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ailing around Land's End, in the space of thirty days he captured no less than twenty valuable British merchantmen, with cargoes valued at $2,000,000. Too far away from friendly ports into which he might send his prizes, he burned all the vessels. Every non-combatant captive he allowed to remove his private property, and for this generosity he was thanked by them. The British government, alarmed by the exploits of the Argus, sent out several cruisers after her. Just before the dawn of Aug. 14, 1813, the British brig Pelican, 18, Capt. J. F. Maples, appeared; and at six o'clock the Argus wore round and delivered a broadside upon her at grape-shot distance. The fire was immediately returned, and a round shot carried away Allen's leg. He refused to be taken from the deck; but soon becoming unconscious from loss of blood, he was taken to the cockpit, and died the next day. The men of the Argus, weakened by too free use of captured wine the night before, did not fight with their usual
he vessels. Every non-combatant captive he allowed to remove his private property, and for this generosity he was thanked by them. The British government, alarmed by the exploits of the Argus, sent out several cruisers after her. Just before the dawn of Aug. 14, 1813, the British brig Pelican, 18, Capt. J. F. Maples, appeared; and at six o'clock the Argus wore round and delivered a broadside upon her at grape-shot distance. The fire was immediately returned, and a round shot carried away Allen's leg. He refused to be taken from the deck; but soon becoming unconscious from loss of blood, he was taken to the cockpit, and died the next day. The men of the Argus, weakened by too free use of captured wine the night before, did not fight with their usual vigor, yet they handled the vessel admirably. Lieut. W. Howard Allen was left in chief command. Very soon the Argus became so badly injured that she began to reel. All her braces were shot away, and she could not be kept in position.
Argus, capture of the. The American brig Argus, Capt. W. H. Allen, bore to France William H. Crawford, United States minister to that government. She afterwards cruised in British waters, and by the celerity of her movements and destructive energy she spread consternation throughout commercial England. She carried 32-pound carronades and two bowguns; and her commander, who had served under Decatur, was one of the most gallant men of the navy. He roamed the chops of the Channel successfuscious from loss of blood, he was taken to the cockpit, and died the next day. The men of the Argus, weakened by too free use of captured wine the night before, did not fight with their usual vigor, yet they handled the vessel admirably. Lieut. W. Howard Allen was left in chief command. Very soon the Argus became so badly injured that she began to reel. All her braces were shot away, and she could not be kept in position. the Pelican at length crossed her stern, and raked her dreadfully; and
Argus, capture of the. The American brig Argus, Capt. W. H. Allen, bore to France William H. Crawford, United States minister to that government. She afterwards cruised in British waters, and by the celerity of her movements and destructive energy she spread consternation throughout commercial England. She carried 32-pound carronades and two bowguns; and her commander, who had served under Decatur, was one of the most gallant men of the navy. He roamed the chops of the Channel successfully; and, sailing around Land's End, in the space of thirty days he captured no less than twenty valuable British merchantmen, with cargoes valued at $2,000,000. Too far away from friendly ports into which he might send his prizes, he burned all the vessels. Every non-combatant captive he allowed to remove his private property, and for this generosity he was thanked by them. The British government, alarmed by the exploits of the Argus, sent out several cruisers after her. Just before the dawn
William Harris Crawford (search for this): entry argus-capture-of-the
Argus, capture of the. The American brig Argus, Capt. W. H. Allen, bore to France William H. Crawford, United States minister to that government. She afterwards cruised in British waters, and by the celerity of her movements and destructive energy she spread consternation throughout commercial England. She carried 32-pound carronades and two bowguns; and her commander, who had served under Decatur, was one of the most gallant men of the navy. He roamed the chops of the Channel successfully; and, sailing around Land's End, in the space of thirty days he captured no less than twenty valuable British merchantmen, with cargoes valued at $2,000,000. Too far away from friendly ports into which he might send his prizes, he burned all the vessels. Every non-combatant captive he allowed to remove his private property, and for this generosity he was thanked by them. The British government, alarmed by the exploits of the Argus, sent out several cruisers after her. Just before the dawn
Argus, capture of the. The American brig Argus, Capt. W. H. Allen, bore to France William H. Crawford, United States minister to that government. She afterwards cruised in British waters, and by the celerity of her movements and destructive energy she spread consternation throughout commercial England. She carried 32-pound carronades and two bowguns; and her commander, who had served under Decatur, was one of the most gallant men of the navy. He roamed the chops of the Channel successfully; and, sailing around Land's End, in the space of thirty days he captured no less than twenty valuable British merchantmen, with cargoes valued at $2,000,000. Too far away from friendly ports into which he might send his prizes, he burned all the vessels. Every non-combatant captive he allowed to remove his private property, and for this generosity he was thanked by them. The British government, alarmed by the exploits of the Argus, sent out several cruisers after her. Just before the dawn
The American brig Argus, Capt. W. H. Allen, bore to France William H. Crawford, United States minister to that government. She afterwards cruised in British waters, and by the celerity of her movements and destructive energy she spread consternation throughout commercial England. She carried 32-pound carronades and two bowguns; and her commander, who had served under Decatur, was one of the most gallant men of the navy. He roamed the chops of the Channel successfully; and, sailing around Land's End, in the space of thirty days he captured no less than twenty valuable British merchantmen, with cargoes valued at $2,000,000. Too far away from friendly ports into which he might send his prizes, he burned all the vessels. Every non-combatant captive he allowed to remove his private property, and for this generosity he was thanked by them. The British government, alarmed by the exploits of the Argus, sent out several cruisers after her. Just before the dawn of Aug. 14, 1813, the Brit
y days he captured no less than twenty valuable British merchantmen, with cargoes valued at $2,000,000. Too far away from friendly ports into which he might send his prizes, he burned all the vessels. Every non-combatant captive he allowed to remove his private property, and for this generosity he was thanked by them. The British government, alarmed by the exploits of the Argus, sent out several cruisers after her. Just before the dawn of Aug. 14, 1813, the British brig Pelican, 18, Capt. J. F. Maples, appeared; and at six o'clock the Argus wore round and delivered a broadside upon her at grape-shot distance. The fire was immediately returned, and a round shot carried away Allen's leg. He refused to be taken from the deck; but soon becoming unconscious from loss of blood, he was taken to the cockpit, and died the next day. The men of the Argus, weakened by too free use of captured wine the night before, did not fight with their usual vigor, yet they handled the vessel admirably. L
Argus, capture of the. The American brig Argus, Capt. W. H. Allen, bore to France William H. Crawford, United States minister to that government. She afterwards cruised in British waters, and by the celerity of her movements and destructive energy she spread consternation throughout commercial England. She carried 32-pound carronades and two bowguns; and her commander, who had served under Decatur, was one of the most gallant men of the navy. He roamed the chops of the Channel successfully; and, sailing around Land's End, in the space of thirty days he captured no less than twenty valuable British merchantmen, with cargoes valued at $2,000,000. Too far away from friendly ports into which he might send his prizes, he burned all the vessels. Every non-combatant captive he allowed to remove his private property, and for this generosity he was thanked by them. The British government, alarmed by the exploits of the Argus, sent out several cruisers after her. Just before the dawn
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry argus-capture-of-the
Argus, capture of the. The American brig Argus, Capt. W. H. Allen, bore to France William H. Crawford, United States minister to that government. She afterwards cruised in British waters, and by the celerity of her movements and destructive energy she spread consternation throughout commercial England. She carried 32-pound carronades and two bowguns; and her commander, who had served under Decatur, was one of the most gallant men of the navy. He roamed the chops of the Channel successfully; and, sailing around Land's End, in the space of thirty days he captured no less than twenty valuable British merchantmen, with cargoes valued at $2,000,000. Too far away from friendly ports into which he might send his prizes, he burned all the vessels. Every non-combatant captive he allowed to remove his private property, and for this generosity he was thanked by them. The British government, alarmed by the exploits of the Argus, sent out several cruisers after her. Just before the dawn
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