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Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
pter VII Condition of the troops at Knoxville effect of the promotion of Grant and Shermaing of a faulty system. I arrived at Knoxville, Tennessee, on February 8, 1864, and the next day neral John G. Foster. The troops then about Knoxville were the Ninth Corps, two divisions of the Teft with General Burnside after the siege of Knoxville was raised by General Sherman. The Ninth field. Such was the result of the siege of Knoxville, and such the Army of the Ohio when I becamemovement had failed, the troops returning to Knoxville with the loss of considerable material. In ast Tennessee. It was even apprehended that Knoxville might be in danger; and an advance of Longstsoldier. headquarters, army of the Ohio, Knoxville, Tenn., April 15, 1864. dear Senator: I have f my mind. General Sherman, on a visit to Knoxville about the end of March, a few days before thnks and complete equipment, newly clad, from Knoxville toward Dalton. My next thought was to win
Duck River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
f McPherson had not held the entire natural position as far east as the Connasauga River, Johnston could have passed round him in the night. It seems to me certain that McPherson's force was too small to have taken and held that position. Indeed it does not seem at all certain that, however large his force might have been, he could have put troops enough in position before night to accomplish the object of cutting off Johnston's retreat. The case was analogous to that of Hood's crossing Duck River in November of that year, and trying to cut off our retreat at Spring Hill. There was simply not time enough to do it in that one day, and if not done in one day it could not be done at all. So that it does not seem at all certain that this, which was Thomas's plan to throw the entire Army of the Cumberland on the road in Johnston's rear and thus cut off his retreat, would have succeeded any better than Sherman's, yet it gave greater promise of success, and therefore ought to have been
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e equipment, newly clad, from Knoxville toward Dalton. My next thought was to win the respect andfforded in the delicate operations in front of Dalton. The result may perhaps be fairly expressed ithe Atlanta campaign were the operations about Dalton and Resaca. Here I have always thought Genera been put upon the railroad between Resaca and Dalton. The result would then, in all probability, hg enough to occupy and hold a position between Dalton and Resaca. As it was, Thomas should have folating enemy when he was compelled to let go of Dalton, than they were in front of Rocky-face Ridge. that at the beginning of the movement against Dalton, Sherman did not fully understand the charactean would have found in the enemy's trenches at Dalton only a skirmish-line which would have leisurel seize and hold a point on the road in rear of Dalton, and not to break the road and fall back as Mc north, and put between the investing line and Dalton troops enough to hold their ground against the[3 more...]
Bull's Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
eady constructed to ferry the troops across the river. In this manner we were able to advance as far as Morristown by February 29 with sufficient force to reconnoiter Longstreet's position. This reconnaissance demonstrated that the enemy held Bull's Gap, and that his entire force was grouped about that strong position. The object of this movement having been accomplished without loss, our troops retired to New Market to await the arrival of the troops to be sent by General Thomas, the completion of the railroad bridge, and other necessary preparations for the expected campaign. On March 12 another reconnaissance was made as far as Bull's Gap, which was found to be still occupied by the enemy, although reliable information indicated that Longstreet was preparing for, and had perhaps already begun, his movement toward Virginia. Although his force, if concentrated, was much superior to mine, I determined to endeavor to take advantage of his movement to attack his rear. My advance
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
addition to, or in opposition to, theirs. If the Senate is not satisfied with such testimony, I can't help it. I never have and never will resort to buncombe for the purpose of securing my own advancement. If I cannot gain promotion by legitimate means, I do not want it at all. . . . In all this time I have yet to hear the first word of disapproval, from my superior officer, of any one of my military operations (unless I except Curtis, who disapproved of my pursuing Hindman so far into Arkansas), and in general have received high commendation from my superiors, both for my military operations and administration. I would rather have this record without a major-general's commission, than to gain the commission by adding to my reputation one grain of falsehood. . . . Grant was here in the winter, and Sherman only a few days ago. They are fully acquainted with the condition of affairs. I have been acting all the time under their instructions, and I believe with their entire appro
Ackworth, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ed by General Thomas only to support me, and that he would do no more. The day was already far advanced, and before I could bring troops from another part of my line darkness came on, and the action ended for the day. By the next morning I had brought another division of the Twenty-third Corps to the flank, and General Sherman arrived on the ground. By his personal orders this division was pushed straight through the woods to a point in the enemy's rear, on the road leading from Dallas to Acworth, which point it reached without any opposition, and there intrenched. That night Johnston abandoned his lines. An inspection of the enemy's intrenchments demonstrated that our skirmishers were right, and that a single brigade on our left would have been ample to turn the enemy's flank and open the way to victory. The above facts were immediately reported to Sherman and Thomas. I do not know what action, if any, was taken upon them. I refer to this incident, not as especially affecti
French Broad River (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
nooga, and to let me begin the campaign against Longstreet at once. But on February 16 he informed me that the movement would have to be delayed because of some operations in which General Thomas was to engage. Nevertheless, I advanced on the 24th with what force I had, at the same time sending a reconnaissance south of the French Broad River to ascertain the nature of a hostile movement reported in that direction. Upon our advance, Longstreet's troops withdrew across the Holston and French Broad and retreated toward Morristown. His advance had evidently been intended only to cover an attempted cavalry raid upon our rear, which the high water in the Little Tennessee rendered impracticable. We now occupied Strawberry Plains, rebuilt the railroad bridge, pushed forward the construction of a bateau bridge which had been commenced, in the meantime using the bateaux already constructed to ferry the troops across the river. In this manner we were able to advance as far as Morristow
New Market (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
of a bateau bridge which had been commenced, in the meantime using the bateaux already constructed to ferry the troops across the river. In this manner we were able to advance as far as Morristown by February 29 with sufficient force to reconnoiter Longstreet's position. This reconnaissance demonstrated that the enemy held Bull's Gap, and that his entire force was grouped about that strong position. The object of this movement having been accomplished without loss, our troops retired to New Market to await the arrival of the troops to be sent by General Thomas, the completion of the railroad bridge, and other necessary preparations for the expected campaign. On March 12 another reconnaissance was made as far as Bull's Gap, which was found to be still occupied by the enemy, although reliable information indicated that Longstreet was preparing for, and had perhaps already begun, his movement toward Virginia. Although his force, if concentrated, was much superior to mine, I determ
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ed States, nor even all of them together, can command an army. I rather think if you let Grant alone, and let him have his own way, he will end the war this year. At all events, the next ninety days will show whether he will or not. I find this letter is both too long and too ill-natured. I feel too much as if I would like to whip somebody anyhow, so I will stop where I am. Let me hear from you again soon. Yours very truly, J. M. Schofield. Hon. J. B. Henderson, U. S. Senate, Washington, D. C. Of course I knew the advice of my friend Senator Henderson was not intended to be taken seriously, but only as expressing his view, much the same as my own, of the then existing situation in the Senate. But it gave me, all the same, the opportunity I wanted to give his brother senators, through him, a piece of my mind. General Sherman, on a visit to Knoxville about the end of March, a few days before the date of the foregoing letter, disclosed to me his general plans for the co
Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
. To illustrate the faulty system of organization and command which characterized the Atlanta campaign, I will now refer to an incident of the operations about Dallas, it being next in order of date of those I wish to consider. General Sherman does not allude to it at all in his Memoirs. Near the close of the operations about Dallas, the Twenty-third Corps was moved to our left, under instructions from General Sherman to endeavor to strike the enemy's right flank. A division of the Army of the Cumberland was ordered to support the Twenty-third Corps. There were no roads available, and the country was in the main densely wooded. The head of the coherman arrived on the ground. By his personal orders this division was pushed straight through the woods to a point in the enemy's rear, on the road leading from Dallas to Acworth, which point it reached without any opposition, and there intrenched. That night Johnston abandoned his lines. An inspection of the enemy's intrench
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