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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 13 total hits in 7 results.

Dead River (United States) (search for this): entry auttose-battle-of
orgians, when Gen. John Floyd, at the head of 950 militia of that State and 450 friendly Indians, guided by Mordecai, a Jew trader, entered the region of the hostiles from the east. Crossing the Chattahoochee, he pushed on towards the Tallapoosa, where he was informed that a large number of hostile Indians had gatliered at the village of Auttose. on the Holy ground, on which the prophets had made the barbarians believe no white man could set foot and live. It was on the left bank of the Tallapoosa, about 20 miles above its confluence with the Coosa. Floyd encamped unobserved near the town on the evening of Nov. 28, and at dawn he appeared before the village with his troops arrayed for battle in three columns. He also had two or three field-pieces. There were two towns, one below the other. The towns were simultaneously attacked, and a general battle ensued. After a brief contest, the roar of artillery and a furious bayonet charge made the Indians fall back in terror to whatever
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry auttose-battle-of
Auttose, battle of. Late in November, 1813, the Creek country was invaded by troops from Georgia. A cry for help from the settlers along the Creeks had come to the ears of the Georgians, when Gen. John Floyd, at the head of 950 militia of that State and 450 friendly Indians, guided by Mordecai, a Jew trader, entered the region of the hostiles from the east. Crossing the Chattahoochee, he pushed on towards the Tallapoosa, where he was informed that a large number of hostile Indians had gatliered at the village of Auttose. on the Holy ground, on which the prophets had made the barbarians believe no white man could set foot and live. It was on the left bank of the Tallapoosa, about 20 miles above its confluence with the Coosa. Floyd encamped unobserved near the town on the evening of Nov. 28, and at dawn he appeared before the village with his troops arrayed for battle in three columns. He also had two or three field-pieces. There were two towns, one below the other. The tow
Auttose, battle of. Late in November, 1813, the Creek country was invaded by troops from Georgia. A cry for help from the settlers along the Creeks had come to the ears of the Georgians, when Gen. John Floyd, at the head of 950 militia of that State and 450 friendly Indians, guided by Mordecai, a Jew trader, entered the region of the hostiles from the east. Crossing the Chattahoochee, he pushed on towards the Tallapoosa, where he was informed that a large number of hostile Indians had gatliered at the village of Auttose. on the Holy ground, on which the prophets had made the barbarians believe no white man could set foot and live. It was on the left bank of the Tallapoosa, about 20 miles above its confluence with the Coosa. Floyd encamped unobserved near the town on the evening of Nov. 28, and at dawn he appeared before the village with his troops arrayed for battle in three columns. He also had two or three field-pieces. There were two towns, one below the other. The town
Attiwandaronk Indians (search for this): entry auttose-battle-of
Auttose, battle of. Late in November, 1813, the Creek country was invaded by troops from Georgia. A cry for help from the settlers along the Creeks had come to the ears of the Georgians, when Gen. John Floyd, at the head of 950 militia of that State and 450 friendly Indians, guided by Mordecai, a Jew trader, entered the region of the hostiles from the east. Crossing the Chattahoochee, he pushed on towards the Tallapoosa, where he was informed that a large number of hostile Indians had gatliered at the village of Auttose. on the Holy ground, on which the prophets had made the barbarians believe no white man could set foot and live. It was on the left bank of the Tallapoosa, about 20 miles above its confluence with the Coosa. Floyd encamped unobserved near the town on the evening of Nov. 28, and at dawn he appeared before the village with his troops arrayed for battle in three columns. He also had two or three field-pieces. There were two towns, one below the other. The tow
er, 1813, the Creek country was invaded by troops from Georgia. A cry for help from the settlers along the Creeks had come to the ears of the Georgians, when Gen. John Floyd, at the head of 950 militia of that State and 450 friendly Indians, guided by Mordecai, a Jew trader, entered the region of the hostiles from the east. Cross made the barbarians believe no white man could set foot and live. It was on the left bank of the Tallapoosa, about 20 miles above its confluence with the Coosa. Floyd encamped unobserved near the town on the evening of Nov. 28, and at dawn he appeared before the village with his troops arrayed for battle in three columns. He aln number, were burned, and the smitten and dismayed barbarians were hunted and butchered with fiendish cruelty. It was estimated that fully 200 of the Indians were murdered. Floyd lost eleven men killed and fifty-four wounded. He had marched 120 miles, laid waste the town, and destroyed the inhabitants in the space of seven days.
w trader, entered the region of the hostiles from the east. Crossing the Chattahoochee, he pushed on towards the Tallapoosa, where he was informed that a large number of hostile Indians had gatliered at the village of Auttose. on the Holy ground, on which the prophets had made the barbarians believe no white man could set foot and live. It was on the left bank of the Tallapoosa, about 20 miles above its confluence with the Coosa. Floyd encamped unobserved near the town on the evening of Nov. 28, and at dawn he appeared before the village with his troops arrayed for battle in three columns. He also had two or three field-pieces. There were two towns, one below the other. The towns were simultaneously attacked, and a general battle ensued. After a brief contest, the roar of artillery and a furious bayonet charge made the Indians fall back in terror to whatever shelter they could find. Their dwellings, about 400 in number, were burned, and the smitten and dismayed barbarians wer
Auttose, battle of. Late in November, 1813, the Creek country was invaded by troops from Georgia. A cry for help from the settlers along the Creeks had come to the ears of the Georgians, when Gen. John Floyd, at the head of 950 militia of that State and 450 friendly Indians, guided by Mordecai, a Jew trader, entered the region of the hostiles from the east. Crossing the Chattahoochee, he pushed on towards the Tallapoosa, where he was informed that a large number of hostile Indians had gatliered at the village of Auttose. on the Holy ground, on which the prophets had made the barbarians believe no white man could set foot and live. It was on the left bank of the Tallapoosa, about 20 miles above its confluence with the Coosa. Floyd encamped unobserved near the town on the evening of Nov. 28, and at dawn he appeared before the village with his troops arrayed for battle in three columns. He also had two or three field-pieces. There were two towns, one below the other. The town