to get it off. After dark Kershaw and Semmes were relieved by Anderson's and Pryor's brigades of Longstreet's division. That nigSemmes were relieved by Anderson's and Pryor's brigades of Longstreet's division. That night we stayed at Williamsburg, and it poured rain all night. About 2 A. M. the leading divisions were pushed forward. Johnston was anxious to get his troops ahead to meet the forces he expected McClellan to send by water to West Point. To hold the enemy in check at Williamsburg, Longstreet retained his whole division of six brigades as a rear-guard. Soon after daylight on the 5th, the enemy developed their presence before Pryor and Anderson. Hooker's and Smith's Federal divisions had reach
S. C. Kershaw (search for this): chapter 4
n of the 4th, the enemy's cavalry suddenly appeared so near to this fort, that Sommes's tired infantry brigade had to be taken back at the double quick to occupy it, and a sharp skirmish was fought before sundown. McLaws reenforced Semmes with Kershaw and two batteries, and we captured one of the enemy's guns, stuck in the mud, ten horses being unable to get it off. After dark Kershaw and Semmes were relieved by Anderson's and Pryor's brigades of Longstreet's division. That night we stayedKershaw and Semmes were relieved by Anderson's and Pryor's brigades of Longstreet's division. That night we stayed at Williamsburg, and it poured rain all night. About 2 A. M. the leading divisions were pushed forward. Johnston was anxious to get his troops ahead to meet the forces he expected McClellan to send by water to West Point. To hold the enemy in check at Williamsburg, Longstreet retained his whole division of six brigades as a rear-guard. Soon after daylight on the 5th, the enemy developed their presence before Pryor and Anderson. Hooker's and Smith's Federal divisions had reached the fiel
of attempting to pass the position by main force. Meanwhile, Johnston had been summoned to Richmond, and had advised Davis that a defence of Yorktown involved great risk, and at best could gain no important result. He advocated its abandonment, and the concentration at Richmond of all forces from Virginia to Georgia. With these McClellan's force should be attacked when it came near Richmond. A conference was called, which included Lee, Longstreet, G. W. Smith, and the Sec. of War, Randolph. It was advocated by Lee, and finally determined, that Johnston should risk making all the delay possible at Yorktown. This was a safe conclusion to reach, only in view of the cautiousness of McClellan. Johnston had already begun sending some reenforcements to Magruder, and had brought a large part of his army near Richmond. About Apr. 15 he went to Yorktown, taking Smith's and Longstreet's divisions, which gave him a total force of 55,633. In the whole course of the war there was
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