hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 49 total hits in 16 results.

1 2
Harrison's Island (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry ball-s-bluff-battle-at
e afternoon of Sunday, Oct. 20. At the same time part of a Massachusetts regiment, under Colonel Devens (see Devens, Charles), was ordered to take post upon Harrison's Island, in the Potomac, abreast of Ball's Bluff. Devens went to the island with four companies in flat-boats taken from the Chesapeake and Ohio canal. About 3,000give aid if necessary, Stone, on the morning of the 21st, ordered some Massachusetts troops under Colonels Lee and Devens to cross to the Virginia shore from Harrison's Island to reconnoitre. They did not find the fore in the neighborhood. General Evans, unperceived, lay not far off; and riflemen and cavalry were hovering near flanked. Meanwhile Colonel Baker had been pressing forward from Conrad's Ferry to the relief of the assailed troops. Ranking Devens, he had been ordered to Harrison's Island, with discretionary powers to reinforce the party on the Virginia main or to withdraw all the troops to the Maryland side of the river. He concluded to go f
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry ball-s-bluff-battle-at
re held in readiness as a reserve in case of a battle. With that reserve was a fine body of Pennsylvanians known as the 1st California Regiment. These movements of the Nationals caused an opposing one on the part of the Confederates, who had watched their antagonists with keen vigilance at a point of concealment not far off, Misinformed as to the position of the confederates and supposing McCall to be near enough to give aid if necessary, Stone, on the morning of the 21st, ordered some Massachusetts troops under Colonels Lee and Devens to cross to the Virginia shore from Harrison's Island to reconnoitre. They did not find the fore in the neighborhood. General Evans, unperceived, lay not far off; and riflemen and cavalry were hovering near and waiting a favorable opportunity to strike Devens, who, leaving a part of Lee's command near the Bluff. had advanced to near Leesburg. After a skirmish, in which he lost one man killed and nine wounded, he fell back towards the Bluff. Whi
Leesburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry ball-s-bluff-battle-at
between Edward's and Conrad's ferries, on the Maryland side of the upper Potomac, while the left wing of the Confederate army, under General Evans, lay at Leesburg, in Virginia. Misinformation had caused a belief that the Confederates had left Leesburg at a little past the middle of October, when General McClellan ordered GeneralLeesburg at a little past the middle of October, when General McClellan ordered General McCall, who commanded the advance of the right of the National forces in Virginia, to move forward and occupy Drainesville. At the same time he ordered General Stone to co-operate with General McCall, which he did by Map of Ball's Bluff. making a feint of crossing the river at the two ferries above named on the afternoon of Sun and cavalry were hovering near and waiting a favorable opportunity to strike Devens, who, leaving a part of Lee's command near the Bluff. had advanced to near Leesburg. After a skirmish, in which he lost one man killed and nine wounded, he fell back towards the Bluff. While halting in an open field, he received orders from St
tes had left Leesburg at a little past the middle of October, when General McClellan ordered General McCall, who commanded the advance of the right of the National forces in Virginia, to move forward and occupy Drainesville. At the same time he ordered General Stone to co-operate with General McCall, which he did by Map of Ball's Bluff. making a feint of crossing the river at the two ferries abint of concealment not far off, Misinformed as to the position of the confederates and supposing McCall to be near enough to give aid if necessary, Stone, on the morning of the 21st, ordered some Masse troops to the Maryland side of the river. He concluded to go forward, supposing the forces of McCall and others to be near. He was ignorant of the fact that General McClellan had ordered McCall toMcCall to fall back from Drainesville. On reaching the field of conflict, Baker took the chief command of all the forces on the Bluff, about 1,700 strong. Very soon afterwards, while he was in the thickest
George Brinton McClellan (search for this): entry ball-s-bluff-battle-at
e of the upper Potomac, while the left wing of the Confederate army, under General Evans, lay at Leesburg, in Virginia. Misinformation had caused a belief that the Confederates had left Leesburg at a little past the middle of October, when General McClellan ordered General McCall, who commanded the advance of the right of the National forces in Virginia, to move forward and occupy Drainesville. At the same time he ordered General Stone to co-operate with General McCall, which he did by Map tionary powers to reinforce the party on the Virginia main or to withdraw all the troops to the Maryland side of the river. He concluded to go forward, supposing the forces of McCall and others to be near. He was ignorant of the fact that General McClellan had ordered McCall to fall back from Drainesville. On reaching the field of conflict, Baker took the chief command of all the forces on the Bluff, about 1,700 strong. Very soon afterwards, while he was in the thickest of the fight encou
Edward Dickinson Baker (search for this): entry ball-s-bluff-battle-at
co-operate with General McCall, which he did by Map of Ball's Bluff. making a feint of crossing the river at the two ferries above named on the afternoon of Sunday, Oct. 20. At the same time part of a Massachusetts regiment, under Colonel Devens (see Devens, Charles), was ordered to take post upon Harrison's Island, in the Potomac, abreast of Ball's Bluff. Devens went to the island with four companies in flat-boats taken from the Chesapeake and Ohio canal. About 3,000 men, under Col. Edward D. Baker. q. v.), of the national Senate, acting as brigadier-general, were held in readiness as a reserve in case of a battle. With that reserve was a fine body of Pennsylvanians known as the 1st California Regiment. These movements of the Nationals caused an opposing one on the part of the Confederates, who had watched their antagonists with keen vigilance at a point of concealment not far off, Misinformed as to the position of the confederates and supposing McCall to be near enough to gi
eneral McCall, who commanded the advance of the right of the National forces in Virginia, to move forward and occupy Drainesville. At the same time he ordered General Stone to co-operate with General McCall, which he did by Map of Ball's Bluff. making a feint of crossing the river at the two ferries above named on the afternoon igilance at a point of concealment not far off, Misinformed as to the position of the confederates and supposing McCall to be near enough to give aid if necessary, Stone, on the morning of the 21st, ordered some Massachusetts troops under Colonels Lee and Devens to cross to the Virginia shore from Harrison's Island to reconnoitre. burg. After a skirmish, in which he lost one man killed and nine wounded, he fell back towards the Bluff. While halting in an open field, he received orders from Stone to remain there until support could be sent him. His entire force consisted of only 600 men. They were very soon attacked by the Confederates. It was a little pas
Sunday, Oct. 20. At the same time part of a Massachusetts regiment, under Colonel Devens (see Devens, Charles), was ordered to take post upon Harrison's Island, in the Potomac, abreast of Ball's Bluff. Devens went to the island with four companies in flat-boats taken from the Chesapeake and Ohio canal. About 3,000 men, under Ce morning of the 21st, ordered some Massachusetts troops under Colonels Lee and Devens to cross to the Virginia shore from Harrison's Island to reconnoitre. They diden and cavalry were hovering near and waiting a favorable opportunity to strike Devens, who, leaving a part of Lee's command near the Bluff. had advanced to near Leethe Confederates. It was a little past noon. Pressed by overwhelming numbers, Devens fell back to avoid being flanked. Meanwhile Colonel Baker had been pressing forward from Conrad's Ferry to the relief of the assailed troops. Ranking Devens, he had been ordered to Harrison's Island, with discretionary powers to reinforce the
Ball's Bluff, battle at. In October, 1861, a National force, commanded by Gen. Charles P. Stone, was encamped between Edward's and Conrad's ferries, on the Maryland side of the upper Potomac, while the left wing of the Confederate army, under General Evans, lay at Leesburg, in Virginia. Misinformation had caused a belief that the Confederates had left Leesburg at a little past the middle of October, when General McClellan ordered General McCall, who commanded the advance of the right of the National forces in Virginia, to move forward and occupy Drainesville. At the same time he ordered General Stone to co-operate with General McCall, which he did by Map of Ball's Bluff. making a feint of crossing the river at the two ferries above named on the afternoon of Sunday, Oct. 20. At the same time part of a Massachusetts regiment, under Colonel Devens (see Devens, Charles), was ordered to take post upon Harrison's Island, in the Potomac, abreast of Ball's Bluff. Devens went to th
's Bluff, battle at. In October, 1861, a National force, commanded by Gen. Charles P. Stone, was encamped between Edward's and Conrad's ferries, on the Maryland side of the upper Potomac, while the left wing of the Confederate army, under General Evans, lay at Leesburg, in Virginia. Misinformation had caused a belief that the Confederates had left Leesburg at a little past the middle of October, when General McClellan ordered General McCall, who commanded the advance of the right of the Naive aid if necessary, Stone, on the morning of the 21st, ordered some Massachusetts troops under Colonels Lee and Devens to cross to the Virginia shore from Harrison's Island to reconnoitre. They did not find the fore in the neighborhood. General Evans, unperceived, lay not far off; and riflemen and cavalry were hovering near and waiting a favorable opportunity to strike Devens, who, leaving a part of Lee's command near the Bluff. had advanced to near Leesburg. After a skirmish, in which
1 2