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n. W. S. Hancock proceeded to attack the Confederates in front of Deep Bottom on the James River, Aug. 12, 1864. His whole force was placed on transports at City Point, and its destination reported to be Washington. This was to deceive the Confederates. That night it went up the James River; but so tardy was the debarkation that the intended surprise of the Confederates was not effected. Hancock pushed some of his troops by Malvern Hill to flank the Confederates' defence behind Baylis's Creek, while 10,000 men were sent, under Gen. F. C. Barlow, to assail their flank and rear. There were other dispositions for attack; but the delay had allowed Lee to send reinforcements, for the movement seemed to threaten Richmond. On the morning of the 16th, General Birney, with General Terry's division, attacked and carried the Confederate lines, and captured 300 men. The Confederates soon rallied and drove him back. Another part of the attacking force was driven back, and the attempt failed.
Baylis's Creek, battle at. Gen. W. S. Hancock proceeded to attack the Confederates in front of Deep Bottom on the James River, Aug. 12, 1864. His whole force was placed on transports at City Point, and its destination reported to be Washington. This was to deceive the Confederates. That night it went up the James River; but so tardy was the debarkation that the intended surprise of the Confederates was not effected. Hancock pushed some of his troops by Malvern Hill to flank the Confederates' defence behind Baylis's Creek, while 10,000 men were sent, under Gen. F. C. Barlow, to assail their flank and rear. There were other dispositions for attack; but the delay had allowed Lee to send reinforcements, for the movement seemed to threaten Richmond. On the morning of the 16th, General Birney, with General Terry's division, attacked and carried the Confederate lines, and captured 300 men. The Confederates soon rallied and drove him back. Another part of the attacking force was d
Francis Channing Barlow (search for this): entry baylis-s-creek-battle-at
. W. S. Hancock proceeded to attack the Confederates in front of Deep Bottom on the James River, Aug. 12, 1864. His whole force was placed on transports at City Point, and its destination reported to be Washington. This was to deceive the Confederates. That night it went up the James River; but so tardy was the debarkation that the intended surprise of the Confederates was not effected. Hancock pushed some of his troops by Malvern Hill to flank the Confederates' defence behind Baylis's Creek, while 10,000 men were sent, under Gen. F. C. Barlow, to assail their flank and rear. There were other dispositions for attack; but the delay had allowed Lee to send reinforcements, for the movement seemed to threaten Richmond. On the morning of the 16th, General Birney, with General Terry's division, attacked and carried the Confederate lines, and captured 300 men. The Confederates soon rallied and drove him back. Another part of the attacking force was driven back, and the attempt failed.
n. W. S. Hancock proceeded to attack the Confederates in front of Deep Bottom on the James River, Aug. 12, 1864. His whole force was placed on transports at City Point, and its destination reported to be Washington. This was to deceive the Confederates. That night it went up the James River; but so tardy was the debarkation that the intended surprise of the Confederates was not effected. Hancock pushed some of his troops by Malvern Hill to flank the Confederates' defence behind Baylis's Creek, while 10,000 men were sent, under Gen. F. C. Barlow, to assail their flank and rear. There were other dispositions for attack; but the delay had allowed Lee to send reinforcements, for the movement seemed to threaten Richmond. On the morning of the 16th, General Birney, with General Terry's division, attacked and carried the Confederate lines, and captured 300 men. The Confederates soon rallied and drove him back. Another part of the attacking force was driven back, and the attempt failed.
Baylis's Creek, battle at. Gen. W. S. Hancock proceeded to attack the Confederates in front of Deep Bottom on the James River, Aug. 12, 1864. His whole force was placed on transports at City Point, and its destination reported to be Washington. This was to deceive the Confederates. That night it went up the James River; but so tardy was the debarkation that the intended surprise of the Confederates was not effected. Hancock pushed some of his troops by Malvern Hill to flank the Confederates' defence behind Baylis's Creek, while 10,000 men were sent, under Gen. F. C. Barlow, to assail their flank and rear. There were other dispositions for attack; but the delay had allowed Lee to send reinforcements, for the movement seemed to threaten Richmond. On the morning of the 16th, General Birney, with General Terry's division, attacked and carried the Confederate lines, and captured 300 men. The Confederates soon rallied and drove him back. Another part of the attacking force was d
Baylis's Creek, battle at. Gen. W. S. Hancock proceeded to attack the Confederates in front of Deep Bottom on the James River, Aug. 12, 1864. His whole force was placed on transports at City Point, and its destination reported to be Washington. This was to deceive the Confederates. That night it went up the James River; but so tardy was the debarkation that the intended surprise of the Confederates was not effected. Hancock pushed some of his troops by Malvern Hill to flank the Confederates' defence behind Baylis's Creek, while 10,000 men were sent, under Gen. F. C. Barlow, to assail their flank and rear. There were other dispositions for attack; but the delay had allowed Lee to send reinforcements, for the movement seemed to threaten Richmond. On the morning of the 16th, General Birney, with General Terry's division, attacked and carried the Confederate lines, and captured 300 men. The Confederates soon rallied and drove him back. Another part of the attacking force was dr
. W. S. Hancock proceeded to attack the Confederates in front of Deep Bottom on the James River, Aug. 12, 1864. His whole force was placed on transports at City Point, and its destination reported to be Washington. This was to deceive the Confederates. That night it went up the James River; but so tardy was the debarkation that the intended surprise of the Confederates was not effected. Hancock pushed some of his troops by Malvern Hill to flank the Confederates' defence behind Baylis's Creek, while 10,000 men were sent, under Gen. F. C. Barlow, to assail their flank and rear. There were other dispositions for attack; but the delay had allowed Lee to send reinforcements, for the movement seemed to threaten Richmond. On the morning of the 16th, General Birney, with General Terry's division, attacked and carried the Confederate lines, and captured 300 men. The Confederates soon rallied and drove him back. Another part of the attacking force was driven back, and the attempt failed.
. W. S. Hancock proceeded to attack the Confederates in front of Deep Bottom on the James River, Aug. 12, 1864. His whole force was placed on transports at City Point, and its destination reported to be Washington. This was to deceive the Confederates. That night it went up the James River; but so tardy was the debarkation that the intended surprise of the Confederates was not effected. Hancock pushed some of his troops by Malvern Hill to flank the Confederates' defence behind Baylis's Creek, while 10,000 men were sent, under Gen. F. C. Barlow, to assail their flank and rear. There were other dispositions for attack; but the delay had allowed Lee to send reinforcements, for the movement seemed to threaten Richmond. On the morning of the 16th, General Birney, with General Terry's division, attacked and carried the Confederate lines, and captured 300 men. The Confederates soon rallied and drove him back. Another part of the attacking force was driven back, and the attempt failed.
Baylis's Creek (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): entry baylis-s-creek-battle-at
Baylis's Creek, battle at. Gen. W. S. Hancock proceeded to attack the Confederates in front of Deep Bottom on the James River, Aug. 12, 1864. His whole force was placed on transports at City Point, and its destination reported to be Washington. This was to deceive the Confederates. That night it went up the James River; but so tardy was the debarkation that the intended surprise of the Confederates was not effected. Hancock pushed some of his troops by Malvern Hill to flank the Confederates' defence behind Baylis's Creek, while 10,000 men were sent, under Gen. F. C. Barlow, to assail their flank and rear. There were other dispositions for attack; but the delay had allowed Lee to send reinforcements, for the movement seemed to threaten Richmond. On the morning of the 16th, General Birney, with General Terry's division, attacked and carried the Confederate lines, and captured 300 men. The Confederates soon rallied and drove him back. Another part of the attacking force was dr
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry baylis-s-creek-battle-at
Baylis's Creek, battle at. Gen. W. S. Hancock proceeded to attack the Confederates in front of Deep Bottom on the James River, Aug. 12, 1864. His whole force was placed on transports at City Point, and its destination reported to be Washington. This was to deceive the Confederates. That night it went up the James River; but so tardy was the debarkation that the intended surprise of the Confederates was not effected. Hancock pushed some of his troops by Malvern Hill to flank the Confederates' defence behind Baylis's Creek, while 10,000 men were sent, under Gen. F. C. Barlow, to assail their flank and rear. There were other dispositions for attack; but the delay had allowed Lee to send reinforcements, for the movement seemed to threaten Richmond. On the morning of the 16th, General Birney, with General Terry's division, attacked and carried the Confederate lines, and captured 300 men. The Confederates soon rallied and drove him back. Another part of the attacking force was dr
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