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Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 Naturalist; born in Motier parish, near Neuchatel, Switzerland, May 28. 1807. He was of Huguenot descent, was thoroughly educated at Heidelberg and Munich, and received the honorary degree of Ph.D. He prosecuted his studies in natural history in Paris, where Cuvier offered him his collection for the purpose. The liberality of Humboldt enabled him to publish his great work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He aft
Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 Naturalist; born in Motier parish, near Neuchatel, Switzerland, May 28. 1807. He was of Huguenot descent, was thoroughly educated at Heidelberg and Munich, and received the honorary degree of Ph.D. He prosecuted his studies in natural history in Paris, where Cuvier offered him his collection for the purpose. The liberality of Humboldt enabled him to publish his great work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He aft
Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 Naturalist; born in Motier parish, near Neuchatel, Switzerland, May 28. 1807. He was of Huguenot descent, was thoroughly educated at Heidelberg and Munich, and received the honorary degree of Ph.D. He prosecuted his studies in natural history in Paris, where Cuvier offered him his collection for the purpose. The liberality of Humboldt enabled him to publish his great work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He aft
Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 Naturalist; born in Motier parish, near Neuchatel, Switzerland, May 28. 1807. He was of Huguenot descent, was thoroughly educated at Heidelberg and Munich, and received the honorary degree of Ph.D. He prosecuted his studies in natural history in Paris, where Cuvier offered him his collection for the purpose. The liberality of Humboldt enabled him to publish his great work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He aft
ssiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 Naturalist; born in Motier parish, near Neuchatel, Switzerland, May 28. 1807. He was of Huguenot descent, was thoroughly educated at Heidelberg and Munich, and received the honorary degree of Ph.D. He prosecuted his studies in natural history in Paris, where Cuvier offered him his collection for the purpose. The liberality of Humboldt enabled him to publish his great work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He afterwar
nd, May 28. 1807. He was of Huguenot descent, was thoroughly educated at Heidelberg and Munich, and received the honorary degree of Ph.D. He prosecuted his studies in natural history in Paris, where Cuvier offered him his collection for the purpose. The liberality of Humboldt enabled him to publish his great work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He afterwards explored the southern coasts of the United States, of Brazil, and the waters of the Pacific Ocea
bled him to publish his great work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He afterwards explored the southern coasts of the United States, of Brazil, and the waters of the Pacific Ocean. An account of his explorations on the Brazilian coast was given in A journey to Brazil, by Mrs. Agassiz, in 1867. He received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society of London; from the Aeademy of Sciences of Paris, the Monthyon Prize and the Cuvier Prize; the Wollaston Medal
entific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He afterwards explored the southern coasts of the United States, of Brazil, and the waters of the Pacific Ocean. An account of his explorations on the Brazilian coast was given in A journey to Brazil, by Mrs. Agassiz, in 1867. He received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society of London; from the Aeademy of Sciences of Paris, the Monthyon Prize and the Cuvier Prize; the Wollaston Medal from the Geological Society of London; and the Medal of Merit from the King of Prussia. He was a member of many scientific societies, and the universities of Dublin and Ediniburgh conferred on him the honorary degree of Ll.D. Professor Agassiz published valuable scientific works in Europe and in the United States. He died in Ca
Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 Naturalist; born in Motier parish, near Neuchatel, Switzerland, May 28. 1807. He was of Huguenot descent, was thoroughly educated at Heidelberg and Munich, and received the honorary degree of Ph.D. He prosecuted his studies in natural history in Paris, where Cuvier offered him his collection for the purpose. The liberality of Humboldt enabled him to publish his great work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He aft
sor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He afterwards explored the southern coasts of the United States, of Brazil, and the waters of the Pacific Ocean. An account of his explorations on the Brazilian coast was given in A journey to Brazil, by Mrs. Agassiz, in 1867. He received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society of London; from the Aeademy of Sciences of Paris, the Monthyon Prize and the Cuvier Prize; the Wollaston Medal from the Geological Society of London; and the Medal of Merit from the King of Prussia. He was a member of many scientific societies, and the universities of Dublin and Ediniburgh conferred on him the honorary degree of Ll.D. Professor Agassiz published valuable scientific works in Europe and in the United States. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 14, 1873.
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