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Troy, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
unarmed and confiding people rapidly spreading far out upon the plains. With my cavalry and carbined artillery encamped in front, I wanted no other occupation in life than to ward off the savage and kill off his food until there should no longer be an Indian frontier in our beautiful country. But soon after my pickets were put out on the plains, there came the sad news of the sudden death, in San Francisco, of my old commander, General George H. Thomas. His body was brought east to Troy, New York, for interment. All his old companions, including President Grant, assembled to pay the last tribute of respect and honor to that noble old soldier, whose untimely death was deeply mourned by all. It was a most impressive scene. All the high commanders of the vast army which had been disbanded five years before assembled around the grave of one of their number. The hero was buried, as he had lived, honored by all who knew him, and mourned by the nation he had so faithfully served.
Tuolumne (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
the wagon-tracks a horizontal motion of several feet had taken place, the road marking its permanent effect. We ascended Owens River valley to the source of that stream, recrossed the mountains by the bloody cañon, and descended through the great Yosemite valley, which from the higher altitude looked like a little hole in the ground. That was the least interesting of all my four visits to that wonderful work of nature. Our round trip occupied about seven weeks. At our last camp, in Tuolumne meadows, some time in August, after the temperature had been above eighty degrees in the daytime, it fell below thirty at night. I contracted a cold which developed into pneumonia, from which I did not recover for many months. It was during my convalescence that I went with Colonel B. S. Alexander to the Hawaiian Islands, under an arrangement previously made with the War Department. It was the year 1872 when I and Colonel Alexander, the senior engineer officer on the Pacific coast, who
Salt Lake City (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
e, it fell to my lot to take the Division of the Pacific, which I had a year before gladly relinquished in favor of General Thomas. Soon after my arrival in San Francisco, General Sherman met me there, and we went together, by sea, to Oregon, where we met General Canby, then commanding the Department of the Columbia. We ascended the Columbia River to Umatilla, and rode by stage from that place to Kelton, on the Central Pacific Railroad, seven hundred and fifty miles. After a visit to Salt Lake City, we returned to St. Louis, where I had some work to complete as president of a board on tactics and small arms, upon the completion of which I returned to San Francisco. In the summer of 1871, after the great earthquake of that year, I made a trip across the Sierra to Camp Independence, which had been destroyed, to consider the question of rebuilding that post. Of the buildings, brick or adobe, not one remained in condition to be occupied. Very fortunately, all in the garrison had r
Fort Riley (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ouri a cordial reception from former Opponents in St. Louis origin of the military school at Fort Riley funeral of General George H. Thomas death of General George G. Meade assigned to the Divisi when I was in the War Department, I ordered a light-artillery school to be established at Fort Riley, Kansas. Also, upon his suggestion, I directed that the four batteries which were to compose thatraids, and thus overcome any objection which might be urged on the ground that the barracks at Fort Riley were needed for cavalry. The school was organized, under Colonel John Hamilton; the batteriese army, a move was made by somebody to get possession of that splendid military reservation of Fort Riley for some other purpose. Hence it became necessary to manifest in some more striking way the iator Plumb of Kansas, to obtain the necessary funds and build a suitable post and establish at Fort Riley a school of cavalry and light artillery. The result finally attained, when I was in command o
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
s to Chicago, which then became for the first time the principal military center of all the Western country. These arrangements were intended to be as nearly permanent as practicable, so that all might have a period of comparative rest after the eight years of war and strife. I then reverted, for the first time in those eight years, to the thoughts and ambitions of my youth and young manhood, for I had grown much older in that time. First was the ambition, inherited from my grandfather McAllister, to acquire a farm big enough to keep all the neighbors at a respectful distance. In company with my brother and another officer, I bought in Colorado a ranch about ten miles square, and projected some farming and stock-raising on a large scale. My dream was to prepare a place where I could, ere long, retire from public life and pass the remainder of my days in peace and in the enjoyment of all those outof-door sports which were always so congenial to me. But events over which I had no c
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 23
onfidentially, the value of those islands to the United States for military and naval purposes, went to Hawaii of the preceding king had been annexation to the United States; but the new sovereign and his advisers were oppction ought to be taken at once to secure to the United States the exclusive right to the use of Pearl River haand to prepare the way to make annexation to the United States sure in due time. This could readily be done byof which would be to the ultimate benefit of the United States when the islands should become a part of this cole of statesman will admit for a moment that the United States cannot govern, and govern well, any national outlity to the government and entire people of the United States has vastly greater. When it was proposed to mty to the government and the whole people of the United States. There need be no apprehension that any Americases the army may be employed. The people of the United States are advancing, though slowly, in civilization.
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
early permanent as practicable, so that all might have a period of comparative rest after the eight years of war and strife. I then reverted, for the first time in those eight years, to the thoughts and ambitions of my youth and young manhood, for I had grown much older in that time. First was the ambition, inherited from my grandfather McAllister, to acquire a farm big enough to keep all the neighbors at a respectful distance. In company with my brother and another officer, I bought in Colorado a ranch about ten miles square, and projected some farming and stock-raising on a large scale. My dream was to prepare a place where I could, ere long, retire from public life and pass the remainder of my days in peace and in the enjoyment of all those outof-door sports which were always so congenial to me. But events over which I had no control soon defeated that scheme. That, like all the other plans of my own invention, came to naught. The ranch was sold, and I got out of it, as I alw
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
longer be an Indian frontier in our beautiful country. But soon after my pickets were put out on the plains, there came the sad news of the sudden death, in San Francisco, of my old commander, General George H. Thomas. His body was brought east to Troy, New York, for interment. All his old companions, including President Grante, it fell to my lot to take the Division of the Pacific, which I had a year before gladly relinquished in favor of General Thomas. Soon after my arrival in San Francisco, General Sherman met me there, and we went together, by sea, to Oregon, where we met General Canby, then commanding the Department of the Columbia. We ascendeCity, we returned to St. Louis, where I had some work to complete as president of a board on tactics and small arms, upon the completion of which I returned to San Francisco. In the summer of 1871, after the great earthquake of that year, I made a trip across the Sierra to Camp Independence, which had been destroyed, to consider
Yosemite Valley (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
miles along the length of the valley a great crevasse had been formed by the upheaval, which must have been many feet in height. In the subsidence one side had fallen several feet lower than the other, and at a place where the crack crossed the wagon-tracks a horizontal motion of several feet had taken place, the road marking its permanent effect. We ascended Owens River valley to the source of that stream, recrossed the mountains by the bloody cañon, and descended through the great Yosemite valley, which from the higher altitude looked like a little hole in the ground. That was the least interesting of all my four visits to that wonderful work of nature. Our round trip occupied about seven weeks. At our last camp, in Tuolumne meadows, some time in August, after the temperature had been above eighty degrees in the daytime, it fell below thirty at night. I contracted a cold which developed into pneumonia, from which I did not recover for many months. It was during my convale
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
iking way the importance of that place for military uses. The occasion had again come for carrying out that scheme which Hunt and I had devised for doing what was so much needed for the artillery. Fortunately, General Sheridan wanted also to do something beneficial for the cavalry, in which he felt much the same special interest that I did in the artillery. So a sort of alliance, offensive and defensive, was formed, which included as its most active and influential member Senator Plumb of Kansas, to obtain the necessary funds and build a suitable post and establish at Fort Riley a school of cavalry and light artillery. The result finally attained, when I was in command of the army, is well known, and is an honor to the country. The department headquarters were removed to St. Louis during the winter of 1869-70 to make room at Fort Leavenworth for the cavalry who had been on the plains during the summer. I then had the pleasure of renewing the intimate friendships which had been
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