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California (California, United States) (search for this): entry american-party
reference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,631 popular and thirty-nine electoral votes; reappeared with a ticket in 1880, which received 707 popular votes; and again in 1888, when 1,591 votes were cast for the party candidates in California; and have made no nominations since. See know-Nothings.
United States (United States) (search for this): entry american-party
American party, A political organization founded in 1854, the members of which became known as Know-nothings, because in their endeavors to preserve the secrecy of their movements they were instructed to reply I don't know to any question asked in reference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,
eference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,631 popular and thirty-nine electoral votes; reappeared with a ticket in 1880, which received 707 popular votes; and again in 1888, when 1,591 votes were cast for the party candidates in California; and have made no nominations since. See know-Nothings.
reference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,631 popular and thirty-nine electoral votes; reappeared with a ticket in 1880, which received 707 popular votes; and again in 1888, when 1,591 votes were cast for the party candidates in California; and have made no nominations since. See know-Nothings.
eference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,631 popular and thirty-nine electoral votes; reappeared with a ticket in 1880, which received 707 popular votes; and again in 1888, when 1,591 votes were cast for the party candidates in California; and have made no nominations since. See know-Nothings.
American party, A political organization founded in 1854, the members of which became known as Know-nothings, because in their endeavors to preserve the secrecy of their movements they were instructed to reply I don't know to any question asked in reference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,
reference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,631 popular and thirty-nine electoral votes; reappeared with a ticket in 1880, which received 707 popular votes; and again in 1888, when 1,591 votes were cast for the party candidates in California; and have made no nominations since. See know-Nothings.
reference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,631 popular and thirty-nine electoral votes; reappeared with a ticket in 1880, which received 707 popular votes; and again in 1888, when 1,591 votes were cast for the party candidates in California; and have made no nominations since. See know-Nothings.
reference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,631 popular and thirty-nine electoral votes; reappeared with a ticket in 1880, which received 707 popular votes; and again in 1888, when 1,591 votes were cast for the party candidates in California; and have made no nominations since. See know-Nothings.
American party, A political organization founded in 1854, the members of which became known as Know-nothings, because in their endeavors to preserve the secrecy of their movements they were instructed to reply I don't know to any question asked in reference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,6
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