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Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
under my immediate command in the field, and that of General A. J. Smith's three divisions, which had been ordered from Missouri to join the forces of General Thomas. In his entire department, excluding the Fourth and Twenty-third corps in the fielit on that point: Two divisions of infantry, under Major-General A. J. Smith, were reported on their way to join me from Missouri, which, with several one-year regiments then arriving in the department, and detachments collected from points of minor , Vol. II, pp. 162, 163. at about 45,000 (exclusive of the Fourth and Twentythird corps, and Smith's corps coming from Missouri), in which he included about 8000 or 10,000 new troops at Nashville, and the same number of civil employees of the quartthink, be admitted as beyond question that, in view of his daily expectation of the arrival of A. J. Smith's troops from Missouri, Thomas was perfectly right in not acting upon Sherman's suggestion of extreme defensive action, and thus abandoning his
Williamsport (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ce, or wait until Wilson can organize his entire cavalry force, and then withdraw from your present position. Should Hood then cross river, we can surely ruin him. You may have fords at Centreville, Bean's [Beard's] Ferry, Gordon's Ferry, and Williamsport thoroughly obstructed by filling up all the roads leading from them with trees, and then replace your infantry by cavalry. Send an intelligent staff officer to see that the work is properly done. As soon as relieved, concentrate your infantrmy's movements. I desire you to fall back from Columbia and take up your position at Franklin, leaving a sufficient force at Spring Hill to contest the enemy's progress until you are securely posted at Franklin. The troops at the fords below Williamsport, etc., will be withdrawn and take up a position behind Franklin. General A. J. Smith's command has not yet reached Nashville; as soon as he arrives I will make immediate disposition of his troops and notify you of the same. Please send me a
Brentwood, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ecessity to retain him here, will send him to Franklin or Brentwood, according to circumstances. If you can prevent Hood fropon, in the following telegram, dated 3 P. M., I proposed Brentwood as a point where A. J. Smith's and all the other troops cchief. It appears to me that I ought to take position at Brentwood at once. If A. J. Smith's division and the Murfreesboroasoon afterward: Please send A. J. Smith's division to Brentwood early tomor-row morning. Also please send to Brentwood tBrentwood to-morrow morning 1,000,000 rounds infantry ammunition, 2000 rounds 3-inch, and 1000 rounds light twelve artillery. In repce at once, and hold your troops in readiness to march to Brentwood, and thence to this place, as soon as your trains are fai back and the preparations made for the army to retire to Brentwood, the troops to commence withdrawing from the line on the . When he arrives I will start General A. J. Smith's command and General Steedman's troops to your assistance at Brentwood.
Lynnville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
against it throw his forces on to the pike north of us, and thus cut us off from Columbia and from our reinforcements. Lynnville would be free from these objections as a point of concentration for our forces. On the other hand, a force at this poi a brigade in the inclosed works at this place could hold out against any force until relieved, while the main force at Lynnville would be sure of concentrating with the troops still in rear. I respectfully submit these views for your consideration week or ten days, you are authorized to leave a brigade or a division there, and concentrate the rest of your force at Lynnville preparatory to support Hatch, or fall back on Columbia, whichever may be necessary. Part of Ruger's troops will start g. His movements will indicate to you what disposition you should make—whether to concentrate at Columbia or remain at Lynnville. If Hood's entire army should advance, you must use your own discretion as to holding the fortifications at Pulaski o
Harpeth River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ng back the enemy, should it prove true that he has crossed the river, you will necessarily have to make preparation to take up a new position at Franklin, behind Harpeth, [while] immediately, if it become necessary to fall back. (Signed) Geo. H. Thomas, Major-General, Commanding. The records of the Department of the Cumberla thus learned, a short time after eight o'clock on the morning of the 29th, that A. J. Smith had not yet arrived at Nashville, and that the position behind the Harpeth River at Franklin was that to which I must retire when compelled to fall back. (Another despatch from Thomas, dated November 28, 10 A. M., appears in the records,ter of that situation had been due largely to Thomas's action in leaving me without the expected reinforcements, and in not providing the means of crossing the Harpeth River. The following seems to show that General Thomas did not even then see the importance of prompt concentration of all his available force in front of the ene
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 11
ays at Franklin. I will now add to the foregoing sketch what seems to me necessary to a full understanding of the operations preceding and immediately following the battle of Franklin, referring briefly, as necessary to an exact understanding of some things that occurred, to the relation in which I stood to General Thomas. He was my senior by thirteen years as a graduate of the Military Academy, where I had known him well as my highly respected instructor. He had won high distinction in Mexico, and had been twice brevetted for gallant services in that war. He had seen far more service in the field than I had, and in much larger commands, though almost always under the immediate command of a superior— Buell, Rosecrans, and Sherman. Even in the Atlanta campaign, then recently ended, his command was nearly five times as large as mine. In 1864 he had already become a brigadier-general in the regular army, having risen to that rank by regular stages, while I was only a captain thirty
Centreville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
d across Duck River, and fall upon him with our whole force, or wait until Wilson can organize his entire cavalry force, and then withdraw from your present position. Should Hood then cross river, we can surely ruin him. You may have fords at Centreville, Bean's [Beard's] Ferry, Gordon's Ferry, and Williamsport thoroughly obstructed by filling up all the roads leading from them with trees, and then replace your infantry by cavalry. Send an intelligent staff officer to see that the work is properly done. As soon as relieved, concentrate your infantry; the cavalry will be able to retard, if not prevent, Hood's crossing, after the roads are thoroughly obstructed, if they do their duty. The road leading from Centreville to Nashville should be thoroughly obstructed. I am not sure but it would be a good plan to invite Hood across Duck River if we can get him to move toward Clarksville. Is there no convenience for unloading beyond Thompson's Station? Geo. H. Thomas, Major-General, C
Rutherford Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
e impression upon my mind that Hood's movement was so rapid or energetic as to prevent me from doing what seemed of such vital importance. Therefore I decided not to yield my position unless compelled by force to do so. While considering this question I had detained one of Stanley's two divisions (Kimball's), and had suspended the orders for Ruger's division to march to Spring Hill. When the decision was reached, I put Kimball's and Wood's divisions in position between Duck River and Rutherford's Creek, and Ruger's north of that creek, to resist any attempt the enemy might make upon our position. I then sent the following to Stanley at Spring Hill: near Columbia, Tenn., November 29, 1864, 10:45 A. M. Major-General Stanley, Commanding Fourth Army Corps. General: General Wood's reconnoissance shows a considerable force, at least, on this side of the river. I have halted Kimball's division this side of the creek and put it in position. I will try to hold the enemy until d
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
o report with the Twenty-third Corps to General Thomas in Tennessee, I felt in the fullest degree all the deference and respety in years and rank and services. When I went back to Tennessee my only anxiety respecting the situation, so far as Generrom this statement of troops available for service in middle Tennessee those in Kentucky and East Tennessee, belonging to tEast Tennessee, belonging to the Department of the Ohio, for the reason that just at that time unusual demand was made upon those troops for service in EaEast Tennessee, where some of the State forces had met with disaster. This probably accounts in part for the discrepancies inassume the offensive. Hood's force was ready to invade Tennessee in one compact army, while Thomas then had in the field or capture of nearly everything in the rear, not only in Tennessee, but also in Kentucky, except perhaps Nashville and Chatt, part i, p. 33. Some of these troops had been sent to East Tennessee, as well as all the mounted troops available in Kentuc
Thompson's Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
but believe it was absolute. I will explain fully in time. Reinforcements will have to march from Spring Hill or Thompson's Station. Supplies should be sent to Thompson's Station. After withdrawing to the north bank of Duck River I telegrapheThompson's Station. After withdrawing to the north bank of Duck River I telegraphed on the morning of November 28: I am in doubt whether it is advisable, with reference to future operations, to hold this position or to retire to some point from which we can move offensively. Of course we cannot recross the river here. I cou Hood across Duck River if we can get him to move toward Clarksville. Is there no convenience for unloading beyond Thompson's Station? Geo. H. Thomas, Major-General, Commanding. War Records, Vol. XLV, part i, p. 1108. The published records pike, the column from Duck River would have taken the country road a short distance to the west of Spring Hill and Thompson's Station, and marched on to Franklin. The situation at Spring Hill in the night was not by any means a desperate one. Vet
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