hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George H. Thomas 1,422 6 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 1,342 2 Browse Search
John B. Hood 1,058 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 610 4 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 480 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 412 0 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 390 4 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 242 0 Browse Search
Columbia, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) 234 4 Browse Search
Frederick Dent Grant 229 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army. Search the whole document.

Found 269 total hits in 41 results.

1 2 3 4 5
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
the corps. I could not compete with Mac at all in the lettering business, but I tried to follow his good example, in my own way, by helping the boys over knotty points in math and phil. I had taught district school one winter before going to West Point, and hence had acquired the knack of explaining things. Hood was not well up in mathematics. The first part of the course especially he found very hard—so much so that he became discouraged. After the unauthorized festivities of Christmas, particularly, he seemed much depressed. On the 26th he asked me which I would prefer to be, an officer of the army or a farmer in Kentucky? I replied in a way which aroused his ambition to accomplish what he had set out to do in coming to West Point, without regard to preference between farming and soldiering. He went to work in good earnest, and passed the January examination, though by a very narrow margin. From that time on he did not seem to have so much difficulty. When we were fighti
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
alf the force upon the enemy's rear, so as to compel him to attack that force or else retreat by side roads with loss of trains and artillery. This would doubtless have been a bold departure from the ancient tactics, which had not yet been proved obsolete. Yet I always thought it strange that our leading generals were unwilling to attempt it. Had Sherman divided his army in such a way, and struck at Hood's rear, he might have found a chance to destroy that army as well as the railroads in Georgia. The death of McPherson, on July 22, was felt by all to be an irreparable loss, and by none more so than by General Sherman, who manifested deep feeling when the body was brought to the Howard House, east of Atlanta. I recollect well his remark to the effect that the whole of the Confederacy could not atone for the sacrifice of one such life. My recollection of some of the incidents of that day differs in some respects from that of General Sherman. As soon as it was known that the A
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
veteran troops the death of McPherson before Atlanta Sherman's error in a question of relative rad was killed in the next great battle. After Atlanta had fallen I went home, as McPherson would doeautiful, quiet Sunday afternoon, in front of Atlanta, when even the pickets were respecting the Sa front of Allatoona, as well as that by which Atlanta was afterward captured. Hence the existence ovement, it was urged, at Dalton, Kenesaw, or Atlanta would have compelled Johnston to fight a battbody was brought to the Howard House, east of Atlanta. I recollect well his remark to the effect testion of my attempting to make a lodgment in Atlanta that day, as stated by Sherman in Vol. II, pd made a wide circuit from his defenses about Atlanta and attacked our left several miles distant. e enemy, with the hope of cutting it off from Atlanta. Instead of this, Thomas spent the day in efforts to make a lodgment in Atlanta over well-prepared fortifications which the Georgia militia cou
Allatoona (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
prudence stretch out any more, but we did not agree in the conclusion and therefore there was no alternative, etc. Indeed, such conclusion was extremely illogical, as was demonstrated a few days later, when one of the other alternatives was adopted with success. This successful movement was essentially the same as that which had been previously made to dislodge the enemy from Dalton, and that by which Sherman's army had been transferred from New Hope Church to the railroad in front of Allatoona, as well as that by which Atlanta was afterward captured. Hence the existence of this alternative could not have been unthought of by any of us at the time of the assault on Kenesaw. But there was another alternative in this and similar cases, which was much discussed at various times during the campaign. Its practicability can be judged of only upon general principles, for it was never tried. It was to detach two or three corps, nearly half our army (which was about double the stren
Wilson's Creek (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
en early in the campaign. Later, both generals and orderlies had learned to restrain somewhat their curiosity and their too thoughtless bravery. The perfect old soldier has learned to economize the life and strength of men, including his own, with somewhat the same care that he does those of artillery horses and transportation mules. It is only the young soldier who does not know the difference between husbanding the national resources and showing cowardice in face of the enemy. At Wilson's Creek, where the brave Lyon was killed in August. 1861, and where the gallant volunteers on both sides had fought with almost unexampled courage, standing up to their work all the time, until one third of their numbers were killed or wounded, and their forty rounds of ammunition gone, the little companies of old, regular Indian-fighters had been deployed as skirmishers in close order, behind trees and bushes and hillocks, and had suffered comparatively small losses. The following colloquy oc
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
lping the boys over knotty points in math and phil. I had taught district school one winter before going to West Point, and hence had acquired the knack of explaining things. Hood was not well up in mathematics. The first part of the course especially he found very hard—so much so that he became discouraged. After the unauthorized festivities of Christmas, particularly, he seemed much depressed. On the 26th he asked me which I would prefer to be, an officer of the army or a farmer in Kentucky? I replied in a way which aroused his ambition to accomplish what he had set out to do in coming to West Point, without regard to preference between farming and soldiering. He went to work in good earnest, and passed the January examination, though by a very narrow margin. From that time on he did not seem to have so much difficulty. When we were fighting each other so desperately, fifteen years later, I wondered whether Hood remembered the encouragement I had given him to become a sold
Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
t to the Camp of Frank P. Blair, Jr. anecdote of Sherman and Hooker under fire the assault on Kenesaw tendency of veteran troops the death of McPherson before Atlanta Sherman's error in a questiea, as indicated by his despatch to Sherman, that Johnston had drawn his main force from around Kenesaw, and was about to strike our extreme right. I recollect that I was all the time on the watch fthe contrary. In the final movement which resulted in the withdrawal of Johnston's army from Kenesaw, the Army of the Tennessee passed by the right flank of my infantry line along the famous Sandtof this alternative could not have been unthought of by any of us at the time of the assault on Kenesaw. But there was another alternative in this and similar cases, which was much discussed at vaications, and strike directly at his flank and rear. Such a movement, it was urged, at Dalton, Kenesaw, or Atlanta would have compelled Johnston to fight a battle on equal terms with one half of She
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
which he was responsible, to another staff officer, saying he was going to be killed that day. My too numerous staff and escort had attracted attention. I had at Dalton a few days before forbade the staff and escort to follow me into action, unless specially ordered to do so; but they had not so soon learned the lesson which the other alternatives was adopted with success. This successful movement was essentially the same as that which had been previously made to dislodge the enemy from Dalton, and that by which Sherman's army had been transferred from New Hope Church to the railroad in front of Allatoona, as well as that by which Atlanta was afterward e the strength of the enemy), make a detour wide enough to avoid his fortifications, and strike directly at his flank and rear. Such a movement, it was urged, at Dalton, Kenesaw, or Atlanta would have compelled Johnston to fight a battle on equal terms with one half of Sherman's army, while he had to hold his parapets against the
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
t time I ever saw General Sherman and General Hooker together, or got even a suspicion that their personal relations were other than the most satisfactory, was at Resaca. Cox's division had gained possession of some portions of the enemy's outer works, so that from a bald hill just in rear of our line some parts of the main line ery,--when we were moving into action that morning, exploded near my head, and killed the aide who was riding behind me. Captain A. H. Engle, who was killed at Resaca, was a most charming and talented youth, only twenty years of age. That was his first battle. He was caterer of the headquarters mess. That morning, before leavre forbade the staff and escort to follow me into action, unless specially ordered to do so; but they had not so soon learned the lesson which the sad casualty at Resaca taught them. It was then early in the campaign. Later, both generals and orderlies had learned to restrain somewhat their curiosity and their too thoughtless br
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 8
line of battle. One of the first subjects that came up was that question of relative rank; for our troops had met and were then doing duty together, in the language of the old article of war. But the subject was quickly dismissed with the remark, made almost simultaneously by both, that such a question could not possibly cause any difficulty between us. Mc-Pherson had the senior commission of major-general, and I the senior assignment as army commander. Perhaps it would have puzzled even Halleck to frame a satisfactory decision in that peculiar case. I had long before determined what my decision would be if that question ever became a practical one between McPherson and myself on the field of battle. I would have said, in substance at least: Mac, just tell me what you want me to do. As we sat together that day, McPherson confided to me the secret of his marriage engagement, for the purpose, as he stated, of inquiring whether, in my opinion, he could before long find a chance t
1 2 3 4 5